FACTOID # 20: Statistically, Delaware bears more cost of the US Military than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Peace" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Peace
Gari Melchers, Mural of Peace, 1896.
Gari Melchers, Mural of Peace, 1896.
For other uses, see Peace (disambiguation).

Peace can be a state of harmony or the absence of hostility. "Peace" can also be a non-violent way of life."Peace" is used to describe the cessation of violent conflict. Peace can mean a state of quiet or tranquility — an absence of disturbance or agitation. Peace can also describe a relationship between any people characterized by respect, justice, and goodwill. Peace can describe calm, serenity, and silence. This latter understanding of peace can also pertain to an individual's sense of himself or herself, as to be "at peace" with one's own mind. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Gari Melchers or Julius Melchers (August 11, 1860 - 1932) was an American artist. ... Look up Peace in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The correct title of this article is tranquility. ... Respect It also could be applied to taking care of oneself, others or the environment. ... This article is about the concept of justice. ... Look up Goodwill in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

Understandings of peace

Many different theories of "peace" exist in the world of peace studies, which involves the study of conflict resolution, disarmament and cessation of violence. [3] The definition of "peace" can vary with religion, culture, or subject of study. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Peace and conflict studies can be defined as the inter-disciplinary inquiry into war as human condition and peace as human potential, as an alternative to the traditional Polemology (War Studies) and the strategies taught at Military academies. ...


Peace as the presence of justice

"Justice and Peace shall kiss" depicts a biblical scene, referencing King James, Psalms#Psalm 85 Psalms 85.
"Justice and Peace shall kiss" depicts a biblical scene, referencing King James, Psalms#Psalm 85 Psalms 85.

Mahatma Gandhi suggested that if an oppressive society lacks violence, the society is nonetheless not peaceful, because of the injustice of the oppression.[citation needed] Gandhi articulated a vision of peace in which justice is an inherent and necessary aspect; that peace requires not only the absence of violence but also the presence of justice.[citation needed] Galtung described this peace, peace with justice, as "positive peace," because hostility and further violence could no longer flourish in this environment.[citation needed] Image File history File links Justitia_et_pax_-_Brescia_-_Pinacoteca_Tosio-Martinengo_-_13-4-2002. ... Image File history File links Justitia_et_pax_-_Brescia_-_Pinacoteca_Tosio-Martinengo_-_13-4-2002. ... “Gandhi” redirects here. ... This article is about the concept of justice. ...


During the 1950s and 60s, when Martin Luther King Jr. and the civil rights movement carried out various non-violent activities aimed at ending segregation and racial persecution in America, they understood peace as more than just the absence of violence. They observed that while there was not open combat between blacks and whites, there was an unjust system in place in which the government deprived African Americans of equal rights.[citation needed] While some opponents criticized the activists for "disturbing the peace", Martin Luther King observed that "True peace is not merely the absence of tension: it is the presence of justice." Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Racial segregation characterised by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Martin Luther King Jr The Letter from Birmingham Jail or Letter from Birmingham City Jail, commonly but incorrectly rendered Letter from a Birmingham Jail, was an open letter on April 16, 1963 written by Martin Luther King, Jr. ...


Galtung coined the term structural violence to refer to such situations, which although not violent on the surface, harbor systematic oppression and injustice.[citation needed] Structural violence, a term which was first used in the 1970s and which has commonly been ascribed to Johan Galtung, denotes a form of violence which corresponds with the systematic ways in which a given social structure or social institution kills people slowly by preventing them from meeting their basic...


Peace and development

One concept or idea that often complements peace studies is development. Economic, cultural, and political development can supposedly take "underdeveloped" nations and peoples out of poverty, thus helping bring about a more peaceful world. As such, many international development agencies carry out projects funded by the governments of industrialized countries, mostly the western, designed to "modernize" poor countries.[1] Development studies is the multi-disciplinary branch of social science which addresses issues of concern to developing nations. ...


The concept of peace has been linked to the wide idea of development, assuming that development is not the classical pursuit of wealth.[citation needed] Peaceful development can be a set of many different elements such as good governance, healthcare, education, gender equality, disaster preparedness, infrastructure, economics, rule of law, human rights, environment and other political issues.[citation needed] The measuring of development uses not only GDP but also numerous measures such as: The terms governance and good governance are increasingly being used in development literature. ... Health care or healthcare is one of the worlds largest and fastest growing professions. ... Feminism is a social theory and political movement primarily informed and motivated by the experience of women. ... Emergency operations or Emergency preparedness is a set of doctrines to prepare civil society to cope with natural or man-made disasters. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The rule of law, in its most basic form, is the principle that no one is above the law. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... This article is about International Development. ... GDP is an acronym which can stand for more than one thing: (in economics) an abbreviation for Gross Domestic Product. ...

In this frame, the problem of peace fully involves the complex matter of human development, what explains the complexity of any peace-building processus. Children reading. ... This article is about the measure of remaining life. ... Graphical representation of the Gini coefficient The Gini coefficient is a measure of inequality of income distribution or inequality of wealth distribution. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ...

Peace is what happens when all peoples are free to develop themselves in the way they want, without having to fight for their rights.

—Bruno Picozzi[2]

Democratic peace

Proponents of the democratic peace theory argue that strong empirical evidence exists that democracies never or rarely make war against each other. An increasing number of nations have become democratic since the industrial revolution, and thus, they claim world peace may become possible if this trend continues. The democratic peace theory, liberal peace theory,[1] or simply the democratic peace is a theory and related empirical research in international relations, political science, and philosophy which holds that democracies — usually, liberal democracies — never or almost never go to war with one another. ... Democracy is a form of government under which the power to alter the laws and structures of government lies, ultimately, with the citizenry. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... World peace is an ideal of freedom, peace, and happiness among and within all nations. ...


Plural peaces

Following Wolfgang Dietrich, Wolfgang Sützl, and the Innsbruck School of Peace Studies, some "peace thinkers" have abandoned any single and all-encompassing definition of peace. Rather, they promote the idea of many peaces. They argue that since no singular, correct definition of peace can exist, peace should be perceived as a plurality.[3] Wolfgang Dietrich (* 13 September 1956 in the Tyrol) is an Austrian peace researcher and political scientist. ...


For example, in the Great Lakes region of Africa, the word for peace is kindoki, which refers to a harmonious balance between human beings, the rest of the natural world, and the cosmos. This vision is a much broader view of peace than a mere "absence of war" or even a "presence of justice" standard.[4] The Greater Lakes and the East African coastline as seen from space. ... The Ancient and Medieval cosmos as depicted in Peter Apians Cosmographia (Antwerp, 1539). ...


These thinkers also critique the idea of peace as a hopeful or eventual end. They recognize that peace does not necessarily have to be something humans might achieve "some day." They contend that peace exists in the present, we can create and expand it in small ways in our everyday lives, and peace changes constantly. This view makes peace permeable and imperfect rather than static and utopian.[5]


Such a view is influenced by postmodernism. Postmodernism is a term applied to a wide-ranging set of developments in critical theory, philosophy, architecture, art, literature, and culture, which are generally characterized as either emerging from, in reaction to, or superseding, modernism. ...


Inner peace

One meaning of peace refers to inner peace, a state of mind, body and mostly soul, a peace within ourselves. People that experience inner peace say that the feeling is not dependent on time, people, place, or any external object or situation, asserting that an individual may experience inner peace even in the midst of war.[citation needed] One of the oldest writings on this subject is the Bhagavad Gita, a part of India's Vedic scriptures. [6] Inner peace (or peace of mind) is a colloquialism that refers to a state of being mentally or spiritually at peace, with enough knowledge and understanding to keep oneself strong in the face of discord or stress. ... For other uses, see Mind (disambiguation). ... With regard to living things, a body is the integral physical material of an individual. ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ...


Sevi Regis describes inner peace as, "the state or condition of restfulness, harmony, balance, equilibrium, longevity, justice, resolution, timelessness, contentment, freedom, and fulfillment, either individually or simultaneously present, in such a way that it overcomes, demolishes, banishes, and/or replaces everything that opposes it."[citation needed]


Nonviolence and pacifism

Mahatma Gandhi's conception of peace was not as an end, but as a means: "There is no way to peace; peace is the way." Ghandi envisioned nonviolence as a way to make a political statement.[citation needed]Judeo-Christian tradition declares "Thou shalt not kill," although there is no consensus on the most accurate interpretation. “Gandhi” redirects here. ... Judeo-Christian tradition (also spelled Judaeo-Christian) is the body of concepts and values held in common by Christianity and Judaism. ... The Ten Commandments on a monument on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol This 1768 parchment (612x502 mm) by Jekuthiel Sofer emulated 1675 decalogue at the Esnoga synagogue of Amsterdam The Ten Commandments, or Decalogue, are a list of religious and moral imperatives which, according to religious tradition, were... The Ten Commandments on a monument on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol This 1768 parchment (612x502 mm) by Jekuthiel Sofer emulated 1675 decalogue at the Esnoga synagogue of Amsterdam The Ten Commandments, or Decalogue, are a list of religious and moral imperatives which, according to religious tradition, were...


Some religions, such as Jainism, go to great lengths to avoid harming any living creatures, including insects. Pacifists, such as Christian anarchists, perceive any incarnation of violence as self-perpetuating. Other groups take a wide variety of stances, many maintaining a Just War theory. Jain and Jaina redirect here. ... Pacifism is the opposition to war or violence as a means of settling disputes or gaining advantage. ... Christian anarchism is any of several traditions which combine anarchism with Christianity. ... Just War theory is a doctrine of military ethics studied by moral theologians, ethicists and international policy makers which holds that a conflict can and ought to meet the criteria of philosophical, religious or political justice, provided it follows certain conditions. ...


Peace organizations

  • American Friends Service Committee: religious Society of Friends (Quaker) affiliated organization which works for social justice, peace and reconciliation, abolition of the death penalty, and human rights, and provides humanitarian relief.
  • Amnesty International
  • Nonviolent Peaceforce: International NGO engaged in the creation of a large-scale international unarmed peacekeeping force, composed of trained civilians.
  • Pax Christi International: Lay Catholic peace movement
  • Peaceworkers UK: British NGO providing training for potential peaceworkers in nonviolent, civilian techniques of conflict transformation.
  • Seeds of Peace develops and empowers young leaders from regions of conflict to work toward peace through coexistence
  • Spirit of the Sword: a youth initiative active in Wellington, New Zealand between c.1977-1990
  • World Peace Council: International Organization for the struggle for peace.
  • Ulster Project International: International peace-project involving Protestant and Catholic teenagers from Northern Ireland and America.
  • Peacekeeping: personnel units of the United Nations deployed as a way to help countries torn by conflict create conditions for sustainable peace.

American Friends Service Committee logo The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) is a Religious Society of Friends (Quaker) affiliated organization which works for social justice, peace and reconciliation, abolition of the death penalty, and human rights, and provides humanitarian relief. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Amnesty international Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is an international non-governmental organization which defines its mission as to undertake research and action focused on preventing and ending grave abuses of the rights to physical and mental integrity, freedom of conscience... Nonviolent Peaceforce is an international NGO composed of a federation of 94 member organisations from across the world in order to create a trained, international civilian unarmed peace force that can be sent to conflict areas called in by local groups to protect human rights and allow them the space... Pax Christi is an international Catholic peace movement, which nowadays regards itself as ecumenical. ... Violent conflicts around the world are destroying lives and communities on a scale far exceeding that of recent natural disasters. ... Seeds of Peace is an international youth organization, founded in 1993, that works to bring together youngsters from conflict regions and teach them the importance of peace and coexistence. ... Soviet propaganda poster: Peoples of world do not want the hardship of war again! (I. Stalin) The World Peace Council (or World Council of Peace) was formed in 1949 in order to promote peaceful coexistence and nuclear disarmament. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Peacekeeping is a way to help countries torn by conflict create conditions for sustainable peace. ...

See also

The democratic peace theory, liberal peace theory,[1] or simply the democratic peace is a theory and related empirical research in international relations, political science, and philosophy which holds that democracies — usually, liberal democracies — never or almost never go to war with one another. ... Inner peace (or peace of mind) is a colloquialism that refers to a state of being mentally or spiritually at peace, with enough knowledge and understanding to keep oneself strong in the face of discord or stress. ... Moral syncretism consists of the attempt to reconcile disparate or contradictory moral beliefs, often while melding the ethical practices and of various schools of thought. ... Pacifism is the opposition to war or violence as a means of settling disputes or gaining advantage. ... Peace and conflict studies can be defined as the inter-disciplinary inquiry into war as human condition and peace as human potential, as an alternative to the traditional Polemology (War Studies) and the strategies taught at Military academies. ... Mohandas Karamchand “Mahatma” Gandhi, who developed Satyagraha Satyagraha (Sanskrit: सत्याग्रह satyāgraha) is a philosophy and practice of nonviolent resistance developed by Mohandas K. Gandhi. ... “Gandhi” redirects here. ... Genghis Khans empire over time An iterated game originally played in academic groups and by computer simulation for years to study possible strategies of cooperation and aggression. ... Wargaming is the play of simulated military operations in the form of games known as wargames. ... This article is about the general term. ... Economics (deriving from the Greek words οίκω [okos], house, and νέμω [nemo], rules hence household management) is the social science that studies the allocation of scarce resources to satisfy unlimited wants. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... The Childrens Peace Pavilion located at the Community of Christ Auditorium in Independence, Missouri, was established in 1995 to pursue its mission of Enriching the lives of children through the pursuit of peace for all. ... Headquartered in Costa Rica, the United Nations-mandated University for Peace (UPEACE) was established in 1980 as a Treaty Organization by the UN General Assembly. ... The Dayton International Peace Museum is a museum located in Dayton, Ohio at 208 West Monument Avenue. ... The Japanese Peace Bell (cast on October 24, 1952) was a gift of the people of Japan (People of Nippon) to the United Nations on June 8, 1954 (despite that Japan had not yet been admitted to the United Nations). ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ...

Notes

  1. ^ The website of the United States Agency for International Development website states: "Our Work supports long-term and equitable economic growth and advances U.S. foreign policy objectives by supporting: economic growth, agriculture and trade; global health; and democracy, conflict prevention and humanitarian assistance.[1]
  2. ^ Picozzi, Bruno (2007). BIPPI independent pro-peace initiative
  3. ^ A Call for Many Peaces, in: Dietrich/Echavarría/Koppensteiner: Key Texts of Peace Studies, Vienna, LIT Verlag, 2006. pages 282-305.[2]
  4. ^ Ibid.
  5. ^ Ibid.
  6. ^ Tirtha, Swami Sadashiva (2007). Bhagavad Gita for Modern Times (in commentary and translation). New York, USA: Sat Yuga Press. ISBN 978-0-9658042-6-4. 

References

  1. Letter from Birmingham Jail by Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr..
  2. "Pennsylvania, A History of the Commonwealth," esp. pg. 109, edited by Randall M. Miller and William Pencak, The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2002.
  3. Peaceful Societies, Alternatives to Violence and War Short profiles on 25 peaceful societies.
  1. The Path to Peace, by Laure Paquette

Martin Luther King Jr. ...

External links

Find more about Peace on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
Textbooks
Quotations
Source texts
Images and media
News stories
Learning resources
Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Veterans For Peace :: Home (599 words)
This year, Veterans For Peace members across the country stood up for the rights of all Veterans who stand for peace.
The seperate rallies, sponsored by United For Peace and Justice were organized locally and each had their own flare and energy.
Veterans For Peace Chapter 140 is sponsoring their own Veterans Day parade in Meadeville, PA. Contact Sandy at sandkel@earthlink.com if you are interested in participating.
Peace - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2728 words)
Peace may refer specifically to an agreement concluded to end a war, or to a lack of external warfare, or to a period when a country's armies are not fighting enemies.
Peace is not a symbol, peace is a mindset.
Peace movement: social movement that seeks achieve ideals such as the ending of a particular war (or all wars), minimize inter-human violence in a particular place or type of situation, often linked to the goal of achieving world peace.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m