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Encyclopedia > Pavia

Coordinates: 45°11′N, 09°09′E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Comune di Pavia
Coat of arms of Comune di Pavia
Municipal coat of arms
Country Flag of Italy Italy
Region Lombardy
Province Pavia (PV)
Mayor Piera Capitelli (since 2005)
Elevation 77 m
Area 62 km²
Population
 - Total (as of December 31, 2004) 71,486
 - Density 1,146/km²
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 45°11′N, 09°09′E
Gentilic Pavesi
Dialing code 0382
Postal code 27100
Patron St. Sirus
 - Day December 9
Website: www.comune.pavia.it
The Old Bridge (Ponte Vecchio) on the Ticino river is a symbol of Pavia.
San Michele Maggiore.
San Michele Maggiore.
Cathedral of Pavia.
Cathedral of Pavia.
Santa Maria del Carmine.
Santa Maria del Carmine.

Pavia (pronounced Pavìa), the ancient Ticinum, is a town and comune of south-western Lombardy, northern Italy, 35 km south of Milan on the lower Ticino river near its confluence with the Po. It has a population of c. 71,000. Pavia is a 4th class municipality in the province of Iloilo, Philippines. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... Pavia (It. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... Saint Syrus of Pavia was bishop of Pavia during the 1st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 660 KB) Description Subject: Ponte Vecchio (Old Bridge), Pavia (Italy) - (this monument is very often used as a symbol of the town) Author: Giorgio Gonnella User:Ggonnell myself Date: August, 26th, 2003 File links The following pages link to this... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 660 KB) Description Subject: Ponte Vecchio (Old Bridge), Pavia (Italy) - (this monument is very often used as a symbol of the town) Author: Giorgio Gonnella User:Ggonnell myself Date: August, 26th, 2003 File links The following pages link to this... The Ticino River is a tributary of the Po. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 2. ... Façade. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 589 pixelsFull resolution (1394 × 1026 pixel, file size: 308 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) church Santa Maria del Carmine in Pavia, Italy File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 589 pixelsFull resolution (1394 × 1026 pixel, file size: 308 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) church Santa Maria del Carmine in Pavia, Italy File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this... Ticinum (the modern Pavia) is an ancient city of Gallia Transpadana, founded on the banks of the river of the same name (now the Ticino river) a little way above its confluence with the Padus (Po). ... In Italy, the comune, (plural comuni) is the basic administrative unit of both provinces and regions, and may be properly approximated in casual speech by the English word township or municipality. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... The Ticino River is a tributary of the Po. ... The Po (Latin: Padus, Italian: Po) is a river that flows 652 kilometers (405 miles) eastward across northern Italy, from Monviso (in the Cottian Alps) to the Adriatic Sea near Venice. ...


Pavia is the capital of a fertile province known for agricultural products including wine, rice, cereals, and dairy products. Some industries located in the suburbs do not disturb the peaceful atmosphere which comes from the preservation of the city's past and the climate of study and meditation associated with its ancient University. It is the see city of the Roman Catholic diocese of Pavia. Pavia (It. ... A glass of red wine This article is about the alcoholic beverage. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The University of Pavia is a university in Pavia, Italy. ... An Episcopal See is the office of the chief bishop of a particular church. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ...

The Certosa of Pavia.
The Certosa of Pavia.

Contents

Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The church of Certosa di Pavia seen from the Small Cloister. ...

History

For the main article on the Roman city, see Ticinum.

Dating back to pre-Roman times, the town of Pavia (then known as Ticinum) was a municipality and an important military site under the Roman Empire. Ticinum (the modern Pavia) is an ancient city of Gallia Transpadana, founded on the banks of the river of the same name (now the Ticino river) a little way above its confluence with the Padus (Po). ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent. ...


Here, in 476, Odoacer defeated Flavius Orestes after a long siege. To punish the city for helping the rival, Odoacer destroyed it completely. However, Orestes was able to escape to Piacenza, where Odoacer followed and killed him, deposing his son Romulus Augustus. This was commonly considered the end of the Western Roman Empire. Events August - The usurper Basiliscus is deposed and Zeno is restored as Eastern Roman Emperor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Flavius Orestes (d. ... Piacenza (Placentia in Latin and old-fashioned English, Piasëinsa in the local dialect of Emiliano-Romagnolo) is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy. ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus The Western Roman Empire in 395. ...


A late name of the city in Latin was Papia (probably related to the Pope), which evolved to the Italian name Pavia. Sometimes it's been referred to as Ticinum Papia, combining both Latin names. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin...


Under the Goths, Pavia became a fortified citadel and their last bulwark in the war against Belisarius. Invasion of the Goths: a late 19th century painting by O. Fritsche, is a highly romanticized portrait of the Goths as cavalrymen. ... This article is about a type of fortification. ... Belisarius may be the bearded figure on Emperor Justinian Is right in the mosaic in the Church of San Vitale, Ravenna that celebrates the reconquest of Italy, performed by the Byzantine army under the skillful leadership of Belisarius himself. ...


After the Lombards conquest, Pavia became the capital of their kingdom. During the Rule of the Dukes, it was ruled by Zaban. It continued to function as the administrative centre of the kingdom, but by the reign of Desiderius, it had deteriorated as a first-rate defensive work and Charlemagne took it in the Siege of Pavia (June, 774) assuming the kingship of the Lombards. Pavia remained the capital of the Italian Kingdom and the centre of royal coronations until the diminution of imperial authority there in the twelfth century. The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... The Rule of the Dukes was the decade-long interregnum from 574 or 575 which affected the Lombard kingdom in Italy after the death of Cleph. ... Zaban was the Lombard dux (or duke) of Pavia (Ticinum) during the decade-long interregnum known as the Rule of the Dukes (574 – 584). ... Desiderius, the last king of the Lombards, is chiefly known through his connection with Charlemagne. ... Charlemagne and Pippin the Hunchback. ... Combatants Franks Lombards Commanders Charlemagne and Bernard, son of Charles Martel Desiderius The Siege or Battle of Pavia was fought in 773–774 in what is now northern Italy, near Ticinum (modern Pavia), and resulted the victory of Franks under Charlemagne against the Lombards under king Desiderius. ... Events Charlemagne conquers the kingdom of the Lombards, and takes title King of the Lombards. ...


In the 12th century Pavia acquired the status of a self-governing commune. In the political division between Guelphs and Ghibellines that characterizes the Italian Middle Ages, Pavia was traditionally Ghibelline, a position that was as much supported by the rivalry with Milan as it was a mark of the defiance of the Emperor that led the Lombard League against the emperor Frederick Barbarossa, who was attempting to reassert long-dormant Imperial influence over Italy. The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in central and northern Italy during the 12th and 13th centuries. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... The Lombard League was an alliance formed around 1167, which at its apex included most of the cities of northern Italy (although its membership changed in time), including, among others, Milan, Piacenza, Cremona, Mantua, Bergamo, Brescia, Bologna, Padua, Treviso, Vicenza, Verona, Lodi, and Parma, and even some lords, such as... Frederick in a 13th century Chronicle Frederick I (German: Friedrich I. von Hohenstaufen)(1122 – June 10, 1190), also known as Friedrich Barbarossa (Frederick Redbeard) was elected king of Germany on March 4, 1152 and crowned Holy Roman Emperor on June 18, 1155. ...

Side view of the Visconti Castle.
Side view of the Visconti Castle.

In the following centuries Pavia was an important and active town. Under the Treaty of Pavia, Emperor Louis IV granted during his stay in Italy the Palatinate to his brother Duke Rudolph's descendants. Pavia held out against the domination of Milan, finally yielding to the Visconti family, rulers of that city in 1359; under the Visconti Pavia became an intellectual and artistic centre, being the seat from 1361 of the University of Pavia founded around the nucleus of the old school of law, which attracted students from many countries. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 769 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 769 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Castle Visconteo is a castle built in 1360 in the town of Pavia, Lombardia in Italy by Galeazzo II Visconti, soon after the take of the city, a free city-state until then. ... The Treaty of Pavia was signed in Pavia in 1329, which divided the House of Wittelsbach two branches. ... Emperor Louis IV Louis IV of Bavaria (also known as Ludwig the Bavarian) of the House of Wittelsbach (1282 – October 11, 1347) was duke of Bavaria from 1294/1301 together with his brother Rudolf I, also count of the Palatinate until 1329 and, German king since 1314 and crowned as... A palatinate is a territory administered by a count palatine, originally the direct representative of the sovereign, but later the hereditary ruler of the territory subject to the crowns overlordship. ... Rudolf I of Bavaria (October 4, 1274, Basle – August 12, 1319), (German: Rudolf I , Herzog von Bayern, Pfalzgraf bei Rhein), since 1294 he was the Duke of Bavaria, Count Palatine of the Rhine, and a member of the Wittelsbach dynasty. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... Visconti was a noble family that ruled Milan during the Middle Ages and Early Renaissance period. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Orhan I (1326-1359) to Murad I (1359-1389) Berlin joins the Hanseatic League. ... Founding of the University of Pavia, Italy. ... The University of Pavia is a university in Pavia, Italy. ...


The Battle of Pavia (1525) marks a watershed in the city's fortunes, since by that time, the former cleavage between the supporters of the Pope and those of the Holy Roman Emperor had shifted to one between a French party (allied with the Pope) and a party supporting the Emperor and King of Spain Charles V. Thus during the Valois-Habsburg Italian Wars, Pavia was naturally on the Imperial (and Spanish) side. The defeat and capture of king Francis I of France during the battle ushered in a period of Spanish occupation which lasted until 1713. Pavia was then ruled by the Austrians until 1796, when it was occupied by the French army under Napoleon. Combatants France Holy Roman Empire, Spain, Duchy of Milan[1] Commanders Francis I of France Charles de Lannoy, Antonio de Leyva, Georg Frundsberg Strength 17,000 infantry 6,500 cavalry 53 guns 19,000 infantry 4,000 cavalry 17 guns Casualties 12,000 dead or wounded 500 dead or wounded... Events January 21 - The Swiss Anabaptist Movement was born when Conrad Grebel, Felix Manz, George Blaurock, and about a dozen others baptized each other in the home of Manzs mother on Neustadt-Gasse, Zürich, breaking a thousand-year tradition of church-state union. ... Charles V (24 February 1500 – 21 September 1558) was ruler of the Burgundian Netherlands (1506-1555), King of Spain (1516-1556), King of Naples and Sicily (1516-1554), Archduke of Austria (1519-1521), King of the Romans (or German King), (1519-1556 but did not formally abdicate until 1558) and... The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328- 1589. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Combatants France, the Holy Roman Empire, the states of Italy (notably the Republic of Venice, the Duchy of Milan, the Kingdom of Naples, the Papal States, Florence, and the Duchy of Ferrara), England, Scotland, Spain, the Ottoman Empire, the Swiss, Saxony, and others The Italian Wars, often referred to as... Francis I (François Ier in French) (September 12, 1494 – March 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... Year 1713 (MDCCXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from...


In 1815, it again passed under Austrian administration until the Second War of Italian Independence (1859) and the unification of Italy one year later. April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Combatants Second French Empire Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia Austrian Empire Commanders Napoleon III of France Victor Emmanuel II of Savoy Ferencz Graf Gyulai Strength 206,000 242,000 The Second War of Italian Independence, Franco-Austrian War, or Austro-Sardinian War was fought by Napoleon III of France and the... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Italian unification, also known as Risorgimento (resurrection), was a historical process by which the Kingdom of Sardinia (ruled by the Savoy dynasty with Turin as its capital) gradually conquered the Italian peninsula, including the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, the Duchy of Modena, the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, the Duchy...


Main sights

Pavia's most famous landmark is the Certosa, or Carthusian monastery, founded in 1396 and located some kilometers out from the city. Certosa di Pavia is the name of a famous monastery complex in Lombardy, Italy, situated near a small town (in Province of Pavia) with the same name. ... Events September 25 - Bayazid I defeats Sigismund of Hungary and John of Nevers at the Battle of Nicopolis. ...


Among other notable structures are:

  • Cathedral of Pavia (Duomo di Pavia), begun in 1488; however, only by 1898 were the façade and the dome completed according to the original design. The central dome has an octagonal plan, stands 97 m high, and weighs some 20,000 tons. This dome is the third for size in Italy, after St. Peter's Basilica and Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence. Next to the Duomo were the Civic Tower (existing at least from 1330 and enlarged in 1583 by Pellegrino Tibaldi): its fall on March 17, 1989 was the final motivating force that started the last decade's efforts to save the Leaning Tower of Pisa from a similar fate.
  • San Michele Maggiore (St. Michael) is an outstanding example of Lombard-Romanesque church architecture in Lombardy. It is located on the site of a pre-existing Lombard church, which the lower part of the campanile belongs to. Destroyed in 1004, the church was rebuilt from around the end of the 11th century (including the crypt, the transept and the choir), and finished in 1155. It is characterized by an extensive use of sandstone and by a very long transept, provided with a façade and an apse of its own. In the church the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa was incoronated in 1155.
  • Basilica of San Pietro in Ciel d'Oro ("St. Peter in Golden Sky") was begun inthe 6th century), where Saint Augustine, Boethius and the Lombard king Liutprand are buried. The current construction was built in 1132. It is similar to San Michele Maggiore, differentiating for the asymmetric façade with a saingle portal, the use of brickwork instead of sandstone, and, in the interior, the absence of matronei and the shortest transept. The noteworthy arch housing the relics of St. Augustine was built in 1362 by artists from Campione, and is decorated by some 150 statues and reliefs. The church is mentioned by Dante Alighieri in the X canto of his Divine Comedy.
  • S. Teodoro (y.1117), third romanesque basilica in Pavia, though smaller than the former ones. It lays on the slopes leading down to Ticino river and served the fishermen. The apses and the three-level tiburium are a sample of the effective simplicity of romanesque decoration. Inside: two outstanding bird's eye view frescoes of the city (y. 1525) attributed to the painter Bernardino Lanzani. The latter, the definitive release, was stripped off disclosing the unachieved first one. Both are impressively detailed, and the beholder realises how little Pavia urban design has changed in the Last 500 years.
  • the large fortified Castello Visconteo (built in 1360 by Galeazzo II Visconti).
  • the church of Santa Maria del Carmine, one of the most known examples of Gothic brickwork architecture in northern Italy. It is the second largest church in the city after the Cathedral, and is on the Latin cross plan, with a perimeter of 80 x 40 meters comprising a nave and two aisles. The characteristic façade has a large rose window and seven cusps.
  • the Renaissance church of Santa Maria di Canepanova, attributed to Bramante.
  • the University of Pavia was founded in 1361, although a School of Rhetoric is documented since 825. The Centrale Building is a wide block made up by twelve courts of the XV-XIX centuries. The sober façade shifts from barock style to neoclassic. The Big Staircase, the Aula Foscolo, Aula Volta, Aula Scarpa and the Aula Magna are neoclassic too. The Cortile degli Spiriti Magni hosts the statues of some of the most important scholars and alumni. Ancient burial monuments and gravestones of scholars of the XIV-XVI centures are walled up in the Cortile Voltiano (most stem from demolished churches). The Cortile delle Magnolie holds an ancient pit, the Cortile di Ludovico il Moro has a renaissance loggia, and terracotta decorations: both courts, as well as two more, were the cloisters of the ancient Ospedale di San Matteo.
  • The medieval Towers still shape the town skyline. The main clusters still rising are rallied in Piazza Leonardo da Vinci, via Luigi Porta, piazza Collegio Borromeo.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Pavia

The Duomo of Florence, Santa Maria del Fiore Front of Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore the Duomo Duomo is a generic Italian term for a cathedral church. ... The Basilica of Saint Peter, officially known in Italian as the Basilica di San Pietro in Vaticano and commonly called Saint Peters Basilica, is one of four major basilicas of Rome (St. ... The Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore is the cathedral church, or Duomo, of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Florence, noted for its distinctive dome. ... Pellegrino Tibaldi (1527—1596) was an Italian mannerist architect, sculptor, and mural painter. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The Leaning Tower of Pisa (Italian: Torre pendente di Pisa) or simply The Tower of Pisa (La Torre di Pisa) is the campanile, or freestanding bell tower, of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa. ... Façade. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... A campanile (pronounced []) is, especially in Italy, a free-standing bell tower (Italian campana, bell), often adjacent to a church or cathedral. ... Events December: End of the Samanid dynasty in Bokhara. ... Red sandstone interior of Lower Antelope Canyon, Arizona, worn smooth due to erosion by flash flooding over millions of years Sandstone is a sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-size mineral or rock grains. ... Frederick in a 13th century Chronicle Frederick I (German: Friedrich I. von Hohenstaufen)(1122 – June 10, 1190), also known as Friedrich Barbarossa (Frederick Redbeard) was elected king of Germany on March 4, 1152 and crowned Holy Roman Emperor on June 18, 1155. ... Tomb of Boethius in San Pietro in Ciel dOro. ... “Augustinus” redirects here. ... Boethius teaching his students (initial in a 1385 Italian manuscript of the Consolation of Philosophy). ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... Liutprand was the king of the Lombards from 712 to 744 and is chiefly remembered for his Donation of Sutri, in 728, and his long reign which brought him into conflicts, mostly successful, with most of Italy at some time or other. ... Flemish bond. ... Red sandstone interior of Lower Antelope Canyon, Arizona, worn smooth due to erosion by flash flooding over millions of years Sandstone is a sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-size mineral or rock grains. ... Cathedral ground plan. ... Map showing the location of the Campione enclave near the center. ... Dante in a fresco series of famous men by Andrea del Castagno, ca. ... Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, in Michelinos fresco. ... San Teodoro. ... The Ticino River is a tributary of the Po. ... Galeazzo II (d. ... Interior of Cologne Cathedral Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... The rose window in Bristol Cathedral, Bristol, England, at the western end of the nave. ... Donato Bramante Donato Bramante (1444 - March 11, 1514), Italian architect, who introduced the Early Renaissance style to Milan and the High Renaissance style to Rome, where his most famous design was St. ... The University of Pavia is a university in Pavia, Italy. ... Founding of the University of Pavia, Italy. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Natives of Pavia

Benedetto Cairoli (January 28, 1825 – August 8, 1889) was an Italian statesman. ... Gerolamo Cardano. ... Carlo Maria Cipolla (1922-2000) was an Italian economic historian. ... Claudia Muzio (1889 - 1936) was an Italian opera singer. ...

Lived in Pavia


  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: University of Pavia (0 words)
Pavia was, even in Roman times, a literary centre (Ennodius); as the capital of the Lombard kingdom it had its "grammar" schools, and Emperor Lothair erected a "central" school there (825).
Until 1361 there was no Studium Generale at Pavia; whoever sought legal
Memorie e documenti per la storia dell' Università di Pavia (Pavia, 1878); DENIFLE, Die Universitäten des Mittelalters, I, 572, sqq.; Cenni storici sulla R. Università di Pavia (Pavia, 1873).
Diocese of Pavia (984 words)
Pavia is the ancient Ticinum, founded by the Lievi and Marici, two Ligurian peoples; at a date not well determined it came under Roman power, and was given to the Papia tribe, whence the name of Papia, which, however, does not occur before the time of Paulus Diaconus.
Pavia resisted Alboin, King of the Lombards, for three years, and then became the capital of the Lombard Kingdom, and when it was taken from the Lombards by Charlemagne (battles of Pavia of 754, 755, and 774), it remained the capital of the Kingdom of Italy, where the diets of that realm were held.
Pavia is the birthplace of: the historian Liutprand, Bishop of Cremona; St. Bernardo Balbi, a collector of decretals; the painter Andreino d'Edesia, a contemporary of Giotto; the canon Zanella, inventor of the bassoon.
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