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Encyclopedia > Paul Scott

Paul Mark Scott (25 March 19201 March 1978) was a British novelist, playwright, and poet, best known for his monumental tetralogy the Raj Quartet. His novel Staying On won the Booker Prize for 1977. March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is someone who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... A poet is some one who writes poetry. ... A tetralogy is a compound work that is made up of four (numerical prefix tetra-) distinct works. ... The Raj Quartet is a four-volume novel, written by Paul Scott, about the concluding years of the British Raj in India. ... The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, also known as the Man Booker Prize, or simply the Man Booker, is one of the worlds most important literary prizes, and awarded each year for the best original novel written by a citizen of the Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland in... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ...

Contents


Early life

Paul Scott was born in Southgate, north London, the younger of two sons. His father, Thomas, was a Yorkshireman who moved to London in the 1920s and was a commercial artist specialising in furs and lingerie. His mother, Frances, was from south London. In later life Scott differentiated between his mother’s creative drive and his father’s down to earth practicality. Southgate is an area in the London Borough of Enfield. ... London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England and is the most populous city in the European Union. ... The White Yorkshire rose. ... Drawing is one way of making an image: it is the process of making marks on a surface by applying pressure from or moving a tool on the surface. ...


He was educated at Winchmore Hill Collegiate School (a private school) but was forced to leave suddenly, and without any qualifications, when 14, at a time that his father’s business was in severe financial difficulty. He worked as an accounts clerk for CT Payne and took evening classes in bookkeeping. He started writing poetry in his spare time. It was in this environment that he came to understand the rigid social divisions of suburban London, so that when he went to British India he had an instinctive familiarity with how it worked. Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Accountancy (British English) or accounting (American English) is the process of maintaining, auditing, and processing financial information for business purposes. ... Poetry (from Ancient Greek: (poiéo/poió) = I create / I make / I do / I cause) is traditionally a written art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... A social class is, at its most basic, a group of people that have similar social status. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... British India (otherwise known as The British Raj) was a historical period during which most of the Indian subcontinent, or present-day India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Myanmar, were under the colonial authority of the British Empire (Undivided India). ...


Military service

He was called up (conscripted) in to the army as a private in early 1940 near the start of World War II and was assigned to Intelligence Corps. He met and married his wife, Penny, in Torquay in 1941. Army (from French armée) can, in some countries, refer to any armed force. ... A private is a military soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... Combatants Allies: Poland, British Commonwealth, France/Free France, Soviet Union, United States, China, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, and others Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8 million Civilian dead: 4 million Total dead: 12 million World War II... Intelligence Corps camp flag The Intelligence Corps (often called Int Corps) is one of the corps of the British Army, responsible for gathering, analysing and disseminating military intelligence and also for counter-intelligence and security. ... Marriage is a relationship that plays a key role in the definition of many families. ... Marriage is a relationship that plays a key role in the definition of many families. ... Location within the British Isles Torquay Pavilion, with St Johns Church in the background. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ...


In 1943 he was posted as an Officer Cadet to India, where he was commissioned. He ended the war as a Captain in the Indian Army Service Corps organizing logistics for the Fourteenth Army’s reconquest of Burma, which had fallen to the Japanese in 1942. Despite being initially appalled by the attitudes of the British, the heat and dust, the disease and poverty and the sheer numbers of people, he, like so many others, fell deeply in love with India. 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... Officer Cadet is a rank held by military cadets during their training to become commissioned officers. ... An officer is a member of a military service who holds a position of responsibility. ... Captain is both a nautical term and a rank in various uniformed organizations. ... Look up Logistics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The British Fourteenth Army, in spite of its name, was a multinational force: most of its units were from the Indian Army and there were also significant contributions from East African divisions within the British Army. ... This article is about the year. ...


After demobilisation in 1946 he was employed as an accountant for two small publishing houses and remained until 1950. His two daughters (Carol and Sally) were born in 1947 and 1948. In 1950 Scott moved to the literary agent Pearn Pollinger and Higham (later to be known as David Higham Associates) and subsequently became a director. Whilst there he was responsible for representing Arthur C Clarke, Morris West, M M Kaye and Muriel Spark amongst others. Demobilization is the process of standing down a nations armed forces from combat-ready status. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Accountancy (British English) or accounting (American English) is the process of maintaining, auditing, and processing financial information for business purposes. ... 1. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Note: Daughters is also a band. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... A literary agent represents writers and their written work to publishers and film producers, and assists in the sale and deal negotiation of the same. ... Arthur C. Clarke, considered by many to be a grand master of science fiction and communication satellites Sir Arthur Charles Clarke (born December 16, 1917) is a British author and inventor, probably most famous for his science fiction novel 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Morris West Morris Langlo West (April 26, 1916 - October 9, 1999) was an Australian writer. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Writing career

Scott published his first novel Johnny Sahib in 1952 (after seventeen rejections) to modest success. He continued to write and have published a novel every year or so and in 1960 decided to try to survive as a full time author. Publishing is the activity of putting information in the public arena. ... Daniel Defoes Robinson Crusoe; title page of 1719 newspaper edition A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended fictional narrative in prose. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... A full time job usually has benefits (such as health insurance) and are often considered careers. ...


His novels until this time had tended to draw on his experiences of India and service in the armed forces with strong sub texts of uneasy relationships between male friends or brothers. However in 1962, Birds of Paradise, which continued these themes, was not a success and Scott recognised that he had to look for alternative sources of inspiration. His next two novels, The Bender and The Corrida at San Feliu, are a clear attempt to experiment with new forms and locales. However neither was successful, either financially or artistically. The armed forces of a state are its government sponsored defense and fighting forces and organizations. ... See: relational model personal relationship mathematical relationship, including: inverse relationship direct relationship relation (mathematics). ... Brothers is either: The plural of brother Brothers, Oregon Wagga Brothers Rugby League Football Club The feeling that men should Treat_one_another_as_brothers This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... For the flowering plant of this name, see Strelitzia Genera Cicinnurus Diphyllodes Epimachus Lophorina Manucodia Paradisaea Parotia Ptiloris Seleucidis Lesser Bird of Paradise Paradisaea minor (c)Roderick Eime The birds of paradise are members of the family Paradisaeidae of the order Passeriformes, found in Oceania. ...


Scott flew to India in 1964 to see old friends and recharge his batteries. Artistically he was drained and felt a failure, feelings that were reinforced by being financially desperate and physically weak. Scott had suffered from amoebic dysentery since serving in India and had managed to handle it by what his biographer, Hilary Spurling, describes as “alarming” quantities of alcohol. The condition was exacerbated by the visit and he had to undergo painful and debilitating treatment. Amoebic Dysentery is a goregrind band from Atlanta, Georgia, specially, East Cobb County. ... Hilary Spurling (born 1940) is a British writer, known as a journalist and biographer. ... In chemistry, an alcohol is any organic compound in which a hydroxyl group (-OH) is bound to a carbon atom of an alkyl or substituted alkyl group. ...


In June 1964, Scott began to write The Jewel in the Crown, the first novel of what was to become the Raj Quartet. It was published in 1966 to minor and muted enthusiasm. The remaining novels in the sequence were published over the next nine years – The Day of the Scorpion (1968), The Towers of Silence (1971) and The Division of the Spoils (1974). Scott wrote in relative isolation and only visited India twice during the genesis of the Raj Quartet. He worked in an upstairs room at his home in Hampstead overlooking the garden and Hampstead Garden Suburb woodland – a far view from Mayapore. He supplemented his earnings from his books with writing reviews for The Times, the Times Literary Supplement, New Statesman and Country Life. 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... The Jewel in the Crown is a British television drama series produced by Granada Television for ITV and based on the Raj Quartet novels by Paul Scott. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... The Day of the Scorpion is the 1968 novel by Paul Scott that continues his Raj Quartet. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... The Towers of Silence is the 1971 novel by Paul Scott that continues his Raj Quartet. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1974 calendar). ... Hampstead is a place in the London Borough of Camden and is close to Hampstead Heath. ... Hampstead Garden Suburb is an example of early 20th Century domestic architecture and town planning located in the London Borough of Barnet in North West London. ... The Jewel in the Crown (1984) is a British television mini series about the final days of the British Raj in India during World War II, based upon the Raj Quartet novels by Paul Scott. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1785, and under the name The Times since 1788; it is the original Times newspaper. ... The Times Literary Supplement (or TLS) is a weekly literary review published in London by News International, a subsidiary of News Corporation. ... The New Statesman is a left-of-centre political weekly published in London. ... Country Life can refer to: Country Life (magazine) Country Life (album) - by Roxy Music This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


In 1976 and 1977 he was visiting Professor at the University of Tulsa, Oklahoma. His coda to the Raj Quartet, Staying On, was published in 1977 just before his second visit. Soon after its publication, and while he was in Tulsa, Scott was diagnosed with cancer. 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1976 calendar). ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... A professor is a senior teacher and researcher, usually in a college or university. ... The University of Tulsa is a private, comprehensive university awarding bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees located in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Coda sign Coda (Italian for tail; from the Latin cauda), in music, is a passage which brings a movement or a separate piece to a conclusion through prolongation. ... it is carsenogetic and is found is pens in pauls pencil case, toilet paper and tissues When normal cells are damaged beyond repair, they are eliminated by apoptosis. ...


At the time of their publication, the Raj Quartet were, individually and collectively, received with little enthusiasm. Only Staying On achieved success with the award of the Booker Prize in 1977. Sadly Scott was too ill to attend the presentation in November. He died at the Middlesex Hospital, London on 1 March 1978. March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ...


Scott stated that “For me, the British Raj is an extended metaphor [and] I don’t think a writer chooses his metaphors. They choose him.” From his earliest experiences in north London, he felt himself an outsider in his own country. As his biographer comments, The British Empire at its zenith in 1919. ...

Probably only an outsider could have commanded the long, lucid perspectives he brought to bear on the end of the British raj, exploring with passionate, concentrated attention a subject still generally treated as taboo, or fit only for historical romance and adventure stories. However Scott saw things other people would sooner not see, and he looked too close for comfort. His was a bleak, stern, prophetic vision and, like Forster's, it has come to seem steadily more accurate with time. E. M. Forster as a young man in about 1905 E.M. Forster should not be confused with C. S. Forester, author of the Horatio Hornblower novels. ...

The Jewel in the Crown has at its heart the confrontation between Hari Kumar, the young, England-raised Indian liberal, and the police superintendent Ronald Merrick who both hates and is attracted to Kumar and seeks to destroy him after Daphne Manners, the English girl who is in love with Kumar and has been courted by Merrick, is raped. Critics have seen this conflict as one fundamentally influenced by Scott’s own deeply-divided bisexual nature, with Kumar representing everything young, bright, and forward-looking that had been brutally crushed in Scott’s own youth. Is Merrick, a repressed homosexual with authoritarian leanings and an arrogant sense of his own racial standing a portrait of Scott in later life, or is he based on the strong authority figure in his life – his mother? Whatever the inspiration, the result is widely seen as a substantial, and to date definitive, exploration of the underbelly of the Raj in India. Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Bisexual redirects here. ... Since its coinage, the word homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... The term authoritarian is used to describe an organization or a state which enforces strong and sometimes oppressive measures against the population, generally without attempts at gaining the consent of the population. ... Supremacism is the belief that ones race or religion is the supreme, and that those of other distinctions are (by various arbitrary criteria) unfit for social or religious interaction, and sexual reproduction. ...


In 1980 Granada Television filmed Staying On, with Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson as Tusker Smalley and his wife Lucy, famously advertised at the time as “Reunited for the first time since Brief Encounter”. The success of its first showing on British television in December 1980 encouraged Granada Television to embark on the much greater project of making The Raj Quartet into a major fourteen part television series known as The Jewel in the Crown first broadcast in the UK in early 1984. In 2001 the British Film Institute voted it as 22nd in the all time best British television programmes. It has also been adapted as a 9-part BBC Radio 4 dramatisation under its original title in 2005. 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Current ITV Granada logo A Granada TV logo from the black and white era. ... Trevor Howard Trevor Howard CBE (September 29, 1913 - January 7, 1988) was a British actor. ... Dame Celia Johnson (1908-1982) was an English actress, famous for her role in the 1945 film, Brief Encounter, opposite Trevor Howard. ... Brief Encounter (1945) is a British film directed by David Lean starring Celia Johnson and Trevor Howard. ... The Jewel in the Crown is a British television drama series produced by Granada Television for ITV and based on the Raj Quartet novels by Paul Scott. ... The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to encourage the development of the arts of film, television and the moving image throughout the United Kingdom, to promote their use as a record of contemporary life and manners, to promote education about film, television and... BBC Radio 4 is a British domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of chiefly spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

  • Mishra, Pankaj (ed.). "Paul Scott." India in Mind: An Anthology. New York: Vintage Books, 2005: 275-289.
  • Spurling H. Paul Scott: a life. London: Hutchinson, 1990.

External links

  • Paul Scott Collection at Tulsa University, Oklahoma
  • Paul Scott Collection at Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center University of Texas at Austin,

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