FACTOID # 11: Oklahoma has the highest rate of women in State or Federal correctional facilities.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Paul Scarron
French Literature

By category
Image File history File links Download high resolution version (663x784, 183 KB) description: Paul Scarron source: http://bpun. ... French literature is, generally speaking, literature written in the French language, particularly by citizens of France; it may also refer to literature written by people living in France who speak other traditional non-French languages. ...

French Literary History

Medieval
16th Century - 17th Century
18th Century -19th Century
20th Century - Contemporary Medieval French literature is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in Oïl languages (including Old French and early Middle French) during the period from the eleventh century to the end of the fifteenth century. ... French Renaissance literature is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in French (Middle French) from the French invasion of Italy in 1494 to 1600, or roughly the period from the reign of Charles VIII of France to the ascention of Henri IV of France to the throne. ... Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) French literature of the Seventeenth Century encompases the reigns of Henry IV of France, the Regency of Marie de Medici, Louis XIII of France, the Regency of Anne of Austria (during which the civil war called the Fronde occurred... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

French Writers

Chronological list
Writers by category
Novelists - Playwrights
Poets - Essayists
Short Story Writers List of French speaking authors Jean Anouilh (1910 - 1987) Antonin Artaud (1896 - 1948) Honoré de Balzac (1799 - 1850) Charles-Pierre Baudelaire (April 9, 1821 - August 31, 1867), (Les fleurs du mal, 1857) Simone de Beauvoir (1908 - 1986) Cyrano de Bergerac (March 6, 1619 - 1655) Pierre-Jean de Béranger (1780...

France Portal
Literature Portal

Paul Scarron (c. July, 1610 - October 6, 1660), French poet, dramatist, novelist and husband of Madame de Maintenon, was baptized on July 4 1610. July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... // Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ... October 6 is the 279th day of the year (280th in Leap years). ... Events Expulsion of the Carib indigenous people from Martinique by French occupying forces. ... Poets are authors of poems, or of other forms of poetry such as dramatic verse. ... A dramatist is an author of dramatic compositions, usually plays. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Françoise dAubigné, marquise de Maintenon Françoise dAubigné, marquise de Maintenon (November 27, 1635 - April 15, 1719), the second wife of Louis XIV, was born in a prison at Niort. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ...


His father, of the same name, was a member of the parlement of Paris. Paul the younger became an abbé when he was nineteen, and in 1633 entered the service of Charles de Beaumanoir, bishop of Le Mans, with whom he travelled to Rome in 1635. Finding a patron in Marie de Hautefort, he became a well-known figure in literary and fashionable society. An improbable story is told on the authority of La Beaumelle (Mémoires ... de Mme de Maintenon) that--when in residence at his canonry of Le Mans--he once tarred and feathered himself as a carnival freak and, being obliged to take refuge from popular wrath in a swamp, was crippled from rheumatism. Parlements (pronounced in French) in ancien régime France — contrary to what their name would suggest to the modern reader — were not democratic or political institutions, but law courts . ... Le Mans is a city in France, located at the Sarthe River. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Democratici di Sinistra) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,546,807 almost 4,000,000 1... Le Mans is a city in France, located at the Sarthe River. ... Rheumatism or Rheumatic disorder is a non-specific term for medical problems affecting the bones and joints. ...


What is certain is that Scarron, after having been in perfect health for nearly thirty years, passed twenty more in a state of miserable deformity and pain. His head and body were twisted, and his legs became useless. He bore up against his sufferings with invincible courage, though his circumstances were further complicated by a series of lawsuits with his stepmother over his father's property, and by the poverty and misconduct of his sisters, whom he supported. Scarron returned to Paris in 1640, and in 1643 appeared a Recueil de quelques vers burlesques, and in the next year Typhon ou la gigantomachie. At Le Mans he had conceived the idea of the Roman comique, the first part of which was printed in 1651.


In 1645 was performed the comedy of Jodelet, ou le maître valet, the name of which was derived from the actor who took the principal part. Jodelet was the first of many French plays in which the humour depends on the valet who takes the part of master, an idea that Scarron borrowed from the Spanish. After a short visit to Le Mans in 1646, he returned to Paris, and worked hard for the bookseller Quinet, calling his works his "marquisat de Quinet." He had also a pension from Fouquet, and one from the queen, which was withdrawn because he was suspected of Frondeur sentiments. When Mazarin received the dedication of Typhon coldly, Scarron changed it to a burlesque on the minister. In 1651 he definitely took the side of the Fronde in a Mazarinade, a violent pamphlet. He now had no resources but his "marquisat." // Events January 10 - Archbishop Laud executed on Tower Hill, London. ... Nicolas Fouquet (1615 — March 23, 1680) was viscount of Melun and of Vaux, marquis de Belle-Isle, superintendent of finance in France under Louis XIV. Born in Paris, he belonged to an influential family of the noblesse de robe, and after some preliminary schooling with the Jesuits, at the age... The Fronde (1648–1653) was a civil war in France, followed by the Franco-Spanish War (1653–1659). ... Cardinal Jules Mazarin, French diplomat and statesman Jules Mazarin, born Giulio Raimondo Mazzarino; but best known as Cardinal Mazarin (July 14, 1602 – March 9, 1661) served as the chief minister of France from 1642, until his death. ...


In his early years he had been something of a libertine. In 1649 a penniless lady of good family, Céleste Palaiseau, kept his house in the Rue d'Enfer, and tried to reform the gay company which assembled there. But in 1652, sixteen years after he had become almost entirely paralysed, he married a girl of much beauty and no fortune, Françoise d'Aubigné, afterwards famous as Madame de Maintenon. Scarron had long been able to endure life only by the aid of constant doses of opium, and he died on the 6th of October 1660. Opium is a narcotic drug which is obtained from the unripe seed pods of the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L. or the synonym paeoniflorum). ...


Scarron's work is very abundant and very unequal. The piece most famous in his own day, his Virgile travesti (1648-1653), is now thought a somewhat ignoble waste of singular powers for burlesque. But the Roman comique (1651-1657) is a work the merit of which is denied by no competent judge. Unfinished, and a little desultory, this history of a troop of strolling actors is almost the first French novel, in point of date, which shows real power of painting manners and character, and is singularly vivid. It is in the style of the Spanish picaresque romance, and furnished Théophile Gautier with the idea and with some of the details of his Capitaine Fracasse. Scarron also wrote some shorter novels: La Precaution inutile, which inspired Sedaine's Gageure imprévue; Les Hypocrites, to which Tartuffe owes something, and others. Of his plays Jodelet (1645) and Don Japhel d'Arménie (1653) are the best. Pierre Jules Théophile Gautier (August 31, 1811 – October 23, 1872) was a French poet, dramatist, novelist, journalist and literary critic. ...


The most complete edition of his works is by La Martiniére, 1737 (10 vols., Amsterdam). The Roman comique and the Enéide Travestie were edited by Victor Fournel in 1857 and 1858. Among the contemporary notices of Scarron, that contained in the Historielles of Tallemant des Réaux is the most accurate. The most important modern works on the subject are Scarron et le genre burlesque (1888) by Paul Morillot; a biography by Jean Jules Jusserand in English, prefixed to his edition of The Comical Romance and other tales by Paul Scarron, done into English by Tom Brown, John Savage and others (2 vols., 1892); and Paul Scarron et Françoise d'Aubigné d'après des documents nouveaux (1894) by A de Boislisle. Gedeon Tallemant, Sieur Des Réaux (November 7, 1619 - November 6, 1692), was a French author. ... Jean Adrien Antoine Jules Jusserand (February 18, 1855 - July 18, 1932) was a French author and diplomatist. ...


Reference

(Redirected from 1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica) The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...

External links

  • Biography, Bibliography (in French)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Paul Scarron - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (735 words)
Paul the younger became an abbé when he was nineteen, and in 1633 entered the service of Charles de Beaumanoir, bishop of Le Mans, with whom he travelled to Rome in 1635.
Scarron returned to Paris in 1640, and in 1643 appeared a Recueil de quelques vers burlesques, and in the next year Typhon ou la gigantomachie.
Scarron had long been able to endure life only by the aid of constant doses of opium, and he died on the 6th of October 1660.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m