FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Paul Ricoeur
Western Philosophers
20th-century philosophy
Paul Ricoeur
Name: Paul Ricoeur
Birth: February 27, 1913
Death: May 20, 2005
School/tradition: Continental Philosophy, Analytic Philosophy, Phenomenology, Hermeneutics, Psychoanalysis, Christian Theology
Main interests: Phenomenology, Moral philosophy, Political Philosophy, Philosophy of Language, Personal Identity, Historiography
Notable ideas: Hermeneutics, Philosophy of action, Narrative identity
Influences: Heidegger, Jaspers, Gadamer, Aristotle, Kant, Husserl, Hannah Arendt, Emmanuel Levinas

Paul Ricœur (February 27, 1913 Valence FranceMay 20, 2005 Chatenay Malabry France) was a French philosopher best known for combining phenomenological description with hermeneutic interpretation. As such, he is connected to two other major hermeneutic phenomenologists, Martin Heidegger and Hans-Georg Gadamer. It has been suggested that Contemporary philosophy be merged into this article or section. ... Image File history File links Ricoeur_paul. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Continental philosophy is a term used in philosophy to designate one of two major traditions of modern Western philosophy. ... Analytic philosophy is a generic term for a style of philosophy that came to prominence during the 20th Century. ... This article is about the philosophical movement. ... Hermeneutics may be described as the development and study of theories of the interpretation and understanding of texts. ... Psychoanalysis is a family of psychological theories and methods based on the work of Sigmund Freud. ... Christian theology is reasoned discourse concerning Christian faith. ... This article is about the philosophical movement. ... Ethics is a general term for what is often described as the science (study) of morality. In philosophy, ethical behavior is that which is good or right. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political philosophy is the study of fundamental questions about the state, government, politics, liberty, justice, property, rights, law and the enforcement of a legal code by authority: what they are, why (or even if) they are needed, what makes a government legitimate, what... Philosophy of language is the reasoned inquiry into the nature, origins, and usage of language. ... In philosophy, the issue of personal identity concerns the conditions under which a person at one time is the same person at another time. ... [<br /> ---- Julius Caesar was born in the year 100 BC] Historiography is a term with multiple meanings that has changed with time, place and observer, and is thus resistant to a single encompassing meaning. ... Martin Heidegger Martin Heidegger (September 26, 1889 &#8211; May 26, 1976) was a German philosopher. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Hans-Georg Gadamer (February 11, 1900 – March 13, 2002) was a German philosopher best known for his 1960 magnum opus, Truth and Method (Wahrheit und Methode). ... Aristotle (Greek: AristotélÄ“s) (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... Immanuel Kant Immanuel Kant (April 22, 1724 &#8211; February 12, 1804) was a Prussian philosopher, generally regarded as one of Europes most influential thinkers and the last major philosopher of the Enlightenment. ... Edmund Husserl Edmund Gustav Albrecht Husserl (April 8, 1859 - April 26, 1938), philosopher, was born into a Jewish family in Prossnitz, Moravia (Prostejov, Czech Republic), Empire of Austria-Hungary. ... Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906 – December 4, 1975) was a Jewish-German (later American) political theorist. ... Emmanuel Levinas (January 12, 1906 - December 25, 1995) was a Jewish philosopher originally from Kaunas in Lithuania, who moved to France where he wrote most of his works in French. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Location within France Champs de Mars and Kiosque Peynet in Valence A World War I memorial in Valence ville Valence is a commune in south-eastern France, the capital of the département of Drôme, situated on the left bank of the Rhône, 65 miles south of Lyon... May 20 is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Châtenay-Malabry is a city in France, in the southern suburbs of Paris, on the left bank of the Seine. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... This article is about the philosophical movement. ... Hermeneutics may be described as the development and study of theories of the interpretation and understanding of texts. ... Martin Heidegger (September 26, 1889 – May 26, 1976) (pronounced ) was a highly influential German philosopher. ... Hans-Georg Gadamer Hans-Georg Gadamer (February 11, 1900 – March 13, 2002) was a German philosopher best known for his 1960 magnum opus, Truth and Method (Wahrheit und Methode). ...

Contents

Biography

Ricœur was born in a devout Protestant family, making him a member of a religious minority in Catholic France. Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...


Ricoeur's father died in a 1915 World War I battle when Ricœur was only two years old. He was raised by an aunt in Rennes with a small stipend afforded to him as a war orphan. Ricœur, whose penchant for study was fueled by his family's Protestant emphasis on Bible study, was bookish and intellectually precocious. Ricœur received his license in 1933 from the University of Rennes and began studying philosophy at the Sorbonne in 1934, where he was influenced by Gabriel Marcel. In 1935, he was awarded the agrégation in philosophy, with the second highest mark in the nation and presaging a bright future. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Some medieval houses, such as these at Champ-Jacquet, can still be found in the center of Rennes. ... A stipend is a form of payment or salary, such as for an internship or apprenticeship. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: ) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganised as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... Gabriel Honoré Marcel (December 7, 1889 Paris – October 8, 1973 Paris) was a French philosopher, a leading Christian existentialist, and the author of about 30 plays. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... In France, the agrégation is a civil service competitive examination for some positions in the public education system. ...


WWII interrupted Ricœur's career, and he was drafted to serve in the French army in 1939. His unit was captured during the German invasion of France in 1940 and he spent the next five years as a prisoner of war. His detention camp was filled with other intellectuals such as Mikel Dufrenne who organized readings and classes sufficiently rigorous that the camp was accredited as a degree-granting institution by the Vichy government. During this time he read Karl Jaspers, who was to have a great influence on him. He also began a translation of Edmund Husserl's Ideas I. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Mikel Dufrenne (1910-1995) was a French philosopher and aesthetician. ... Vichy (Occitan: Vichèi) is a French commune, situated in the département of Allier and the région of Auvergne. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Edmund Gustav Albrecht Husserl (April 8, 1859, ProstÄ›jov – April 26, 1938, Freiburg) was a German philosopher, known as the father of phenomenology. ...


Ricœur taught at the University of Strasbourg 1948-56, the only French university with a Protestant faculty of theology. In 1950 he received his doctorate submitting (as is customary in France) two theses: a "minor" thesis translating Husserl's Ideas I into French for the first time, with commentary, and a "major" thesis that he would later publish as Le Volontaire et l'Involontaire. Ricœur soon acquired a reputation as an expert on phenomenology, whose popularity in France had begun during the 1930s and increased during and after the war, thanks to the work of Merleau-Ponty and Emmanuel Levinas. The University Palace in Strasbourg, and a monument to one of the universitys students, Johann Wolfgang Goethe The University of Strasbourg in Strasbourg, Alsace, France, is divided into three separate institutions. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... This article is about the philosophical movement. ... Maurice Merleau-Ponty (March 14, 1908 - May 4, 1961) was a French phenomenologist philosopher, strongly influenced by Edmund Husserl, and often somewhat mistakenly classified as an existentialist thinker because of his close association with Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, and his distinctly Heideggerian conception of Being. ... Emmanuel Levinas (January 12, 1906 - December 25, 1995) was a Jewish philosopher originally from Kaunas in Lithuania, who moved to France where he wrote most of his works in French. ...


In 1956 Ricœur took up a position at the Sorbonne as the Chair of General Philosophy. This appointment signaled Ricœur's emergence as one of France's most prominent philosophers. While at the Sorbonne, he wrote Fallible Man and The Symbolism of Evil published in 1960, and Freud and Philosophy: Essays on Interpretation published in 1965. These works cemented his reputation. 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: ) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganised as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ...


From 1965 to 1970, Ricœur was an administrator at the newly founded University of Nanterre in suburban Paris. Nanterre was intended an experiment in progressive education, and Ricœur hoped that here he could create a university in accordance with his vision, free of the stifling atmosphere of the tradition-bound Sorbonne and its overcrowded classes. Nevertheless, Nanterre became a hotbed of protest during the student uprisings of May 1968. Ricœur was assaulted by a student mob, and derided as an "old clown" and tool of the French government. 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... The University of Paris X: Nanterre is a university in France. ... A May 1968 poster: Be young and shut up, with stereotypical silhouette of General de Gaulle. ...


Disenchanted with French academic life, Ricœur taught briefly at the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium, before taking a position at the Divinity School of the University of Chicago, where he taught 1970-85. Thus Ricœur belatedly discovered American philosophy and social science, becoming one of the few intellectuals well acquainted with the three major intellectual scenes: French, German, and Anglo-American. This culminated in his The Rule of Metaphor: Multi-disciplinary Studies of the Creation of Meaning of Language published in 1975 and the three-volume Time and Narrative published in 1984, 1985, and 1988. Ricoeur gave the Gifford Lectures in 1985-86, published in 1992 as Oneself as Another. This work built on his discussion of narrative identity and his continuing interest in the self. The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ...


Thanks to Time and Narrative, Ricœur returned to France in 1985 as an intellectual superstar. His late work was characterised by a continuing cross-cutting of national intellectual traditions; for example, some of his latest writing engaged the thought of the American political philosopher John Rawls. John Rawls (February 21, 1921 – November 24, 2002) was an American philosopher, a professor of political philosophy at Harvard University and author of A Theory of Justice (1971), Political Liberalism, Justice as Fairness: A Restatement, and The Law of Peoples. ...


On November 29, 2004, he was awarded with the second John W. Kluge Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Human Sciences (shared with Jaroslav Pelikan). The John W. Kluge Prize in the Human Sciences will be awarded for lifetime achievement in the humanistic and social sciences to celebrate the importance of the Intellectual Arts for the public interest. ... Jaroslav Jan Pelikan (17 December 1923 – 13 May 2006) was one of the worlds leading scholars in the history of Christianity and medieval intellectual history. ...


Paul Ricœur died in his house of natural causes. French Prime Minister Jean Pierre Raffarin declared that "the humanist European tradition is in mourning for one of its most talented exponents". Jean-Pierre Raffarin (born August 3, 1948) is a French conservative politician. ...


Bibliography

  • Gabriel Marcel and Karl Jaspers. Philosophie du mystère et philosophie du paradoxe. Paris: Temps Présent, 1948.
  • Entretiens sur l'Art et la Psychanalyse (sous la direction de Andre Berge, Anne Clancier, Paul Ricoeur et Lothar-Henry Rubinstein) (1964), Mouton, Paris, La Haye 1968.
  • Freedom and Nature: The Voluntary and the Involuntary, trans. Erazim Kohak. Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1966 (1950).
  • History and Truth, trans. Charles A. Kelbley. Evanston: Northwestern University press. 1965 (1955).
  • Fallible Man, trans. with an introduction by Walter J. Lowe, New York: Fordham University Press, 1986 (1960).
  • The Symbolism of Evil, trans. Emerson Buchanan. New York: Harper and Row, 1967 (1960).
  • Freud and Philosophy: An Essay on Interpretation, trans. Denis Savage. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1970 (1965).
  • The Conflict of Interpretations: Essays in Hermeneutics, ed. Don Ihde, trans. Willis Domingo et al. Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1974 (1969).
  • Political and Social Essays, ed. David Stewart and Joseph Bien, trans. Donald Stewart et al. Athens: Ohio University Press, 1974.
  • The Rule of Metaphor: Multi-Disciplinary Studies in the Creation of Meaning in Language, trans. Robert Czerny with Kathleen McLaughlin and John Costello, S. J., London: Routledge and Kegan Paul 1978 (1975).
  • Interpretation Theory: Discourse and the Surplus of Meaning. Fort Worth: Texas Christian Press, 1976.
  • The Philosophy of Paul Ricœur: An Anthology of his Work, ed. Charles E. Reagan and David Stewart. Boston: Beacon Press, 1978.
  • Theology after Ricœur, Dan Stiver, Westminster: John Knox Press
  • Essays on Biblical Interpretation (Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1980)
  • Hermeneutics and the Human Sciences: Essays on Language, Action and Interpretation, ed., trans. John B. Thompson. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981.
  • Time and Narrative (Temps et Récit), 3 vols. trans. Kathleen McLaughlin and David Pellauer. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984, 1985, 1988 (1983, 1984, 1985).
  • Lectures on Ideology and Utopia, ed., trans. George H. Taylor. New York: Columbia University Press, 1985.
  • From Text to Action: Essays in Hermeneutics II, trans. Kathleen Blamey and John B. Thompson. Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1991 (1986).
  • À l'école de la philosophie. Paris: J. Vrin, 1986.
  • Le mal: Un défi à la philosophie et à la théologie. Geneva: Labor et Fides, 1986.
  • Oneself as Another (Soi-même comme un autre), trans. Kathleen Blamey. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992 (1990).
  • A Ricœur Reader: Reflection and Imagination, ed. Mario J. Valdes. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1991.
  • Lectures I: Autour du politique. Paris: Seuil, 1991.
  • Lectures II: La Contrée des philosophes. Paris: Seuil, 1992.
  • Lectures III: Aux frontières de la philosophie. Paris: Seuil, 1994.
  • The Philosophy of Paul Ricœur, ed. Lewis E. Hahn (The Library of Living Philosophers 22) (Chicago; La Salle: Open Court, 1995)
  • The Just, trans. David Pellauer. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000 (1995).
  • Critique and Conviction, trans. Kathleen Blamey. New York: Columbia University Press, 1998 (1995).
  • La mémoire, l'histoire, l'oubli. Paris: Seuil, 2000.
  • Le Juste II. Paris: Esprit, 2001.

Hagagali 10:06, 27 May 2007 (UTC)==Further reading==

  • Pamela Sue Anderson, 1993. Ricœur and Kant: philosophy of the will. Atlanta: Scholars Press.
  • Bernard P. Dauenhauer, 1998. Paul Ricœur: The Promise and Risk of Politics. Boulder: Rowman and Littlefield.
  • François Dosse, 1997. Paul Ricœur: Les Sens d'une Vie. Paris: La Découverte.
  • Don Idhe, 1971. Hermeneutic Phenomenology: The Philosophy of Paul Ricœur. Northwestern University Press.
  • David M. Kaplan, 2003. Ricœur's Critical Theory. SUNY Press.
  • Richard Kearney, 2004. On Paul Ricœur: The Owl of Minerva. Hants, England: Ashgate Publishing.
  • Gregory J. Laughery, 2002. Living Hermeneutics in Motion: An Analysis and Evaluation of Paul Ricoeur's Contribution to Biblical Hermeneutics. Lanham: University Press of America.
  • Charles E. Reagan, 1996. Paul Ricœur: His Life and Work. University of Chicago Press.
  • Karl Simms, 2002. Paul Ricœur, Routledge Critical Thinkers. Routledge Press.
  • Haggag Ali. Paul Ricoeur and the Challenge of Semiology. unpublished MA thesis. Cairo University, Facutly of Arts, Department of English, 2004.

Pamela Sue Anderson is Official Fellow, Tutor in Philosophy and Christian Ethics, Dean, and Womens Advisor of Regents Park College in the University of Oxford. ... Richard Kearney is Charles Seeling professor of philosophy at Boston College and has taught at University College Dublin. ... Dr. Gregory J. Laughery is an American /Swiss theologian. ...

See also

Continental philosophy is a term used in philosophy to designate one of two major traditions of modern Western philosophy. ... Postmodern Christianity is an understanding of Christianity that is closely associated with the body of writings known as postmodern philosophy. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Paul Ricoeur (1913-2005) [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy] (5334 words)
Ricoeur argues that the stability we enjoy with respect to the meanings of our lives is a tentative stability, subject to the influences of the material world, including the powers and afflictions of one's body, the actions of other people and institutions, and one's own emotional and cognitive states.
Ricoeur's account of the way in which narrative represents the human world of acting (and, in its passive mode, suffering) turns on three stages of interpretation that he calls mimesis1 (prefiguration of the field of action), mimesis2 (configuration of the field of action), and mimesis3 (refiguration of the field of action).
Ricoeur argues that the temporal order of the events depicted in the narrative is simultaneous with the construction of the necessity that connects those elements into a conceptual unity: from the structure of one thing after another arises the conceptual relation of one thing because of another.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m