FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Paul Levinson
Paul Levinson
Born: 1947
Occupation(s): Novelist, Professor, Writer
Paul Levinson, 2002
Enlarge
Paul Levinson, 2002

Paul Levinson (b. 1947) is a writer and professor at Fordham University in New York City. Levinson writes both fiction and non-fiction. His work has been translated into Chinese, Japanese, Korean, French, Italian, Portuguese, Czech, Polish, Romanian, Macedonian, Croatian, and Turkish. He has been interviewed on myriad television and radio shows, including the O'Reilly Factor, Jesse Ventura's America, the CBS Evening News, and Nightline about media issues, and his literature. He has also served as President of the SFWA (Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America). He writes both science fiction and fantasy with philosophical undertones. Levinson has received many awards and honors for his work, including nominations for the Hugo Award and the Nebula Award. 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... A professor giving a lecture The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... The term writer can apply to anyone who creates a written work, but the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... The term writer can apply to anyone who creates a written work, but the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... A professor giving a lecture The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... Fordham University is a co-educational private university in New York City. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Big Apple Location Location in the state of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,214. ... The Three Graces, here in a painting by Sandro Botticelli, were the goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity and fertility in Greek mythology. ... Non-fiction is an account or representation of a subject which is presented as fact. ... The OReilly Factor is a show on FOX News hosted by Bill OReilly that discusses political and social issues of the day, with both conservative and liberal guests. ... Jesse The Body Ventura (born July 15, 1951, as James George Janos) was elected the 38th Governor of Minnesota on November 3, 1998, after a career as Navy SEAL, professional wrestler, actor, mayor, and radio talk show host. ... CBS Evening News is the flagship nightly television news program of the American television network CBS. The network has broadcast this program since 1948, and has used the CBS Evening News title since 1963. ... Nightline is a late-night hard news program broadcast by ABC in the United States, and has a franchised formula to other networks and stations elsewhere in the world. ... Science Fiction Writers of America, or SFWA (pronounced siff-wah or seff-wah), was founded in 1965 by Damon Knight. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... haha For other meanings see Fantasy (disambiguation) Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... Philosopher in Meditation (detail), by Rembrandt. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years. ...


He is a science fiction fan himself, particularly enjoying Isaac Asimov's famous trilogy, Foundation, which examines the predictability of mankind and tests the bounds of determinism and controlled consciousness. Paul Levinson is also an admirer of On Liberty by John Stuart Mill, a groundbreaking essay on Utilitarianism. Among Levinson's major 20th-century philosophic influences: Marshall McLuhan, Karl Popper, Carl Sagan, Donald T. Campbell. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Isaac Asimov, Ph. ... Psychohistorian: Hari Seldon Foundation is the first book in Isaac Asimovs Foundation Trilogy (later expanded into The Foundation Series). ... Determinism is the philosophical proposition that every event, including human cognition and action, is causally determined by an unbroken chain of prior occurrences. ... Consciousness is a quality of the mind generally regarded to comprise qualities such as subjectivity, self-awareness, sentience, sapience, and the ability to perceive the relationship between oneself and ones environment. ... On Liberty is a philosophical work in the English language by 19th century philosopher John Stuart Mill, first published in 1859. ... John Stuart Mill (May 20, 1806 – May 8, 1873), an English philosopher and political economist, was an influential liberal and socialist thinker of the 19th century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Marshall McLuhan Herbert Marshall McLuhan CC (July 21, 1911 – December 31, 1980) was a Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar, professor of English literature, literary critic, and communications theorist, who is one of the founders of the study of media ecology and is today an honorary guru among technophiles. ... Sir Karl Raimund Popper, CH, MA, Ph. ... Dr. Carl Edward Sagan (November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) was an American astronomer, astrobiologist, and highly successful science popularizer. ... Donald T. Campbell (November 20, 1916 - May 5, 1996) was an American social scientist. ...

Contents


Publications

Levinson's most recent novel is The Plot To Save Socrates (February 2006) February 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → 1 February 2006 (Wednesday) Governor of West Virginia Joe Manchin asks for a halt in coal mining following two more coal mining deaths in the state that saw fourteen people die in coal mining disasters in...


Additional publications

Mind at Large: Knowing in the Technological Age (1988)
Electronic Chronicles: Columns of the Changes in our Time (1992)
The Soft Edge: A Natural History and Future of the Information Revolution (1997)
Digital McLuhan: A Guide to the Information Millennium (1999)
The Silk Code (1999)
Borrowed Tides (2001)
The Consciousness Plague (2002)
Realspace: The Fate of Physical Presence in the Digital Age, On and Off Planet (2003)
The Pixel Eye (2003)
Cellphone: The Story of the World's Most Mobile Medium and How It Has Transformed Everything! (2004)

Articles and Columns


Songwriter and recording artist

Twice Upon a Rhyme


External links

The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Paul Levinson (113 words)
Paul Levinson is the author of three science fiction novels and numerous shorter works; he has also written extensively about media and the Digital Age, being a disciple of the still-controversial thinker, the late Marshall McLuhan.
Levinson's most famous creation, Dr. Phil D'Amato (featured in the novels The Silk Code and The Consciousness Plague), is a no-nonsense NYPD forensic scientist whose adventures rival anything in The X-Files.
Levinson's first D'Amato story, "The Chronology Protection Case", was recently adapted as a 45-minute short film directed by Jay Kensinger.
Strate_ipctv6n1-2.html (1545 words)
Levinson's point of view, that technological development can be read as a "natural history" much the same as biological development, immediately sets his brand of technoptimism off from the fairly facile arguments of Nicholas Negroponte, George Gilder, and Marvin Minsky.
Levinson's theory of media evolution is identified as anthropotropic: As media evolve they move from a state of greater artificiality to one of greater naturalness, that is, a state that more closely approximates nonmediated experience.
Individuals who agree with Levinson's outlook should read his book to deepen their understanding of the advantages of the new media, to better understand how the new media came to be, and to get a handle on where they might be going in the future.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m