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Encyclopedia > Paul Keating
The Honourable
 Paul Keating
 LLD (hc, KU) LLD (hc, US) LLD (hc, UNSW)


24th Prime Minister of Australia
Elections: 1993, 1996
In office
20 December 1991 – 11 March 1996
Deputy Brian Howe
Kim Beazley
Preceded by Bob Hawke
Succeeded by John Howard
Constituency Blaxland (New South Wales)

In office
11 March 1983 – 20 December 1991
Preceded by John Howard
Succeeded by Bob Hawke

In office
25 October 1969 – 15 June 1996
Preceded by James Harrison
Succeeded by Michael Hatton

Born 18 January 1944 (1944-01-18) (age 64)
Sydney, NSW, Australia
Political party Australian Labor Party
Occupation Trade union staffer

Paul John Keating (born 18 January 1944) was the 24th Prime Minister of Australia, from 1991 to 1996. He came to prominence as the reformist Treasurer in the Hawke government from 1983. As Prime Minister, he is noted for his many legislative achievements, and his victory in the 1993 federal election, which many had considered "unwinnable" for Labor. In his second term, however, his "big picture" policies failed to impress an electorate that was increasingly concerned about economic issues. Keating was defeated at the 1996 federal election by the conservative Coalition of the Liberal and National Parties, led by John Howard. Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Image File history File links Acap. ... Paul Keating is the name of: Paul Keating (born 1944), 24th Prime Minister of Australia Paul Keating (born 1976), British actor Category: ... The prefix The Honourable or The Honorable ( or formerly The Honble) is a title of quality attached to the names of certain classes of persons. ... Doctor of Laws (Latin: Legum Doctor, LL.D) is a doctorate-level academic degree in law. ... An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ... Keio University ) is one of the oldest private universities in Japan. ... Doctor of Laws (Latin: Legum Doctor, LL.D) is a doctorate-level academic degree in law. ... An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ... Malay name Malay: Universiti Nasional Singapura Tamil name Tamil: சிங்கப்பூர் தேசிய பல்கலைக்கழகம் University Cultural Centre The National University of Singapore (Abbreviation: NUS) is Singapores oldest university. ... Doctor of Laws (Latin: Legum Doctor, LL.D) is a doctorate-level academic degree in law. ... An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ... The University of New South Wales, also known as UNSW or colloquially as New South, is a university situated in Kensington, a suburb in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Prime Minister of Australia is the head of government of the Commonwealth of Australia, holding office on commission from the Governor-General. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on 13 March 1993. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on 2 March 1996. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Brian Leslie Howe, AM (born 23 January 1936), Australian politician, was Deputy Prime Minister in the Labor government of Paul Keating from 1991 to 1995. ... For Kim Beazleys father, Kim Beazley senior, see Kim Edward Beazley. ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ... Blaxland is an Australian Electoral Division in New South Wales. ... NSW redirects here. ... The Department of the Treasury, Canberra The Australian Treasurer is the minister responsible for government expenditure and revenue raising. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... Parliament House, Canberra The Parliament of Australia is a bicameral parliament consisting of the Queen of Australia, the House of Representatives (the lower house) and the Senate (the upper house or house of review). Section 1 of the Constitution of Australia provides that: The legislative power of the Commonwealth shall... Blaxland is an Australian Electoral Division in New South Wales. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Michael Hatton Michael John Hatton (born 28 August 1951), Australian politician, has been an Australian Labor Party member of the Australian House of Representatives since June 1996, representing the Division of Blaxland, New South Wales. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... NSW redirects here. ... ALP redirects here. ... The Lawrence textile strike (1912), with soldiers surrounding peaceful demonstrators A trade union or labor union is an organization of workers who have banded together to achieve common goals in key areas of wages, hours, and working conditions. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Prime Minister of Australia is the head of government of the Commonwealth of Australia, holding office on commission from the Governor-General. ... The Department of the Treasury, Canberra The Australian Treasurer is the minister responsible for government expenditure and revenue raising. ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on 5 March 1983. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on 13 March 1993. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on 2 March 1996. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ...

Contents

Early life

Paul Keating in 1977

Keating grew up in Bankstown, a working-class suburb of Sydney. He was one of four children of Matthew Keating, a boilermaker and trade union representative of Irish-Catholic descent, and his wife, Minnie. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bankstown Rail Bridge 1946. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Irish Catholics are persons of predominantly Irish descent who adhere to the Roman Catholic faith. ...


Keating was educated at Catholic schools; he was the first practising Catholic Labor Prime Minister since James Scullin left office in 1932. Leaving De La Salle College Bankstown (now LaSalle Catholic College) at 15, Keating worked as a clerk and then as a research assistant for a trade union. He joined the Labor Party as soon as he was eligible. In 1966, he became President of the ALP’s Youth Council.[1] James Henry Scullin (September 18, 1876 – January 28, 1953), Australian Labor politician and ninth Prime Minister of Australia. ... LaSalle Catholic College is a secondary college located in Bankstown, New South Wales, Australia. ...


Through the unions and the NSW Young Labor Council, Keating met other Labor luminaries such as Laurie Brereton, Graham Richardson and Bob Carr, and developed a friendship with former New South Wales Labor Premier Jack Lang, then in his 90s. Keating met Lang to discuss politics on a weekly basis for some time, and in 1971 succeeded in having Lang re-admitted to the Labor party.[2] Using his extensive contacts, Keating gained Labor endorsement for the federal seat of Blaxland in the western suburbs of Sydney, and was elected to the House of Representatives at the 1969 election, at the age of 25.[1] Hon Laurie Brereton Laurence John Laurie Brereton (born 29 May 1946), Australian politician, was an Australian Labor Party member of the Australian House of Representatives from March 1990 to October 2004, representing the Division of Kingsford Smith, New South Wales. ... Graham Richardson (born September 27, 1949, in Sydney, Australia) is a former Labor politician who was a numbers man for the right wing of the New South Wales branch of the Australian Labor Party. ... For other people of the same name, see Bob Carr (disambiguation). ... NSW redirects here. ... John Thomas Lang (December 21, 1876 - September 27, 1975) was a prominent Australian politician during the early twentieth century. ... Blaxland is an Australian Electoral Division in New South Wales. ...


Keating was a backbencher for most of the tenure of the Whitlam Labor government (December 1972 – November 1975), and briefly became Minister for Northern Australia in October 1975, one of the youngest ministers in Australian history. After Labor's defeat in 1975, Keating became an opposition frontbencher, and in 1981 he became president of the New South Wales branch of the party, and thus leader of the dominant right-wing faction. As opposition spokesperson on energy, his parliamentary style was that of an aggressive debater. He initially supported Bill Hayden against Bob Hawke's leadership challenges, partly because he hoped to succeed Hayden himself; but by the end of 1982, he accepted that Hawke would become leader. Edward Gough Whitlam, AC, QC (born 11 July 1916), known as Gough Whitlam (, pronounced Goff), is an Australian former politician and 21st Prime Minister of Australia. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... William George Hayden AC (born 23 January 1933), Australian politician and 21st Governor-General of Australia, was born in Brisbane, Queensland, the son of an American-born sailor of Irish descent. ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ...


In 1975, Keating married Annita van Iersel, a Dutch flight attendant for Alitalia. The Keatings had four children, who spent some of their teenage years in the Lodge, the Prime Minister's official residence in Canberra. They separated in late November 1998. Keating's daughter, Katherine, was a former adviser to former New South Wales Minister Craig Knowles. [3] Annita Keating (b. ... Airbus A321-100 lands at London Heathrow airport Alitalia - Linee Aeree Italiane (Italian for Alitalia - Italian Air Lines) (BIT: AZA10) is the flag carrier airline of Italy. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ... Craig Knowles is an Australian politician. ...


Keating's interests include collecting French antique clocks, and the music of Mahler.[1] Keating is a resident of Potts Point, Sydney. For other uses, see Antique (disambiguation). ... Mahler refers to: Alma Maria Mahler-Werfel, or Alma Maria Schindler-Mahler Anna Mahler Arthur Mahler, Austrian archeologist Bruce Mahler, actor David Mahler, composer Eduard Mahler, Austrian astronomer; born in Hungary Gustav Mahler, Bohemian-Austrian composer and conductor Halfdan T. Mahler, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO) from... Potts Point is a small, densely-populated suburb of inner-city Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ...


Reforming treasurer

When Hawke won the March 1983 election, Keating became Treasurer, a post he held until 1991. Keating succeeded John Howard in the position, and with it an economy that needed much attention; during Howard's tenure as treasurer, interest rates peaked at 22% on 8 April 1982 [4] and inflation peaked at 12.5% in September 1982. [5] Federal elections were held in Australia on 5 March 1983. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...


The Hawke–Keating government was able to lower the inherited high interest rates and inflation and to keep inflation mostly under control, except for some periods of high inflation. Inflation under Hawke and Keating did not exceed 10 per cent.

Keating is often criticised for letting interest rates get too high—as Treasurer and Prime Minister, Keating presided over several periods of very high interest rates. Keating attacked Howard for allegedly lying to Parliament about the size of the budget deficit that had been left by the outgoing government. (see: RBA: Bulletin Statistical Tables for interest rate data and RBA: Measures of Consumer Price Inflation for inflation data) Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... For the daughter of President George W. Bush, see Barbara Pierce Bush. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... The Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia is the representative of Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia. ... William George Hayden AC (born 23 January 1933), Australian politician and 21st Governor-General of Australia, was born in Brisbane, Queensland, the son of an American-born sailor of Irish descent. ... The Prime Minister of Australia is the head of government of the Commonwealth of Australia, holding office on commission from the Governor-General. ... Annita Keating (b. ... Government House from the lookout on Lady Denman Drive Government House, Canberra, commonly known as Yarralumla, is the official residence of the Governor-General of Australia, located in the suburb of Yarralumla, Canberra. ...


After a difficult start, Keating mastered economic policy and was soon acknowledged as the driving political force behind the economic reforms of the Hawke government.[citation needed] Under the Hawke/Keating governments from 1983 to 1996, Labor pursued many economic policies associated with economic rationalism and the "Third Way", such as floating the Australian Dollar in 1983, reductions in trade tariffs, taxation reforms, changing from centralised wage-fixing to enterprise bargaining, the privatisation of Qantas and Commonwealth Bank, and deregulating the banking system. In 1985, Keating proposed the introduction of a value-added tax (known in Australia, New Zealand and Canada whence it was directly copied as the Goods and Services Tax or GST), an option seriously debated before being dropped by Hawke, after it became clear how unpopular the tax would be in the electorate.[citation needed] Economic rationalism is an Australian term in discussion of microeconomic policy, applicable to the economic policy of many governments around the world, in particular during the 1980s and 1990s. ... Bill Clinton and Tony Blair, adherents of the Third Way The Third Way, or Radical center, is a centrist political philosophy of governance that embraces a mix of market and interventionist philosophies. ... A floating currency is a currency that uses a floating exchange rate as its exchange rate regime. ... ISO 4217 Code AUD User(s) Australia, Kiribati, Nauru, Tuvalu, Christmas Island, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, and Norfolk Island Inflation 1. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        For other uses of this word, see tariff (disambiguation). ... An Enterprise Bargaining Agreement (EBA) is the name for a statutory agreement made under the Workplace Relations Act, and then properly registered with the Australian Industrial Relations Commission, that is made between an employer and a group of workers who work for that employer with two additional optional parties being... Qantas Airways Limited (IPA: ) is the national airline of Australia. ... The Commonwealth Bank of Australia (ASX: CBA) is one of the largest financial institutions in Australia, founded in 1911 by the Australian Government. ... Value added tax (VAT) is a sales tax levied on the sale of goods and services. ... The GST (Goods and Services Tax) is a value added tax of 10% on most goods and services sold in Australia. ...


The Hawke–Keating partnership was strongest during the first two terms of the government (1983–87), with Hawke playing the statesman and populist leader with Keating the political attack dog.[citation needed] His range of parliamentary invective was legendary, and Liberal Opposition leaders Andrew Peacock and John Howard were unable to get the better of him. Keating and Hawke provided a study in contrasts. Hawke was a Rhodes Scholar; Keating left high school early. Hawke's enthusiasms were cigars, horse racing, women and all forms of sport; Keating preferred classical architecture, classical music and collecting antique clocks. Hawke was consensus-driven; Keating revelled in aggressive debate. Hawke was a lapsed Protestant; Keating was a practising Roman Catholic. Despite, or because of, their differences, the two formed an effective political partnership. After the 1987 election, however, Keating began to feel that it was time for Hawke to make way for him. However, the beginnings of a recession (of which in 1990, Keating famously said "This is the recession Australia had to have")[6] saw a resurgence in support for the Liberal party, which Keating used in his push for leadership. This article is about the modern Australian political party. ... Andrew Sharp Peacock AC (born 13 February 1939), Australian Liberal politician, was born in Melbourne, Victoria, the son of a wealthy company director. ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... From the point of view of modern times, the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean sometimes seem to blend smoothly into one melange we call the Classical. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... In macroeconomics, a Recession is a decline in any countrys Gross Domestic Product (GDP), or negative real economic growth, for two or more successive quarters of a year. ...


Leadership rivalry

In 1988, in a meeting at Kirribilli House, Hawke and Keating discussed the handover of the leadership to Keating. Hawke confidentially agreed in front of two witnesses that after the 1990 election, he would resign in Keating's favour. In June 1991, after Hawke had intimated to Keating that he planned to renege on the deal on the basis that Keating had been publicly disloyal and moreover was less popular than Hawke, Keating challenged him for the leadership. He lost, resigned as Treasurer, and publicly declared his leadership ambitions had ended (a declaration which few believed). The eastern side of Kirribilli House, as seen from a commuter ferry. ...


Throughout the rest of 1991, the position of the Hawke government deteriorated under pressure from the recent recession, sniping from Keating supporters and attacks from the Opposition. In December 1991, Keating defeated Hawke in a second leadership challenge, and became Prime Minister.


Prime Minister 1991–96

Paul Keating at the APEC forum in Bogor, Indonesia in November 1994 with heads of government (from left to right) Jim Bolger (NZ), unknown, Julius Chan (PNG), Keating, Mahathir Mohamad (Malaysia), Jiang Zemin (PRC) and Eduardo Frei Ruiz-Tagle (Chile). Paul Keating's batik shirt features Australia's Coat of Arms in its intricate pattern.

Hawke's undoing had been the policy package unveiled by the new Liberal leader, Dr John Hewson. Known as Fightback!, it was centred around a GST and included massive industrial relations reforms, sweeping cuts to personal income tax and cuts to government spending, particularly in areas of health and education. Hawke and his new Treasurer, John Kerin, had been unable to counter the renewed energy of the opposition, which was invigorated by a policy package it perceived as a vote winner. Keating, however, severely damaged Hewson's credibility in a series of set-piece parliamentary encounters. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... APEC redirects here. ... Nickname: Kota Hujan (City of Rain) Location of Bogor in Indonesia Coordinates: Government  - Mayor Diani Budiarto Time zone WIB (UTC+7) Area code(s) 0251 Website: www. ... The Right Honourable James Brendan Jim Bolger, ONZ, (born 31 May 1935) was Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1990 to 1997. ... Sir Julius Chan GCL, GCMG, KBE (陳仲民 Pinyin: Chén Zhòngmín) (born 29 August 1939) was Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea in 1980–1982 and 1994–1997. ... Mahathir bin Mohamad (born December 20, 1925 in Alor Star, Kedah) was the Prime Minister of Malaysia from July 16, 1981 to 2003. ... Jiāng Zémín (Traditional Chinese: 江澤民, Simplified Chinese: 江泽民, Hanyu Pinyin: Jiāng Zémín, Wade-Giles: Chiang Tse-min, Cantonese (Jyutping): gong1 zaak6 man4) (born August 17, 1926) was the core of the third generation of Communist Party of China leaders, serving as General Secretary of the Communist... Eduardo Frei Ruiz-Tagle (born June 24, 1942) was President of Chile from 1994 to 2000. ... This article is about the textile dyeing technique. ... Australian Coat of Arms (since 1912) The Coat of Arms of Australia is the official symbol of Australia. ... For the English soldier and regicide, see John Hewson (regicide). ... Fightback! was a radical economic policy package proposed by John Hewson, then leader of Australias Liberal Party, in November 1991. ... John Kerin is an Australian economist and politician. ...


Nevertheless, the view of most commentators was that the 1993 election was "unwinnable" for Labor. The government had been in power for 10 years, the pace of economic recovery was sluggish, and some voters perceived Keating as arrogant. However, Keating succeeded in winning back the electorate with a strong campaign opposing Fightback, memorable for Keating's reference to Hewson's proposed GST as "15% on this, 15% on that", and a focus on creating jobs to reduce unemployment. Keating led Labor to an unexpected election victory, and his memorable "true believers" victory speech has entered Australian political folklore as one of the great Australian political speeches. [7] After Keating, some of the reforms of Fightback were implemented under the centre-right coalition government of John Howard.[citation needed] Federal elections were held in Australia on 13 March 1993. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ...


As Prime Minister, Keating's interests and public perception broadened from that of the narrowly focused Treasurer. His agenda included items such as making Australia a republic, achieving reconciliation with Australia's indigenous population, and further economic and cultural engagement with Asia. These issues, which came to be known as Keating's "big picture,"[8] were highly popular with the tertiary-educated middle class, but failed to capture the aspirations of rural and outer-suburban voters.[citation needed] Australian Aborigines are the main indigenous people of Australia. ...


As well as this agenda, Keating embarked on a comprehensive legislative program. He established the Australian National Training Authority (ANTA), reviewed the Sex Discrimination Act, and legislated for the native title rights of Australia's indigenous people following the historic High Court decision in Mabo. He developed bilateral links with Australia's neighbours, primarily Australia’s largest neighbour Indonesia. Keating also took an active role in the establishment of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Forum (APEC), and initiated the yearly leaders' meeting. One of Keating's far-reaching legislative achievements was the introduction of a national superannuation scheme, implemented to address low national savings. Eddie Mabo & Ors v The State of Queensland (No. ... APEC redirects here. ...


Concerning East Timor, Paul Keating received some criticism from Human Rights groups and Nobel Peace Prize winner José Ramos-Horta over his friendship with President Suharto, and the Keating government's policy of aiding the Indonesian military in their occupation of East Timor. East Timor had gained a higher profile in Australia and Internationally after the Dili massacre. Keating was criticised for his close ties with Suharto and the signing of the Timor Gap Treaty over human rights concerns. [9][10][11][12] Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... José Manuel Ramos Horta (born December 26, 1949) has been Foreign Minister of East Timor since independence in 2002, having previously been a spokesman for the East Timorese resistance in exile during the years of Indonesian occupation between 1975 and 1999. ... Suharto GCB (born June 8, 1921) is a former Indonesian military and political leader. ... The Dili Massacre was the shooting of East Timorese protesters, in the Santa Cruz cemetery in the capital, Dili, on 12th November, 1991. ... Suharto GCB (born June 8, 1921) is a former Indonesian military and political leader. ... The Timor Gap Treaty is a treaty between the governments of Australia and Indonesia signed in 1989. ...


Defeat

The Liberal Party leadership issues continued to assist Keating in his time as Prime Minister. After Hewson's 1993 defeat, Alexander Downer replaced him as Liberal party leader in 1994. Downer's downfall came after a policy speech in which, joking that his party's new slogan "the things that matter" could cover any policy area, he referred to domestic violence policy as "the things that batter". This, coupled with Keating's parliamentary jibes such as being the "idiot son of the establishment"[13] saw his downfall in early 1995 when John Howard gained the Liberal leadership for the second time. The Coalition soon jumped to a huge lead in opinion polling. More ominously, Howard swiftly overtook Keating as preferred Prime Minister. A further warning sign for Labor was the loss of a by-election in the seat of Canberra in 1995. It soon became obvious that Keating would not be reelected. Alexander John Gosse Downer, MP (born 9 September 1951), Australian politician, became Foreign Minister of Australia in March 1996 This makes him the longest serving Foreign Minister in Australian history. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... The Division of Canberra is an Australian Electoral Division in the Australian Capital Territory. ...


With the economy in recovery but still somewhat lacking after the late 80s/early 90s recession, Howard, determined to avoid a repeat of the 1993 election, deliberately ensured that the focus never left the Government by recanting his previous views on Asian immigration, promising that the GST would "never ever" be introduced, guaranteeing that "no worker would be worse off" under his Industrial Relations reforms and pledging to keep Medicare. Howard also adopted a "small target" strategy in order to secure support from small business and other sections of the community. The recession of the late nineteen-eighties was an economic recession that hit much of the world beginning in 1987. ... The GST (Goods and Services Tax) is a value added tax of 10% on most goods and services sold in Australia. ... A Boeing employee speaks at a trade union rally The field of industrial relations looks at the relationship between management and workers, particularly groups of workers represented by a union. ... Medicare is Australias publicly-funded universal health care system, operated by the government authority Medicare Australia. ...


By the time the writs were issued for the 1996 election, it had been clear for some time that the Coalition would be returned to power after a record 13 years of Labor government. In the election held that March, Keating was swept from power in a massive Coalition landslide. Howard and the Coalition scored a 26-seat swing--the second-worst defeat of a sitting government since Federation. Keating immediately resigned as Labor Party leader, and resigned from Parliament a little over a month later, on April 23, 1996. Federal elections were held in Australia on 2 March 1996. ...


Life after politics

Since its publication in March 2002, Don Watson's Recollections of a Bleeding Heart has sold over 50,000 copies and won a string of prestigious awards, including The Age Book of the Year and Best Non-fiction book, The Courier-Mail Book of the Year and the National Biography Award.
Since its publication in March 2002, Don Watson's Recollections of a Bleeding Heart has sold over 50,000 copies and won a string of prestigious awards, including The Age Book of the Year and Best Non-fiction book, The Courier-Mail Book of the Year and the National Biography Award.

In retirement Keating has been a director of various companies.[14] During Howard's Prime Ministership, Keating has made occasional speeches strongly criticising his successor's social policies, and defending his own policies (such as those on East Timor). A portrait of Keating was commissioned and now hangs in Parliament House, Canberra.[15] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 389 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (480 × 740 pixel, file size: 67 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned either by the artist who created the cover or... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 389 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (480 × 740 pixel, file size: 67 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned either by the artist who created the cover or... Don Watson (born 1949) is an author and public intellectual, who was speechwriter to former Australian Prime Minister Paul Keating. ... The Age Book of the Year Awards are annual literary awards presented by Melbournes The Age newspaper. ... The Courier-Mail is a daily newspaper published in Brisbane, Australia. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Representatives Senate Speaker of the House of Representatives David Hawker, Liberal Party since 16 November 2004 President of the Senate Alan Ferguson, Liberal Party since 14 August 2007 Members 226 (150 Representatives, 76 Senators) Political groups Liberal Party ALP National Party Country Liberal Party Greens... For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ...


In 2000, he published a book, Engagement: Australia Faces the Asia-Pacific, which focused on foreign policy during his term as Prime Minister.[16]


He is currently a Visiting Professor of Public Policy at the University of New South Wales. He has been awarded honorary Doctorates in Laws from Keio University in Tokyo, the National University of Singapore, and the University of New South Wales. The University of New South Wales, also known as UNSW or colloquially as New South, is a university situated in Kensington, a suburb in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Keio University ) is one of the oldest private universities in Japan. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Malay name Malay: Universiti Nasional Singapura Tamil name Tamil: சிங்கப்பூர் தேசிய பல்கலைக்கழகம் University Cultural Centre The National University of Singapore (Abbreviation: NUS) is Singapores oldest university. ... The University of New South Wales, also known as UNSW or colloquially as New South, is a university situated in Kensington, a suburb in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ...


Keating is currently the Chairman (international) of Carnegie, Wylie & Company - a Sydney based investment bank.[17]


In February, 2008, Keating joined former Prime Ministers Whitlam, Fraser and Hawke in Parliament House, Canberra, to witness the parliamentary apology to the Stolen Generations.[18] Edward Gough Whitlam, AC, QC (born 11 July 1916), known as Gough Whitlam (, pronounced Goff), is an Australian former politician and 21st Prime Minister of Australia. ... This article is about the former prime minister of Australia; for the Western Australian public servant, see Malcolm Fraser (surveyor). ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... Parliament House Canberra: The main entrance and the flag mast. ... The Stolen Generation is a term used to describe the Australian Aboriginal children, usually of mixed descent, who were removed from their families by Australian government agencies and church missions, under various state acts of parliament, denying the rights of parents and making all Aboriginal cildren wards of the state...


Views on John Howard

Keating lambasted his successor John Howard, once describing him as a "desiccated coconut" who was "araldited to the front bench", as well as stating "Howard ... is an old antediluvian 19th century person who wanted to stomp forever ... on ordinary people's rights to organise themselves at work ... he's a pre-Copernican obscurantist".[19] He also claimed that Howard's deputy, Federal Treasurer Peter Costello, was "all tip and no iceberg" when referring to a pact made by Howard to hand the premiership to Costello after two terms.[20] His criticisms of the Howard Government have included accusing Howard of dishonesty when taking the country to the Iraq War [20]. John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ... Araldite is a registered trademark of Huntsman Advanced Materials (previously part of Ciba) referring to their range of engineering and structural epoxy, acrylic, and polyurethane adhesives. ... According to the Bible, the only survivors from the antediluvian period were Noah and his family. ... This article is about the historical term. ... Obscurantism in its current usage can imply one of two separate concepts, sometimes distinguished by capitalization: // The older sense of the term Obscurantism refers to a class of philosophies that favor limits on the extension and dissemination of scientific knowledge, believing it to be the enemy of faith. ... The Department of the Treasury, Canberra The Australian Treasurer is the minister responsible for government expenditure and revenue raising. ... Peter Howard Costello (born 14 August 1957) is an Australian politician. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ...


In July 2007, Keating again criticised Howard calling him "a nationalist and not a patriot", using Adolf Hitler as an example, but at the same time stating his use of Hitler only in the narrative, and that aligning Hitler with Howard (or Thatcher) would be unreasonable and absurd.[21] Keating added "Shades there of John Howard's discomfort with Australia's multicultural community and a disgust of the Islamic community." Federal Minister Joe Hockey responded by saying "Paul Keating is an unguided missile and obviously there are some people in this life that suffer attention deficit disorder when they leave politics - he's one of them". [22] Howard replied to the remarks with "I'm a nationalist, I'm a patriot, I'm a believer and I feel sorry for Mr Keating, he ought to get on with life".[21] Eugène Delacroixs Liberty Leading the People, symbolising French nationalism during the July Revolution 1830. ... Defence of the fatherland is a commonplace of patriotism: The statue in the courtyard of École polytechnique, Paris, commemorating the students involvement in defending France against the 1814 invasion of the Coalition. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Joseph Benedict Joe Hockey (born 2 August 1965), Australian politician, is the Federal Minister for Employment and Workplace Relations. ... DISCLAIMER Please remember that Wikipedia is offered for informational use only. ...


On Labor's victory at the Australian Federal Election, 2007, Keating said that he was relieved, rather than happy, that the Howard Government had been removed. He claimed that there was "[r]elief that the nation had put itself back on course. Relief that the toxicity of the Liberal social agenda – the active disparagement of particular classes and groups, that feeling of alienation in your own country – was over."[23] The 2007 election for the federal Parliament of Australia, in which 13. ...


He went on to say he did not feel sorry for Mr Howard when he conceded defeat and that "Howard is a fighter, he was fighting always about the wrong matters."


Views on the economy

Keating has often criticised Howard for taking credit over the relatively good economic conditions Australia has experienced over the latter half of Howard's time as Prime Minister. He reiterated this view in an interview on ABC Television's Lateline in June 2007 and also criticised the Howard Government on interest rates, WorkChoices and suggested that a Labor Federal Government should legislate for national minimum wages and conditions.[24] Keating had also often re-stated his disapproval that Labor since 1996 had not pursued the Liberal government on the economy. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ... Lateline (news) is a current affairs television program in Australia. ... An interest rate is the rental price of money. ... WorkChoices, or the Workplace Relations Act 1996 as amended by the Workplace Relations Amendment (Workchoices) Act 2005, came into effect in March 2006. ...

Bust of Paul Keating by political cartoonist, caricaturist and sculptor Peter Nicholson located in the Prime Minister's Avenue in the Ballarat Botanical Gardens
Bust of Paul Keating by political cartoonist, caricaturist and sculptor Peter Nicholson located in the Prime Minister's Avenue in the Ballarat Botanical Gardens

Views on Sydney

Keating has also recently become involved in the debate over Sydney's development as a city. [25] In May 2007, he suggested that Sydney should be the capital of Australia, not Canberra saying that: This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ...

John Howard has already effectively moved the Parliament here. Cabinet meets in Philip Street in Sydney, and when they do go to Canberra, they fly down to the bush capital, and everybody flies out on Friday. There is an air of unreality about Canberra. If Parliament sat in Sydney, they would have a better understanding of the problems being faced by their constituents. These real things are camouflaged from Canberra.[26] Type Bicameral Houses House of Representatives Senate Speaker of the House of Representatives David Hawker, Liberal Party since 16 November 2004 President of the Senate Alan Ferguson, Liberal Party since 14 August 2007 Members 226 (150 Representatives, 76 Senators) Political groups Liberal Party ALP National Party Country Liberal Party Greens... Sydney Law School The Supreme Court Building Ben Chifley statue in Chifley Place Phillip Street is a street in the central business district of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ...

Premier of New South Wales, Morris Iemma, responded by saying "the administrative capital of Australia is Canberra, that's where Parliament is. It would be terrific if we could pull it off, but I can't see that happening." The Chief Minister of the Australian Capital Territory Jon Stanhope described Keating's idea as "puerile".[27] List of Premiers of New South Wales Before the 1890s there was no formal party system in New South Wales. ... Morris Iemma (pronounced Yemma), born 21 July 1961, is an Australian politician and the Premier of New South Wales. ... The Chief Minister for the Australian Capital Territory is the head of government of the Australian Capital Territory. ... For the 18th century British politician, see John Stanhope. ...


Views on Current ALP Leadership

Keating was critical of former Opposition Leader (now Prime Minister) Kevin Rudd's leadership team. For example, before the 2007 federal election, which Labor won, he criticised the then-Opposition industrial relations spokesperson, Julia Gillard, saying she lacked an understanding of principles such as enterprise bargaining set under his government in the late 1980s and early 1990s. He also attacked Rudd's chief of staff David Epstein and Gary Gray, who was at that time a candidate for the former Labor leader Kim Beazley's seat of Brand (he won the seat).[28] Kevin Michael Rudd (born 21 September 1957), is the leader of the federal Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition in the Australian Parliament. ... The 2007 election for the federal Parliament of Australia, in which 13. ... Julia Eileen Gillard (born 29 September 1961) is the Australian Deputy Prime Minister and deputy leader of the federal Australian Labor Party (ALP). ... Gary Gray AO (born 30 April 1958), Australian politician, is the Australian Labor Party representative for the Division of Brand in Western Australia in the Australian House of Representatives. ... For Kim Beazleys father, Kim Beazley senior, see Kim Edward Beazley. ... The Division of Brand is an Australian Electoral Division located south of Perth, Western Australia and including the towns of Mandurah and Rockingham. ...


See also

The First Keating Ministry was the fifty-ninth Australian Commonwealth ministry, and held office from 20 December 1991 to 24 March 1993. ... The Second Keating Ministry was the sixtieth Australian Commonwealth ministry, and held office from 24 March 1993 to 11 March 1996. ... The Redfern Park Speech was a famous speech made on December 10, 1992 by then Prime Minister of Australia Paul Keating at Redfern Park. ... Keating! is a musical theatre production portraying the political career of former Australian Prime Minister Paul Keating. ...

Further reading

  • Edna Carew, Paul Keating Prime Minister, Allen and Unwin, 1991
  • Paul Keating, Advancing Australia, Big Picture, 1995
  • Michael Gordon, A True Believer: Paul Keating, UQP, 1996
  • John Edwards, Keating: The Inside Story, Viking, 1996
  • Don Watson, Recollections of a Bleeding Heart: A Portrait of Paul Keating, Knopf, 2002

Don Watson (born 1949) is an author and public intellectual, who was speechwriter to former Australian Prime Minister Paul Keating. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Civics | Paul Keating (1944–)
  2. ^ Former PM Paul Keating and historian Frank Cain discuss Jack Lang's life, legacy and the Depression.
  3. ^ Keating's daughter called to testify - National - www.smh.com.au
  4. ^ Interest Rates and Yields - Money Market - Daily - F1 spreadsheet file. Reserve Bank of Australia (2006). Retrieved on 2006-11-05.
  5. ^ Measures of Consumer Price Inflation, Historical Data. Reserve Bank of Australia (2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-24.
  6. ^ Paul Keating - Chronology at australianpolitics.com
  7. ^ http://australianpolitics.com/sounds/1993/93-03-13_keating-claims-victory.ram
  8. ^ Fast Forward, Shaun Carney, The Age, 20-Nov-2007
  9. ^ The World Today - 5/10/99: Howard hits back at Keating over criticism
  10. ^ Australian Jewish Democratic Society - Rabin and East Timor
  11. ^ Microsoft Word - Alpheus Article Septembe#35.doc
  12. ^ ITV - John Pilger - A voice that shames those who are silent on Timor
  13. ^ Keating, Paul (1988-04-14). Hansard - Question without Notice: PUBLIC FINANCIAL ENTERPRISES: NET BORROWINGS (English). Hansard. Parliament of Australia. Retrieved on 2007-11-19. “There is the idiot son of the Establishment piping up again.”
  14. ^ For example ASX listing for Brain Resource Company Ltd. Company Information. Australian Stock Exchange. Retrieved on 2007-08-21.
  15. ^ Government of Australia, "Parliamentary Education Office: FAQ 4.10 Parliamentary Art Collection", 2007. Accessed 25 June 2007.
  16. ^ Books in Print
  17. ^ Lazard Carnegie Wylie. Carnegie, Wylie & Company. Retrieved on 2007-08-21.
  18. ^ Welch, Dylan. "Kevin Rudd says sorry", The Sydney Morning Herald, 2008-02-13. Retrieved on 2008-02-22. 
  19. ^ "Middle-of-the-road fascists can't compose IR policy", The Australian, May 2, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-07-14. 
  20. ^ a b The World Today - Keating criticises ALP over compulsory super plan. Australian Broadcasting Corporation (2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-14.
  21. ^ a b Former leader accuses Australian PM of nationalism; invokes Hitler / Quotes. DayLife (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-15.
  22. ^ Howard's not a patriot : Keating. Sydney Morning Herald (July 12 2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  23. ^ Paul Keating relieved John Howard era is over. Herald Sun (November 26 2007). Retrieved on 2007-01-12.
  24. ^ Paul Keating on the lead-up to the federal election. Lateline - ABC (07/06/2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-15.
  25. ^ Historic opportunity to recreate green Sydney - National - smh.com.au
  26. ^ Keating: Sydney should be the capital. Australian Broadcasting Corporation (May 25 2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  27. ^ Keating's capital idea for Sydney dismissed as 'puerile' debate fodder
  28. ^ Lateline, 7-Jun-2007, Also on Youtube: http://youtube.com/watch?v=SgUPvGN5mSo&feature=related http://youtube.com/watch?v=VsC6IZuP5F4&feature=related http://youtube.com/watch?v=61ElEVaEuOM&feature=related

The Reserve Bank of Australia came into being on 14 January 1960 to operate as Australias central bank and banknote issuing authority. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Reserve Bank of Australia came into being on 14 January 1960 to operate as Australias central bank and banknote issuing authority. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Representatives Senate Speaker of the House of Representatives David Hawker, Liberal Party since 16 November 2004 President of the Senate Alan Ferguson, Liberal Party since 14 August 2007 Members 226 (150 Representatives, 76 Senators) Political groups Liberal Party ALP National Party Country Liberal Party Greens... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Commonwealth of Australia is a constitutional monarchy, a federation, and a parliamentary democracy. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Australian is a national daily broadsheet newspaper published by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Lateline (news) is a current affairs television program in Australia. ... The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... YouTube is a popular video sharing website where users can upload, view and share video clips. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Paul Keating
Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Paul Keating
  • Keating's Personal Website
  • Meet a PM - National Archives of Australia
  • Paul Keating Insults Archive
  • Paul Keating at the National Film and Sound Archive
  • Video - Paul Keating vs John Hewson
  • Video - Re: The Great Motion
  • Video - Floating the dollar
Political offices
Preceded by
Rex Patterson
Minister for Northern Australia
1975
Succeeded by
Ian Sinclair
Preceded by
John Howard
Treasurer of Australia
1983 – 1991
Succeeded by
Bob Hawke
Preceded by
Lionel Bowen
Deputy Prime Minister of Australia
1990 – 1991
Succeeded by
Brian Howe
Preceded by
Bob Hawke
Prime Minister of Australia
1991 – 1996
Succeeded by
John Howard
Parliament of Australia
Preceded by
E.J. (Jim) Harrison
Member for Blaxland
1969 – 1996
Succeeded by
Michael Hatton
Party political offices
Preceded by
Lionel Bowen
Deputy Leader of the Australian Labor Party
1990 – 1991
Succeeded by
Brian Howe
Preceded by
Bob Hawke
Leader of the Australian Labor Party
1991 – 1996
Succeeded by
Kim Beazley
Persondata
NAME Keating, Paul John
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Prime Minister of Australia
DATE OF BIRTH 18 January 1944
PLACE OF BIRTH Sydney, Australia
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Rt Hon Ian Sinclair For the British writer, see Iain Sinclair. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ... The Department of the Treasury, Canberra The Australian Treasurer is the minister responsible for government expenditure and revenue raising. ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... Lionel Frost Bowen (born 28 December 1922), Australian politician, was a senior Labor figure, serving in the ministries of Gough Whitlam and Bob Hawke. ... Australias second-highest ranked political post is the position of Deputy Prime Minister of Australia. ... Brian Leslie Howe, AM (born 23 January 1936), Australian politician, was Deputy Prime Minister in the Labor government of Paul Keating from 1991 to 1995. ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... The Prime Minister of Australia is the head of government of the Commonwealth of Australia, holding office on commission from the Governor-General. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Representatives Senate Speaker of the House of Representatives David Hawker, Liberal Party since 16 November 2004 President of the Senate Alan Ferguson, Liberal Party since 14 August 2007 Members 226 (150 Representatives, 76 Senators) Political groups Liberal Party ALP National Party Country Liberal Party Greens... Blaxland is an Australian Electoral Division in New South Wales. ... Michael Hatton Michael John Hatton (born 28 August 1951), Australian politician, has been an Australian Labor Party member of the Australian House of Representatives since June 1996, representing the Division of Blaxland, New South Wales. ... Lionel Frost Bowen (born 28 December 1922), Australian politician, was a senior Labor figure, serving in the ministries of Gough Whitlam and Bob Hawke. ... ALP redirects here. ... Brian Leslie Howe, AM (born 23 January 1936), Australian politician, was Deputy Prime Minister in the Labor government of Paul Keating from 1991 to 1995. ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... ALP redirects here. ... For Kim Beazleys father, Kim Beazley senior, see Kim Edward Beazley. ... The Prime Minister of Australia is the head of government of the Commonwealth of Australia, holding office on commission from the Governor-General. ... Sir Edmund Barton, GCMG, QC (18 January 1849 – 7 January 1920), Australian politician and judge, was the first Prime Minister of Australia and a founding justice of the High Court of Australia. ... Alfred William Deakin (3 August 1856 – 7 October 1919), Australian politician, was a leader of the movement for Australian federation and later second Prime Minister of Australia. ... For other uses, see Chris Watson (musician). ... For other persons named George Reid, see George Reid (disambiguation). ... Andrew Fisher at the naming of Canberra ceremony, 1913 Andrew Fisher (29 August 1862 - 22 October 1928), Australianpolitician and fifth Prime Minister of Australia, was born in Crosshouse, a mining village near Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland. ... For the actor Joe Cook see Joe Cook (actor). ... For other persons named Billy Hughes, see Billy Hughes (disambiguation). ... Stanley Melbourne Bruce, 1st Viscount Bruce of Melbourne, CH, MC, FRS, PC (15 April 1883–25 August 1967), Australian politician and diplomat, was the eighth Prime Minister of Australia. ... James Henry Scullin (September 18, 1876 – January 28, 1953), Australian Labor politician and ninth Prime Minister of Australia. ... Joseph Aloysius Lyons (15 September 1879 – 7 April 1939), Australian politician, tenth Prime Minister of Australia. ... Sir Earle Christmas Grafton Page GCMG, CH (August 8, 1880–December 20, 1961), Australian politician, was the eleventh Prime Minister of Australia. ... Sir Robert Gordon Menzies, KT, AK, CH, FRS, QC (20 December 1894 – 15 May 1978), Australian politician, was the twelfth and longest-serving Prime Minister of Australia, serving eighteen and a half years. ... Sir Arthur William Fadden GCMG (April 13, 1895–April 21, 1973), Australian politician and 13th Prime Minister of Australia, born at Ingham, Queensland, the son of a Presbyterian police officer. ... This article is about the Australian Prime Minister. ... Francis Michael Forde (18 July 1890 – 28 January 1983) was an Australian politician and the 15th Prime Minister of Australia. ... Joseph Benedict Chifley (22 September 1885 – 13 June 1951), Australian politician and 16th Prime Minister of Australia, was one of Australias most influential Prime Ministers. ... Harold Edward Holt CH (5 August 1908 – presumed dead 17 December 1967) was an Australian politician who became the 17th Prime Minister of Australia in 1966. ... Sir John McEwen (March 29, 1900 - November 20, 1980), Australian politician and 18th Prime Minister of Australia, was born at Chiltern, Victoria, where his father was a pharmacist. ... Sir John Grey Gorton GCMG AC CH (9 September 1911 – 19 May 2002), Australian politician, was the 19th Prime Minister of Australia. ... Sir William McMahon, GCMG, CH (23 February 1908 – 31 March 1988), Australian politician and 20th Prime Minister of Australia, was born in Sydney, New South Wales, where his father was a lawyer. ... Edward Gough Whitlam, AC, QC (born 11 July 1916), known as Gough Whitlam (, pronounced Goff), is an Australian former politician and 21st Prime Minister of Australia. ... This article is about the former prime minister of Australia; for the Western Australian public servant, see Malcolm Fraser (surveyor). ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ... Kevin Michael Rudd (born 21 September 1957), is the leader of the federal Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition in the Australian Parliament. ... ALP redirects here. ... For other uses, see Chris Watson (musician). ... Andrew Fisher at the naming of Canberra ceremony, 1913 Andrew Fisher (29 August 1862 - 22 October 1928), Australianpolitician and fifth Prime Minister of Australia, was born in Crosshouse, a mining village near Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland. ... For other persons named Billy Hughes, see Billy Hughes (disambiguation). ... Hon Frank Tudor Frank Gwynne Tudor (27 January 1866 - 10 January 1922), Australian Labor politician, was born in Melbourne, Victoria, the son of working-class immigrants from Wales. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... James Henry Scullin (September 18, 1876 – January 28, 1953), Australian Labor politician and ninth Prime Minister of Australia. ... This article is about the Australian Prime Minister. ... Joseph Benedict Chifley (22 September 1885 – 13 June 1951), Australian politician and 16th Prime Minister of Australia, was one of Australias most influential Prime Ministers. ... Rt Hon Dr H.V. Evatt Dr Herbert Vere Evatt (April 30, 1894 - November 2, 1965), Australian jurist, politician and writer (generally known in his lifetime as Dr H.V. Evatt and popularly known as Doc) was born in Maitland, New South Wales, to a working-class family of Anglo... Rt Hon Arthur Calwell (with young migrant, 1949) Arthur Augustus Calwell (August 28, 1896 - July 8, 1973) Australian politician, was Leader of the Australian Labor Party from 1960 to 1967. ... Edward Gough Whitlam, AC, QC (born 11 July 1916), known as Gough Whitlam (, pronounced Goff), is an Australian former politician and 21st Prime Minister of Australia. ... William George Hayden AC (born 23 January 1933), Australian politician and 21st Governor-General of Australia, was born in Brisbane, Queensland, the son of an American-born sailor of Irish descent. ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... For Kim Beazleys father, Kim Beazley senior, see Kim Edward Beazley. ... Simon Findlay Crean (born 26 February 1949) an Australian politician, was leader of the Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition at the Federal level, from November 2001 to 2 December 2003. ... Mark William Latham (born 28 February 1961), a former Australian politician, was leader of the Federal Parliamentary Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition from December 2003 to January 2005. ... For Kim Beazleys father, Kim Beazley senior, see Kim Edward Beazley. ... Kevin Michael Rudd (born 21 September 1957), is the leader of the federal Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition in the Australian Parliament. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Paul Keating (186 words)
Paul John Keating (born January 18, 1944) was the twenty-fourth Prime Minister of Australia, from 1991 to 1996.
He led the Labor party to an unexpected election victory in 1993, where it is generally agreed that the attack he led on the Liberal Party's economic policies (including the electoral poison of a new value-added tax) was decisive.
These issues, which came to be known as Keating's "big picture" approach, were highly popular with the tertiary-educated middle class, but failed to capture the aspirations of rural and outer-suburban voters who swung to the Liberal Party in the 1996 election.
Paul Keating - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1790 words)
Paul John Keating (born 18 January 1944), was an Australian politician and the 24th Prime Minister of Australia, serving as Prime Minister from 1991 to 1996.
Keating was a backbencher for most of the Whitlam Labor government, but briefly became Minister for Northern Australia in 1975, one of the youngest ministers in Australian history.
Hawke was a lapsed Protestant; Keating was a practising Roman Catholic.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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