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Encyclopedia > Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies

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Mission To provide a professional education that simultaneously adheres to the highest standards of scholarship and takes a practical approach to training students for international leadership. To conduct scholarly research related to the concerns of public and private institutions of the United States and governments of other countries and disseminate that research to a broad audience concerned with foreign relations. To offer mid-career educational opportunities for those already working in international affairs.
Established 1943
Official name The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)
University The Johns Hopkins University
School type Private
Dean Jessica P. Einhorn
Location Washington, D.C., USA - Bologna, Italy - Nanjing, China
Enrollment 550 graduate

The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), based in Washington, D.C., is a graduate school devoted to the study of international affairs, economics, diplomacy, and policy research and education. SAIS is a part of The Johns Hopkins University. Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Johns Hopkins University is an internationally prestigious private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Jessica Einhorn currently serves as dean of The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of The Johns Hopkins University in Washington, D.C.. Einhorn succeeds Paul Wolfowitz who left in 2001 to become the U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Bologna (IPA , from Latin Bononia, BulÃ¥ggna in Emiliano-Romagnolo dialect) is the capital city of Emilia-Romagna in northern Italy, in the Pianura Padana, between the Po River and the Apennines, exactly between the Reno River and the Sàvena River. ... “Nanking” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 438 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (531 × 727 pixel, file size: 251 KB, MIME type: image/png) This is a logo of an organization, item, or event, and is protected by copyright and/or trademark. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For more information on international affairs, see one of the following links: Diplomacy Foreign affairs International relations This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... This article is about negotiations. ... Look up policy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Johns Hopkins University is an internationally prestigious private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland. ...

Contents

Institution

SAIS in Washington, D.C.
SAIS in Washington, D.C.

SAIS main campus is located on Massachusetts Avenue's Embassy Row, just off of Dupont Circle and a stone's throw away from the Brookings Institution, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, the Center for Global Development and the Peterson Institute. The school is regarded as a major center of political debate as it served as a base for a number of prominent political scientists and economists. Among them are political economy scholar Francis Fukuyama, political scientist and former National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski, and Middle East scholar Fouad Ajami. Photo of front entrance of the Johns Hopkins Universitys School of Advanced International Studies in Spring 2004. ... Photo of front entrance of the Johns Hopkins Universitys School of Advanced International Studies in Spring 2004. ... Massachusetts Avenue, colloquially abbreviated Mass. ... A look down R Street, just off Massachusetts Avenue in the Embassy Row area. ... Aerial photograph of Dupont Circle. ... The Brookings Institution is a United States nonprofit public policy think tank based in Washington, D.C.. Described in 1977, by TIME magazine as as the nations pre-eminent liberal think tank,[1] the institution is devoted to public service through research and education in the social sciences, particularly... The Endowments headquarters at 1779 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace is a private nonprofit organization promoting international cooperation and active international engagement by the United States of America. ... The Peterson Institute, formerly the Institute for International Economics, is a private, non-profit, and nonpartisan think tank focused on international economics, based in Washington, D.C.. It was founded by C. Fred Bergsten in 1981, in response to a proposal from the German Marshall Fund[1] . The Institutes... Yoshihiro Francis Fukuyama (b. ... The Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, commonly referred to as the National Security Advisor, serves as the chief advisor to the President of the United States on national security issues. ... Zbigniew Kazimierz Brzezinski (born March 28, 1928, Warsaw, Poland) is a Polish-American political scientist, geostrategist, and statesman. ... Fouad A. Ajami (Arabic:فؤاد عجمی; b. ...


SAIS is a global school with campuses in three continents. It has nearly 550 full-time students in Washington, D.C., 180 full-time students in Bologna, Italy and about 100 full-time students in Nanjing, China. Of these, 60% come from the United States and 40% from more than 66 other countries. Around 50% are women and 22% are U.S. minority groups. The SAIS Bologna Center is the only full-time international relations graduate program in Europe that operates under an American higher-education system, and the Hopkins-Nanjing Center, which teaches all of its courses in Chinese, is jointly administered by SAIS and Nanjing University. Bologna (IPA , from Latin Bononia, BulÃ¥ggna in Emiliano-Romagnolo dialect) is the capital city of Emilia-Romagna in northern Italy, in the Pianura Padana, between the Po River and the Apennines, exactly between the Reno River and the Sàvena River. ... “Nanking” redirects here. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      International relations (IR), a branch of political science, is the study of foreign affairs and global issues among states within the international system, including the roles of states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... // The Hopkins-Nanjing Center, located in Nanjing, China, was opened in 1986, by a joint venture between Nanjing University and The Johns Hopkins University. ... Nanjing University (Chinese: 南京大學/南京大学; Pinyin: NánjÄ«ng Dàxué; colloquially 南大, Pinyin: Nándà) is located in Nanjing (Nanking), an ancient capital of China. ...


Courses are taught in over 14 research departments, including International Economics, International Relations, Global Theory & History, International Law, Strategic Studies, Conflict Management, International Development, International Policy (formerly Energy, Environment, Science & Technology (EEST)), International Development, African studies, American Foreign Policy, Asian studies, China Studies, Japan Studies, Southeast Asia Studies, South Asia Studies, European Studies, Middle East Studies, Russian & Eurasian Studies, and Western Hemisphere Studies. ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      International relations (IR), a branch of political science, is the study of foreign affairs and global issues among states within the international system, including the roles of states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A strategy is a long term plan of action designed to achieve a particular goal, most often winning. Strategy is differentiated from tactics or immediate actions with resources at hand by its nature of being extensively premeditated, and often practically rehearsed. ... This article is about International Development. ... An Africanist is a specialist in African affairs, cultures, or languages. ... President of the United States, George W. Bush (right) at Camp David in March 2003, hosting the British Prime Minister Tony Blair. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Eurasian nomads are a large group of peoples of the steppes of Central Asia, Mongolia and Eastern Europe (Pontic steppe). ... The geographical western hemisphere of Earth, highlighted in yellow. ...


SAIS offers multi-disciplinary instruction leading to the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of International Public Policy (MIPP, a mid-career full-time degree), and Doctor of Philosophy. Around 250 students graduate from SAIS Washington, D.C. campus each year from the two-year Master of Arts program in International Relations and International Economics. SAIS also maintains formal joint-degree programs with the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Stanford Law School, the University of Virginia School of Law, and the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      International relations (IR), a branch of political science, is the study of foreign affairs and global issues among states within the international system, including the roles of states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania is a business school at the University of Pennsylvania, USA. The school was founded by Joseph Wharton, who also was one of the founders of Swarthmore College (founded in 1864), in 1881 as the first collegiate business school in the United States. ... The University of Pennsylvania (also known as Penn[3][4]) is a private, coeducational research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration is the business school of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health was founded in 1916 by William H. Welch and John D. Rockefeller. ... Stanford Law School is a graduate school at Stanford University located near Palo Alto, California in Silicon Valley. ... The University of Virginia School of Law was founded in Charlottesville in 1819 by Thomas Jefferson as one of the original subjects taught at his academical village, the University of Virginia. ... The Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs is a leading public policy school in the United States, and a part of Syracuse University. ... Syracuse University (SU) is a private nonsectarian research university located in Syracuse, New York. ...


Since 1990, SAIS and the Fletcher School have been the only non-law schools in the United States to participate in the prestigious Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition. Although SAIS students obviously enter the competition with a comparative disadvantage (all of those against whom they compete have at least a year of law school training), they have performed very well. SAIS has twice placed second overall out of 12 schools and advanced to the "final four" in its region. In head-to-head competitions, SAIS has defeated law schools such as Georgetown, Maryland, and Virginia. The Cabot Intercultural Center of The Fletcher School at Tufts University The Fletcher School (also called The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy) is the oldest graduate school of international relations in the United States. ... Philip C. Jessup (January 5, 1897 - January 31, 1986) was a diplomat, scholar, and jurist from New York City. ...


A College of William & Mary study examined graduate international relations programs throughout the United States, interviewing over 1,000 professionals in the field, with the results subsequently published in the November/December 2005 issue of Foreign Policy (FP) magazine. One of study's questions asked: "What do you consider the top five terminal masters programs in international relations for students looking to pursue a policy career?" From the study, 65% of respondents named Johns Hopkins University-SAIS as being the top-ranked program. SAIS received the most votes, followed by Georgetown (Walsh), Harvard (Kennedy), Tufts (Fletcher), and Columbia (SIPA), respectively. Wren Building with a snow-covered statue of Lord Botetourt. ... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ...


History

SAIS was founded in 1943 by Paul H. Nitze and Christian Herter and became part of The Johns Hopkins University in 1950. The school was established during World War II by a group of statesmen who sought new methods of preparing men and women to cope with the international responsibilities that would be thrust upon the United States in the postwar world. Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Paul Henry Nitze (January 16, 1907 - October 19, 2004) was a high-ranking United States government official who helped shape Cold War defense policy over the course of numerous presidential administrations. ... For the American physician (1865–1910), see Christian Archibald Herter (physician). ... The Johns Hopkins University is an internationally prestigious private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The founders assembled a faculty of scholars and professionals to teach international relations, international economics, and foreign languages to a small group of students. The curriculum was designed to be both scholarly and practical. The natural choice for the location of the school was Washington, D.C., a city where international resources are abundant and where American foreign policy is shaped and set in motion. When the school opened in 1944, 15 students were enrolled.[1] 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


In 1955, the school created the Bologna Center in Italy, the first full-time graduate school located in Europe under the American higher-education system. By 1963, SAIS outgrew its first quarters on Florida Avenue and moved to one of its present buildings on Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington DC. In 1986, the Hopkins-Nanjing Center was created in Nanjing, China, completing the school's global presence. Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... The Bologna Center of the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University, is an academic and research center located in Bologna, Italy. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... // The Hopkins-Nanjing Center, located in Nanjing, China, was opened in 1986, by a joint venture between Nanjing University and The Johns Hopkins University. ... “Nanking” redirects here. ...


Research Centers

  • Central Asia-Caucasus Institute
  • Center For Constitutional Studies And Democratic Development (Italy)
  • Center for Displacement Studies
  • Center for International Business and Public Policy
  • Center for Strategic Education
  • Center for Transatlantic Relations
  • The Dialogue Project
  • Foreign Policy Institute
  • Hopkins-Nanjing Research Center (China)
  • Institute for International Research (China)
  • International Energy and Environment Program (IEEP)
  • International Reporting Project
  • Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies
  • Protection Project
  • Reischauer Center for East Asia Studies
  • Schwartz Forum on Constructive Capitalism
  • SME Institute
  • Swiss Foundation for World Affairs
  • U.S.-Korea Institute

Publications

In addition to the different books and periodicals edited by SAIS departements or research centers, several school-wide publications are to be mentioned:

  • Bologna Center Journal of International Affairs, published annually and founded in 1994, is a student-run journal focused on scholarly contributions to international relations.
  • Centerpiece, Nanjing Center's alumni newsletter.
  • Guide To Experts in International Affairs, published every two years.
  • SAIS Observer is a student-written, student-run newspaper.
  • SAISphere, published annually, features articles about current issues in international affairs, alumni class notes, as well as happenings at the school's campuses.
  • SAIS Reports, a newsletter published bimonthly from September through May, highlights new faculty, research institutes, academic programs, student and alumni accomplishments as well as major events at the school.
  • SAIS Review, founded in 1956, journal dedicated to advancing the debate on leading contemporary issues of world affairs.
  • Working Paper Series, managed by the PhD students.

The Bologna Center Journal of International Affairs is an academic journal founded in 1994. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... SAIS Review is an academic journal founded as an alumni newsletter in 1956. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Prominent past and present faculty and administrators

Fouad A. Ajami (Arabic:فؤاد عجمی; b. ... The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an influential and independent, nonpartisan foreign policy membership organization founded in 1921 and based at 58 East 68th Street (corner Park Avenue) in New York City, with an additional office in Washington, D.C. Through its membership, meetings, and studies, it has been... Peter Bergen (born December 12, 1962) is a print and television journalist and author who appears as a terrorism analyst on CNN. Bergen is known for conducting the first television interview with Osama Bin Laden in 1997. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... Zbigniew Kazimierz Brzezinski (born March 28, 1928, Warsaw, Poland) is a Polish-American political scientist, geostrategist, and statesman. ... The Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, commonly referred to as the National Security Advisor, serves as the chief advisor to the President of the United States on national security issues. ... Order: 39th President Term of Office: January 20, 1977–January 20, 1981 Preceded by: Gerald Ford Succeeded by: Ronald Reagan Date of birth: October 1, 1924 Place of birth: Plains, Georgia Date of death: Place of death: First Lady: Rosalynn Carter Political party: Democratic Vice President: Walter Mondale James... David P. Calleo is an American intellectual and political economist, based at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. ... Rajiv Chandrasekaran is an American journalist. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Eliot A. Cohen Eliot A. Cohen a professor at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at Johns Hopkins University. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... Warner Max Corden (b. ... This article is about the economic phenomenon. ... Francis Deng is Research Professor of International Law, Politics and Society and the Director of the Center for Displacement Studies at the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at Johns Hopkins University. ... The Secretary-General of the United Nations is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal organs of the United Nations. ... Tailor in Labuje IDP camp in Uganda An internally displaced person (IDP) is someone who has been forced to leave their home for reasons such as religious or political persecution, war or natural disaster, but has not crossed an international border. ... Dr. Luis Ernesto Derbez Derbez with Condoleezza Rice Dr. Luis Ernesto Derbez Bautista (born April 1, 1947 in Mexico City) is a Mexican politician. ... Jessica Einhorn currently serves as dean of The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of The Johns Hopkins University in Washington, D.C.. Einhorn succeeds Paul Wolfowitz who left in 2001 to become the U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense. ... Time Warner Inc. ... The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an influential and independent, nonpartisan foreign policy membership organization founded in 1921 and based at 58 East 68th Street (corner Park Avenue) in New York City, with an additional office in Washington, D.C. Through its membership, meetings, and studies, it has been... The World Bank (the Bank), a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), was formally established on December 27, 1945, following the ratification of the Bretton Woods agreement. ... Yoshihiro Francis Fukuyama (b. ... The End of History and the Last Man is a 1992 book by Francis Fukuyama, expanding on his 1989 essay The End of History?, published in the international affairs journal The National Interest. ... Grace Goodell is a professor of International Development at The Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. ... For the American physician (1865–1910), see Christian Archibald Herter (physician). ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Dr. Josef Joffe Josef Joffe is editor and publisher of Die Zeit, a weekly German newspaper, the Marc and Anita Abramowitz Fellow in International Relations at the Hoover Institution, a fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and adjunct professor of political science at Stanford University, and an... Majid Khadduri (1908 — January 25, 2007) was an Iraqi–born founder of the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies Middle East Studies program. ... Kenneth H. Keller was the twelfth president of the University of Minnesota, serving from 1985 to 1988. ... The University of Minnesota is a large university with several campuses spread throughout the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... Anne O. Krueger (2004) Anne O. Krueger has been the First Deputy Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund since September 1, 2001. ... “IMF” redirects here. ... The position of World Bank Chief Economist is one of the most influential in economics. ... The American Economic Association, or AEA, is the oldest and most important professional organization in the field of economics. ... Cordwainer Smith – pronounced CORDwainer Smith – was the pseudonym used by American author Paul Myron Anthony Linebarger (July 11, 1913 – August 6, 1966) for his science fiction works. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Marisa Lino (1950) is an American diplomat. ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... Michael Mandelbaum is the Christian A. Herter Professor and Director of the American Foreign Policy program at the Johns Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studies. ... John E. McLaughlin, Acting Director of Central Intelligence, 2004. ... “CIA” redirects here. ... The Brookings Institution is a United States nonprofit public policy think tank based in Washington, D.C.. Described in 1977, by TIME magazine as as the nations pre-eminent liberal think tank,[1] the institution is devoted to public service through research and education in the social sciences, particularly... Robert Alexander Mundell (born October 24, 1932) is a Canadian economist who graduated from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. ... The Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (in Swedish Sveriges Riksbanks pris i ekonomisk vetenskap till Alfred Nobels minne), is a prize awarded each year for outstanding intellectual contributions in the field of economics. ... Azar Nafisi speaking at the 2004 National Book Festival in Washington D.C. Azar Nafisi, Ph. ... In modern times there have been a number of liberal movements within Islam (sometimes called in Arabic: الإسلام الإجتهادية or interpretation-based Islam, also الإسلام الم&#1578... Reading Lolita in Tehran Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books is a book by Iranian author and professor, Azar Nafisi. ... Paul Henry Nitze (January 16, 1907 - October 19, 2004) was a high-ranking United States government official who helped shape Cold War defense policy over the course of numerous presidential administrations. ... NSC 68 was a policy paper written by the National Security Council for President Harry Truman providing a comprehensive analysis of the capabilities of the Soviet Union and of the United States of America from military, economic, political and psychological standpoints. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... This article is about foreign policy. ... Don Oberdorfer is an American professor at Johns Hopkins University and was a journalist for 38 years, 25 of them with the Washington Post. ... This article is about the Korean peninsula and civilization. ... Riordan Roett Riordan Roett is an influential American political scientist specialized in Latin America. ... Professor Lord Robert Skidelsky, more properly Robert Jacob Alexander Skidelsky, Baron Skidelsky of Tilton, is a British economist, author of a major biography in three volumes of John Maynard Keynes, and a life peer. ... John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes, CB (pronounced cains, IPA ) (5 June 1883 – 21 April 1946) was a British economist whose ideas, called Keynesian economics, had a major impact on modern economic and political theory as well as on many governments fiscal policies. ... R. Jeffrey Smith is a reporter at the Washington Post and was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting in 2006. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Stephen Szabo is a prominent scholar of German-American and Transatlantic Relations. ... Shirin R. Tahir-Kheli is a currently an assistant to the president and a director for Democracy, Human Rights and International Operations. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Dale Cairns Thomson Ph. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... Louis Stephen St. ... Ruth Wedgwood (née Glushien) is an American international law professor at Johns Hopkins University. ... Paul Dundes Wolfowitz (born December 22, 1943) is a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, working on issues of international economic development, Africa and public-private partnerships. ... The World Bank (the Bank), a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), was formally established on December 27, 1945, following the ratification of the Bretton Woods agreement. ... I. William Zartman is head of the conflict management department at the School of Advanced International Studies of Johns Hopkins University. ...

Prominent alumni and former students

SAIS has more than 10,000 alumni working in approximately 140 countries. Over 130 SAIS graduates have become ambassadors throughout the world.[2] An alumn (with a silent n), alum, alumnus, or alumna is a former student of a college, university, or school. ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ...

Madeleine Korbel Albright (born Marie Jana Korbelová, IPA: , on May 15, 1937) was the first woman to become United States Secretary of State. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... Mahamat Ali Adoum (born 14 November 1947) is a politician and ambassador from Chad. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... Peter F. Allgeier was the Acting United States Trade Representative from February 18 to April 29, 2005. ... The Office of the United States Trade Representative, or USTR, is an arm of the executive branch of the United States government. ... Robert Orris Blake, Jr. ... Wolf Blitzer (born March 22, 1948 in Buffalo, New York) is an American journalist and author. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Jeremy Bowen has been Middle East Editor for BBC News since June 2005. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Gayleatha B. Brown, U.S. Ambassador to Benin Gayleatha Beatrice Brown is a United States foreign service officer and ambassador. ... R. Nicholas Burns For other people named Burns, see Burns (disambiguation). ... NATO 2002 Summit The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), sometimes called North Atlantic Alliance, Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for defence collaboration established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on April 4, 1949. ... Chung Mong Joon, or Chung Mong-joon, (born October 17, 1951 in Busan, South Korea) is the vice president of FIFA and the president of the Korean Football Association. ... Doug Carlston was CEO, chairman, and co-founder (with brother Gary) of Brøderbund Software, a software publishing firm that produced such hit titles as Myst and Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?. Brøderbund was acquired by The Learning Company for $420 million, and the combined company was... Brøderbund Software was a maker of computer games, educational software and the Print Shop productivity tools. ... US Interest Section Chief in Cuba. ... For other persons named Herman Cohen, see Herman Cohen (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Geography Country Belgium Community French Community Region Walloon Region Province Liège Arrondissement Liège Coordinates , , Area 69. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The Project for the New American Century, or PNAC, is a Washington, DC based think tank. ... The National Interest is a prominent quarterly international affairs journal, founded in 1985 by Irving Kristol and currently published by the Nixon Center. ... John Caspar Dreier (1906 - 1994) was a U.S. diplomat. ... Headquarters Washington, D.C. Official languages English, French, Spanish, Portuguese Membership 35 countries Leaders  -  Secretary General José Miguel Insulza (since 26 May 2005) Establishment  -  Charter first signed 30 April 1948 in effect 1 December 1951  Website http://www. ... Hermann Eilts (1922-October 12, 2006) is a former U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia and Egypt who assisted Henry Kissingers Mideast shuttle diplomacy effort, worked with Egyptian President Anwar el-Sadat throughout the Camp David Accords, and dodged a Libyan hit team. ... Anwar Sadat Mohamed Anwar el-Sadat ( Arabic : محمد انور السادات ) (December 25, 1918 - October 6, 1981) was an Egyptian politician and President from 1970 to 1981. ... Celebrating the signing of the Camp David Accords: Menachem Begin, Jimmy Carter, Anwar Al Sadat. ... Jessica Einhorn currently serves as dean of The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of The Johns Hopkins University in Washington, D.C.. Einhorn succeeds Paul Wolfowitz who left in 2001 to become the U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense. ... Time Warner Inc. ... The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an influential and independent, nonpartisan foreign policy membership organization founded in 1921 and based at 58 East 68th Street (corner Park Avenue) in New York City, with an additional office in Washington, D.C. Through its membership, meetings, and studies, it has been... The World Bank (the Bank), a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), was formally established on December 27, 1945, following the ratification of the Bretton Woods agreement. ... McKinsey & Company is a privately owned management consulting firm that focuses on solving issues of concern to senior management in large corporations and organizations. ... This article should appear in one or more categories. ... Jeffrey Garten Jeffrey E. Garten (born October 29, 1946) was the Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade under the Clinton administration and former Dean of the Yale School of Management. ... The Yale School of Management (also known as Yale SOM) is the graduate business school of Yale University and is located on Hillhouse Avenue in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Yale SOM offers M.B.A. and Ph. ... Timothy F. Geithner, President of the New York Fed Timothy F. Geithner is the 9th president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. ... The Federal Reserve Bank of New York is the most important of the twelve Federal Reserve Banks of the United States. ... 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References

  1. ^ Gutner, Tammi L. “The Story of SAIS”. Washington, DC: School of Advanced International Studies, The Johns Hopkins University, 1987.
  2. ^ See http://www.sais-jhu.edu/pubaffairs/FactSheet01.pdf

External links

  • SAIS Website
  • SAIS Bologna Center Website
  • Hopkins-Nanjing Center Website
  • SAIS Wharton Joint Degree Program
  • SAIS Review, Journal of International Affairs
  • International Reporting Project
  • BCJournal, Bologna Center Journal of International Affairs

 
 

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