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Encyclopedia > Paul Fleischman

Paul Fleischman is an American children's author, and is the son of Newbery Medal winner Sid Fleischman. Paul Fleischman won the 1989 Newbery Award for his book Joyful Noise: Poems for Two Voices. The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the most outstanding American book for children. ... Albert Sidney Fleischman (born March 16, 1920 in Brooklyn, New York, and a longtime resident of Santa Monica, California, USA) is a Newbery award-winning author of popular childrens books such as: By The Great Horn Spoon! The Whipping Boy The Thirteenth Floor The Ghost In The Noonday Sun...


Paul Fleischman grew up in Santa Monica, California, hearing his father, Sid Fleischman, read his books aloud chapter by chapter, as they were written. Both have won the Newbery Medal, Sid for The Whipping Boy in 1987, and Paul for Joyful Noise: Poems for Two Voices in 1989.


When 19, after two years of college in Berkeley, Paul took a cross-country bicycle and train trip, he ended up living in a 200-year-old house in New Hampshire. The years there, leading a modified 18th century lifestyle--wood heating, no electricity or phone--kindled an interest in the past which led to the historical fiction he would later write.


Over the years, Paul has dealt with the Puritans' Indian wars, Philadelphia's yellow fever epidemic, the Civil War, and the naturalists Townsend and Nuttall.


He has two grown sons, Seth and Dana. After sojourns in Vermont, Nebraska, New Mexico, France, and North Carolina, he is now back in California, living in the village of Aromas with his wife, Patty.


Paul Fleischman Bibliography

  • Half-A-Moon Inn (1980)
  • Finzel the Far-Sighted (1983)
  • Graven Images (1983)
  • Joyful Noise: Poems for Two Voices (1989)
  • Saturnalia (1990)
  • The Borning Room (1991)
  • Time Train (1991)
  • Bull Run (1993)
  • A Fate Totally Worse than Death (1995)
  • Seedfolks (1997)
  • Whirligig (1998)
  • Mind's Eye (1999)
  • Weslandia (1999)
  • Big Talk: Poems for Four Voices (2000)
  • Lost: A Story in String (2000)
  • Cannibal in the Mirror (2000)
  • Zap (2005)

Written by Newberry Winner Paul Fleischman, the novel is the monolgouges of sixteen fictious characters and how they connect to the First Battle of Bull Run in the American Civil War in 1861. ... A Fate Totally Worse than Death is a book written by Paul Fleischman in 1995. ... Seedfolks by Newbery Medal winner Paul Fleischman is a childrens book about the impromptu creation of a community garden in an inner-city Cleveland. ... A whirligig is an object that spins or whirls, or has at least one member that spins or whirls. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Houghton Mifflin Reading: Meet Paul Fleischman (261 words)
Paul Fleischman, the son of the well-known writer Sid Fleischman, grew up surrounded by the sound of language.
From this experience, Paul Fleischman says, "We grew up knowing that words felt good in the ears and on the tongue, that they were as much fun to play with as toys." Music was also an important part of the Fleischman household.
Fleischman still does this in a way, gathering together forgotten bits of history and quirky facts he learns from old books as he crafts a new piece of writing.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Paul Fleischman (624 words)
Paul Fleischman is an American children's author, and is the son of Newbery Medal winner Sid Fleischman.
Paul Fleischman grew up in Santa Monica, California, hearing his father, Sid Fleischman, read his books aloud chapter by chapter, as they were written.
Written by Newberry Winner Paul Fleischman, the novel is the monolgouges of sixteen fictious characters and how they connect to the First Battle of Bull Run in the American Civil War in 1861.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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