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Encyclopedia > Paul Douglas

This article is about the economist and senator; Paul Douglas. For other uses, see:

Paul Howard Douglas
Paul Douglas

U.S. Senator, Illinois
In office
19491967
Preceded by Charles W. Brooks
Succeeded by Charles H. Percy

Born March 26, 1892
Salem, Massachusetts
Died September 24, 1976
Washington, DC
Political party Democratic
Spouse Dorothy Wolff Douglas, divorced

Emily Taft Douglas, deceased Paul Douglas in Angels in the Outfield Paul Douglas (April 11, 1907 - September 11, 1959) was an American movie actor born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania The 511 actor is best remembered by some for two baseball comedy movies, Angels in the Outfield (1951) and It Happens Every Spring (1949). ... Paul Douglas was a meteorologist for WCCO-TV and founded EarthWatch Communications in 1990. ... Paul Douglas (1958 – May 29, 2006) was a CBS News cameraman, who, along with a soundman James Brolan, was killed in an explosion in Iraq on May 29, 2006. ... Image File history File links Paul_Douglas. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Charles Wayland Brooks (March 8, 1897 – January 14, 1957) was a Republican U.S. Senator from Illinois from 1940 to 1949. ... Charles Harting Percy (born September 27, 1919) was chairman of the Bell & Howell Corporation from 1949 to 1964 and Republican United States Senator for Illinois from 1967 to 1985. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (86th in leap years). ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Settled: 1626 â€“ Incorporated: 1626 Zip Code(s): 01970 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... Emily Taft Douglas (April 19, 1899-January 28th, 1994) was a Democratic Party politician from the U.S. state of Illinois. ...

Paul Howard Douglas (March 26, 1892September 24, 1976) was an American politician and University of Chicago economist. He served as a Democratic U.S. Senator from Illinois from 1949 to 1967. March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (86th in leap years). ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      Politics of the United States of America takes place in a framework of a federal presidential... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... Face-to-face trading interactions among on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor Economics or oeconomics is the study of human choice behaviour. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ...

Contents

Early years

Douglas was born on March 26, 1892 in the small town of Salem, Massachusetts. When he was four, his mother died of natural causes and his father remarried. His father was an abusive husband and his stepmother, unable to obtain a divorce, left her husband and took Douglas and his older brother to Newport, Maine, where her brother and uncle had built a resort in the woods. March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (86th in leap years). ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Settled: 1626 â€“ Incorporated: 1626 Zip Code(s): 01970 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... Spousal abuse is a specific form of domestic violence where physical or sexual abuse is perpetuated by one spouse upon another. ... It has been suggested that Divorcee be merged into this article or section. ... Newport is a town located in Penobscot County, Maine. ...


Academia and family life

Douglas graduated from Bowdoin College with a Phi Beta Kappa key in 1913, then moved on to Columbia University, where he earned a master's degree and a PhD in economics. In 1915, he married Dorothy Wolff, a graduate of Bryn Mawr College who had also earned a PhD at Columbia. Bowdoin College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1794, located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Key The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an academic honor society with the mission of fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Columbia University is a private university whose main campus lies in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of the Borough of Manhattan in New York City. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate (or graduate) course of one to three years in duration. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Face-to-face trading interactions among on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor Economics or oeconomics is the study of human choice behaviour. ... Bryn Mawr is also the name of an official neighborhood of the city of Minneapolis, Minnesota. ...


Over the next six years, Douglas studied at Harvard University, taught at the University of Illinois, Oregon's Reed College, and the University of Washington, and served as a mediator of labor disputes for the Emergency Fleet Corporation of Pennsylvania. During these years, he also converted from Episcopalianism and joined the Religious Society of Friends. Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Official language(s) None Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... Reed College is a liberal arts college with 1350 students as of the autumn of 2005 (45% men and 55% women), located in Portland, Oregon in the Eastmoreland neighborhood. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... The United States Shipping Board Merchant Fleet Corporation was a federal corporation that operated from 1917 until 1936 when its functions were assumed by the newly created U.S. Maritime Commission. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul is the National Cathedral of the USA in Washington, D.C. The Episcopal Church, also known as the Episcopal Church in the USA (ECUSA) or the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America is the American branch of the... The Religious Society of Friends (commonly known as Quakers) began in England in the 17th century by people who were dissatisfied with the existing denominations and sects of Christianity. ...


In 1920, Douglas took a job teaching economics at the University of Chicago. In 1921, he met social reformer Jane Addams and became interested in politics. Although Douglas enjoyed his job, his wife was unable to obtain a job at the university due to anti-nepotism rules. When she obtained a job at Smith College, she convinced her husband to move with her and teach at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Douglas soon decided that the situation was untenable and, in 1930, the couple divorced, with Dorothy taking custody of their four children and Douglas returning to Chicago. The following year, Douglas met and married Emily Taft Dougas, a fellow social reformer and academic. Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jane Addams Jane Addams (September 9, 1860 – May 21, 1935) was an American social worker, sociologist, philosopher and reformer. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Nepotism This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Smith College, located in Northampton, Massachusetts, is the largest womens college in the United States[citation needed]. The college remains strongly committed to the education of women at the undergraduate level, but Smith admits both men and women as graduate students. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ...


The Cobb-Douglas function, used extensively in economics, is named for him. In economics, the Cobb-Douglas functional form of production functions is widely used to represent the relationship of an output to inputs. ...


Government service and city politics

As the 1920s drew to a close, Douglas got more involved in politics. He served as an economic advisor to Republican Governor Gifford Pinchot of Pennsylvania and Democratic Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York. Along with Chicago lawyer Harold L. Ickes, he launched a campaign against public utility tycoon Samuel Insull's stock market manipulations. Working with the state legislature, he helped draft laws regulating utilities and establishing old-age pensions and unemployment insurance. By the early 1930s, he was vice chairman of the League for Independent Political Action, a member of the Farmer-Labor Party's national committee, and treasurer of the American Commonwealth Political Federation. For other uses, see Republican Party (disambiguation) or GOP (disambiguation). ... Gifford Pinchot Gifford Bryce Pinchot test (August 11, 1865 – October 4, 1946) was the first Chief of the United States Forest Service (1905–1910) and the Republican Governor of Pennsylvania (1923–1927, 1931–1935). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... FDR redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Harold LeClair Ickes (March 15, 1874–February 3, 1952) was a U.S. administrator and political figure. ... A public utility is a company that maintains the infrastructure for a public service. ... Samuel Insull (November 11, 1859 - July 16, 1938) was an investor in Chicago who was known for purchasing utilities and railroads. ... The New York Stock Exchange A stock market is a market for the trading of company stock, and derivatives of same; both of these are securities listed on a stock exchange as well as those only traded privately. ... A pension is a steady income given to a person (usually after retirement). ... Unemployment benefits are payments made by governments to unemployed people. ... Farmer-Labor Party was a political party of Minnesota. ...


A registered Independent, Douglas felt that the Democratic Party was too corrupt and the Republican Party was too reactionary, views that he expressed in a 1932 book, The Coming of a New Party, in which he called for the creation of a party similar to the British Labour Party. That year, he voted for Socialist candidate Norman Thomas for President of the United States. 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States. ... Norman Thomas Norman Mattoon Thomas (November 20, 1884 - December 19, 1968) was a leading American socialist, pacifist, and six-time presidential candidate for the Socialist Party of America. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ...


After Roosevelt's victory in the election, Douglas, at the recommendation of his friend Harold Ickes, was appointed to serve on the Consumers' Advisory Board of the National Recovery Administration. In 1935, however, the Supreme Court ruled that the Administration was unconstitutional and it was abolished. NRA Blue Eagle poster. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the judicial branch of the United States federal government. ...


That year, Douglas made his first foray into electoral politics, campaigning for the endorsement of the local Republican Party for mayor of Chicago. Although the party endorsed someone else, Douglas continued to work with them to get their candidate elected to the city council from the 5th Ward. A strong Socialist candidate split the reform vote, however, and Democrat James Cusack, a member of the infamous Cook County political machine, was elected. Richard M. Daley is the current mayor of Chicago. ... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... The Cook County Democratic Organization was one of the most powerful political machines in American history. ...


Four years later, in 1939, Cusack came up for re-election, and Douglas joined a group of reform-minded Independents in attempting to select a suitable challenger. The group decided that Douglas was the best candidate for the position and he was summarily drafted. During the election, Mayor Ed Kelly, a leader of the machine who was in a tough fight for re-election, attempted to shore up his reputation by lending his support to Douglas' campaign. With Kelly's help, and his own dogged campaigning, Douglas managed a narrow victory over Cusack in a runoff election. 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Political drafts are used to encourage or compel a certain person to enter a political race, by demonstrating a significant groundswell of support for the candidate. ... Edward Joseph Kelly (born: May 1, 1876; died: October 20, 1950; buried in Calvary Cemetery) served as mayor of Chicago, Illinois (1933-1947) for the Democratic Party. ... An example of runoff voting. ...


A reformer on a council full of machine politicians and grafters, Douglas usually found himself in the minority. His attempts to reform the public education system and lower public transportation fares were met with derision and he typically ended up on the losing end of 49-1 votes. "I have three degrees," Douglas once said after a particularly close-fought rout. "I have been associated with intelligent and intellectual people for many years. Some of these aldermen haven't gone through the fifth grade. But they're the smartest bunch of bastards I ever saw grouped together." // Public education is education mandated for the children of the general public by the government, whether national, regional, or local, provided by an institution of civil government, and paid for, in whole or in part, by taxes. ... Skytrain Bangkok. ...


In 1942, Douglas officially joined the Democratic Party and ran for its nomination for the United States Senate. He had the support of a cadre of left-wing activists, but the machine supported the state's at-large Congressman Raymond S. McKeough for the nomination. On the day of the primary, Douglas carried 99 of the state's 102 counties, but McKeough's strong support in Cook County allowed him to win a slim majority. He would go on to lose in the general election to incumbent Republican Senator Charles W. Brooks. Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Raymond Stephen McKeough (April 29, 1888 – December 16, 1979) was a Democratic politician who served as a U.S. Representative from Illinois from 1935 to 1943. ... A primary election is an election in which registered voters in a jurisdiction select the candidates who will enter a subsequent election (nominating primary). ... Charles Wayland Brooks (March 8, 1897 – January 14, 1957) was a Republican U.S. Senator from Illinois from 1940 to 1949. ...


Military service

The day after losing the primary, Douglas resigned from the Chicago City Council and signed up with the United States Marine Corps as a private. Wanting to see front line duty, Douglas accepted a commission as a captain. Although he was then fifty years old, Douglas was in good physical shape and had some pull with Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox, the former publisher of the Chicago Daily News, who arranged for Douglas to see duty in the Pacific Theater of Operations. The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces to global crises. ... An officer is a member of a military or naval service who holds a position of responsibility. ... This article concerns the rank and title of Captain. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Frank Knox William Franklin Frank Knox (January 1, 1874–April 28, 1944) was the Secretary of the Navy under Franklin D. Roosevelt during most of World War II. He was also the Republican vice presidential candidate in 1936. ... The Chicago Daily News was an afternoon daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois, and published between 1876 and 1978. ... A map of the Pacific Theatre. ...


On the second day of the Battle of Peleliu, Douglas finally saw action when his unit waded into the fray. He won a Bronze Star Medal for carrying ammunition to the front lines under enemy fire and won his first Purple Heart when he was grazed by shrapnel. Combatants United States Japan Commanders William H. Rupertus, USMC Kunio Nakagawa Strength 2 divisions (1st Marine Division and the USA 81st Infantry Division) Approximately 11,000 men Casualties 2,336 killed and 8,450 wounded 10,695 killed, 202 captured The Battle of Peleliu, like the bloody World War II... The Bronze Star Medal is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration and is the fourth highest award for bravery, heroism or meritorious service. ... A Purple Heart medal For the plant genus, see Purpleheart. ...


A few months later, during the Battle of Okinawa, Douglas won his second Purple Heart. A volunteer rifleman in an infantry platoon, he was advancing on the Naha-Shuri line when a burst of machine gun fire tore through his left arm, severing the main nerve and leaving it effectively useless. Combatants United States U.K. Canada New Zealand Australia Empire of Japan Commanders Simon B. Buckner, Jr. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, or other means. ... A machine gun is a fully-automatic firearm that is capable of firing bullets in rapid succession. ...


After a thirteen-month stay in the National Naval Medical Center at Bethesda, Maryland, Douglas was given an honorable discharge as a Lieutenant Colonel with full disability pay. The National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, also known as the Bethesda Naval Hospital, is considered the flagship of the United States Navys system of medical centers. ... Bethesda is an urbanized, but unincorporated, area in Montgomery County, Maryland, near Washington, D.C. It takes its name from a church located there, the Bethesda Presbyterian Church, built in 1820 and rebiult in 1850, which in turn took its name from the Aramaic words Beth Hesda, meaning house of... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ...


Campaign for the Senate

While Douglas had been serving in the Marines, his wife, Emily, had been nominated to run against isolationist Republican Congressman Stephen A. Day, who had succeeded Raymond McKeough. Although she had defeated Day in the 1944 election, a Republican upsurge had unseated her in 1946, the same year that Douglas left the Marines. Isolationism is a foreign policy which combines a non-interventionist military and a political policy of economic nationalism (protectionism). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


Deciding to enter politics once again, Douglas let it be generally known that he wished to seek the office of Governor of Illinois in 1948. Cook County machine boss Jacob M. Arvey, however, had a different plan. At the time, several scandals had broken out over the machine's activities, and Arvey decided that Douglas, a scholar and war hero with a reputation for incorruptability, would be the perfect nominee to run against Senator Brooks. Since Brooks was hugely popular in the state and had a large campaign warchest, Arvey decide that there was no danger of Douglas winning. The Governor of Illinois is the chief executive of the State of Illinois and the various agencies and departments over which the officer has jurisdiction, as prescribed in the state constitution. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A scandal is a widely publicized incident involving allegations of wrong-doing, disgrace, or moral outrage. ...


At the outset of the campaign, Douglas' chances looked slim. As a delegate to the 1948 Democratic National Convention, he had tried to draft General Dwight D. Eisenhower for President, calling President Harry S. Truman "incompetent." The 1948 Democratic National Convention was held in Philadelphia from July 12 to July 14, and resulted in the nomination of President Harry Truman for President and of Alben Barkley for Vice President. ... This page is about Dwight D. Eisenhower. ... Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884–December 26, 1972) was the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953); as Vice President, he succeeded to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ...


Douglas, however, proved to be a tenacious campaigner. He stumped across the state in a Jeep station wagon for the Marshall Plan, civil rights, repeal of the Taft-Hartley Act, more public housing, and more social security programs. During six months of non-stop campaigning, he traveled more than 40,000 miles around the state and delivered more than 1,100 speeches. When Senator Brooks refused to debate him, Douglas debated an empty chair, switching from seat to seat as he provided both his own answers and Brooks'. For other uses, see Jeep (disambiguation). ... Estate car body style (Saab 95) A station wagon (United States usage), wagon (Australian usage, though station wagon is widely used) or estate car (United Kingdom usage) is a car body style similar to a sedan car but with an extended rear cargo area. ... Map of Cold-War era Europe showing countries that received Marshall Plan aid. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... The Labor-Management Relations Act, commonly known as the Taft-Hartley Act, is a United States federal law that severely restricts the activities and power of labor unions. ... A local authority tower block in Cwmbrân, South Wales Public housing or project homes is a form of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local. ... Social security primarily refers to a field of social welfare concerned with social protection, or protection against socially recognized conditions, including poverty, old age, disability, unemployment, families with children and others. ...


On Election Day, Douglas won an upset victory, taking 55 percent of the vote and defeating the incumbent by a margin of more than 407,000 votes. President Truman, campaigning for re-election, won the state by a slim 33,600. More than one country has a day called Election Day. ...


United States Senator

As a member of the Senate, Douglas soon earned a reputation as an unconventional liberal, concerned as much with fiscal discipline as with passing the Fair Deal. Although he was a passionate crusader for civil rights (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. described him as "the greatest of all the Senators"), Douglas earned fame as an opponent of pork barrel spending. Early in his first term, he grabbed headlines when, magnifying glass and atlas in hand, he strode to the Senate floor and, referring to a pork barrel project for the dredging of a river in Maine, defied anyone to find the river in the atlas. When Maine's Owen Brewster objected, and pointed out the millions of dollars in pork going to Illinois, Douglas offered to cut his state's share by 40%. In United States history, the Fair Deal was U.S. President Harry S. Trumans policy of social improvement, outlined in his 1949 State of the Union Address to Congress on January 5, 1949. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Martin Luther King redirects here. ... Pork barrel, in a literal sense, is a barrel in which pork is kept, but figuratively is a supply of money; often the source of ones livelihood. ... A magnifying glass A magnifying glass is a single convex lens which is used to produce a magnified image of an object. ... An atlas is a collection of maps, traditionally bound into book form, but also found in multimedia formats. ... Official language(s) None (English de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Owen Brewster Ralph Owen Brewster (February 22, 1888–December 25, 1961) was an American politician from Maine. ...


Appointed to chair the Joint Economic Committee, Douglas led a series of hard-hitting investigations into fiscal mismanagement in government and appeared on the cover of Time. A profile of him in that issue was entitled "The Making of a Maverick." The Joint Economic Committee is one of only four joint committees of the U.S. Congress. ... Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ...


As the 1952 presidential election approached, a groundswell of support arose for a Douglas candidacy for President. The National Editorial Association ranked him the second-most-qualified man, after Truman, to receive the Democratic presidential nomination, and a poll of 46 Democratic insiders revealed him to be a favorite for the nomination if Truman stepped aside. Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


Douglas, however, refused to be considered as a candidate for President, and instead backed the candidacy of Senator Estes Kefauver of Tennessee, a folky, coonskin cap-wearing populist who had become famous for his televised investigations into organized crime. Douglas stumped across the country for Kefauver and stood next to him at the 1952 Democratic National Convention when Kefauver was defeated by Illinois Governor Adlai Stevenson. Four years later, in 1956, he remained publicly neutral, feeling that openly opposing Stevenson's drive for the nomination and supporting Kefauver would damage his standing with his state party. The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... modern coonskin cap Fess Parker portraying Davy Crockett wearing a traditional coonskin cap A Coonskin Cap is quite literally a cap fashioned from the skin and fur of a raccoon. ... Populism is a political philosophy or rhetorical style that holds that the common persons interests are oppressed or hindered by the elite in society, and that the instruments of the state need to be grasped from this self-serving elite and used for the benefit and advancement of the... Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ... The 1952 Democratic National Convention was held in Chicago, Illinois. ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician, noted for intellectual demeanor and advocacy of liberal causes in the Democratic party. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In addition to his battles for equal rights for African Americans and less pork barrel spending, Douglas was also known for his fights for environmental protection, public housing, and truth in lending laws. He opposed real estate redlining, but was forced to allow a 1949 provision in a public housing bill making it possible for suburbs to reject low-income housing. He also authored the Consumer Credit Protection Act, a bill that forced lendors to state the terms of a loan in plain language and restricted the ability of lendors to discriminate on the basis of gender, race, or income. Although the bill was not passed during his term of office, it became law in 1968. An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Environmental movement is a term often used for any social or political movement directed towards the preservation, restoration, or enhancement of the natural environment. ... A local authority tower block in Cwmbrân, South Wales Public housing or project homes is a form of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... Redlining is the practice of denying or increasing the cost of services, such as banking or insurance, to residents of certain areas. ... Housing subdivision near Union, Kentucky, a suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ...


Defeat and retirement

During the 1966 election, Douglas, then 74, ran for a fourth term in office against Republican Charles H. Percy, a wealthy businessman. A confluence of events, including Douglas' age, unhappiness within the Democratic Party over his support for the Vietnam War, and sympathy for Percy over the recent, unsolved murder of his daughter, caused Douglas to lose the election in an upset. 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Charles Harting Percy (born September 27, 1919) was chairman of the Bell & Howell Corporation from 1949 to 1964 and Republican United States Senator for Illinois from 1967 to 1985. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


After losing his seat in the Senate, Douglas taught at the New School, chaired a commission on housing, and wrote books, including an autobiography, In the Fullness of Time. The New School, previously known as New School University, is an institution of higher learning in New York City. ... Cover of An autobiography, from the Greek auton, self, bios, life and graphein, write, is a biography written by the subject or composed conjointly with a collaborative writer (styled as told to or with). The term dates from the late eighteenth century, but the form is much older. ...


In the early 1970s, he suffered a stroke and withdrew from public life. On September 24, 1976, he died at his home. He was cremated and his ashes were scattered in Jackson Park near the University of Chicago. A stroke, also known as cerebrovascular accident (CVA),[1] is an acute neurological injury in which the blood supply to a part of the brain is interrupted. ... September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... The crematorium at Haycombe Cemetery, Bath, England. ... Jackson Park or Jackson Park Highlands is a 500 acre (2 km²) park on Chicagos South Side located in the South Shore community area, bordering Lake Michigan and the neighborhoods of Hyde Park and Woodlawn. ...

Preceded by
Charles W. Brooks
Class 2 U.S. Senator from Illinois
1949–1967
Succeeded by
Charles H. Percy

  Results from FactBites:
 
Paul Douglas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (484 words)
Paul Howard Douglas (March 26, 1892 - September 24, 1976) was a University of Chicago economist and Democratic United States Senator, 1949–1967, representing the State of Illinois.
As a Senator, Douglas was one of the most passionate, though not most effective, crusaders for civil rights, and would occasionally resort to trickery to achieve his goals.
A fateful compromise of Douglas' was his acceptance in 1949 of a provision in a public housing bill making it possible for suburbs to reject low-income housing.
Paul Douglas (actor) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (224 words)
Paul Douglas (April 11, 1907 - September 11, 1959) was an American movie actor born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,
Douglas was cast in the 1959 episode of The Twilight Zone called "The Mighty Casey", a role written for him by Rod Serling, based on his character in Angels in the Outfield, but Douglas died the same week the episode was to be filmed.
Paul Douglas died on September 11, 1959 of a heart attack in Hollywood, California at the age of 52.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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