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Encyclopedia > Paul Creston

Paul Creston (born Giuseppe Guttoveggio October 10, 1906 in New York City – died August 24, 1985 in San Diego, California) was an American composer of classical music. October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years). ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC, City That Never Sleeps, The Concrete Jungle, The City So Nice They Named It Twice Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1676 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area... August 24 is the 236th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (237th in leap years), with 129 days remaining. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Americas Finest City Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates: Country United States State California County San Diego Founded July 16, 1769 Incorporated March 27, 1850 Government  - Mayor Jerry Sanders  - City Attorney Michael Aguirre  - City Council Scott Peters Kevin Faulconer Toni Atkins Tony Young Brian Maienschein... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ...


Born in New York City, Creston was self‐taught as a composer. His work tends to be fairly conservative in style, firmly tonal (as opposed to atonal) in style, and with a strong rhythmic element. His pieces include six symphonies, a number of concerti, including two for violin, one for marimba, one for two pianos, one for accordion and one for alto saxophone, a fantasia for trombone and orchestra (composed for and premiered by Robert Marsteller), and a Rhapsody (rapsodie) again for alto saxophone - written for famous virtuoso Jean-Marie Londeix. He has also wrote Sonate for alto saxophone (dedicated to Cecil Leeson). Several of his works were inspired by the poetry of Walt Whitman. Creston was the most performed American composer of the 1940s. Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC, City That Never Sleeps, The Concrete Jungle, The City So Nice They Named It Twice Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1676 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area... Tonality is a system of writing music according to certain hierarchical pitch relationships around a key center or tonic. ... Atonality in a general sense describes music that departs from the system of tonal hierarchies that are said to characterized the sound of classical European music from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries. ... For the popular Tamil film, see Rhythm (film) Rhythm (Greek = flow, or in Modern Greek, style) is the variation of the length and accentuation of a series of sounds or other events. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The term concerto (plural is concerti or concertos) usually refers to a musical work in which one solo instrument is accompanied by an orchestra. ... The violin is a bowed string instrument with four strings tuned in perfect fifths. ... The marimba is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... This article is about the instrument as a whole. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family, usually made of brass and played with a single-reed mouthpiece like the clarinet. ... The trombone is a musical instrument in the brass family. ... Robert Marsteller (1919-1975). ... A rhapsody in music is a one-movement work that is episodic yet integrated, free-flowing in structure, featuring a range of highly contrasted moods, color and tonality. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family, usually made of brass and played with a single-reed mouthpiece like the clarinet. ... Jean-Marie Londeix (September 20, 1932) is a French saxophonist born in Libourne who studied saxophone, piano, harmony and chamber music. ... Cecil Leeson, (1902-1989) a musician and teacher was widely credited with establishing the saxophone as a legitimate concert instrument. ... Walt Whitman Walter Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist, journalist, and humanist. ...


Creston was also a notable teacher, with the composers John Corigliano and Charles Roland Berry, and the jazz musicians Rusty Dedrick and Charlie Queener among his pupils. He wrote the theoretical books Principles of Rhythm (1964) and Rational Metric Notation (1979). John Corigliano (born February 16, 1938) is an American composer of classical music. ... Charles Roland Berry was born 1957 in Boston, Massachusetts. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Paul Creston Biography - famous Paul Creston Classical collection and Paul Creston Music Reviews. (864 words)
Paul Creston was born Giuseppe Guttoveggio in New York City in 1906.
Creston’s first employment as a musician occurred from 1926 through 1929, when he was worked as a theater organist for silent movies.
Creston earned several awards for his work in radio and television, including the Christopher Award for his score for Revolt in Hungary 1958 and an Emmy citation from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for his score to the documentary In the American Grain (1964).
Paul Creston (158 words)
Born in New York City, Creston was self-taught as a composer.
His work tends to be fairly conservative in style, firmly tonal (as opposed to atonal) in style, and with a strong rhythmic element.
Creston was also a notable teacher, with the composer John Corigliano and the jazz musicians Rusty Dedrick and Charlie Queener among his pupils.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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