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Encyclopedia > Paul Brown
Paul Brown
Date of birth September 7, 1908
Place of birth Norwalk, OH
Date of death August 5, 1991
Position(s) Head Coach
College Miami (Ohio)
Career Highlights
Awards 1949 Sporting News NFL COY
1951 Sporting News NFL COY
1953 Sporting News NFL COY
1957 UPI NFL COY
1969 UPI NFL COY
1970 UPI NFL COY
Honors Paul Brown Stadium
Career Record 170-108-6
Championships
      Won
1946 AAFC Championship
1947 AAFC Championship
1948 AAFC Championship
1949 AAFC Championship
1950 NFL Championship
1954 NFL Championship
1955 NFL Championship
Stats
Coaching Stats DatabaseFootball
Team(s) as a coach/administrator
1946-1962
1968-1975
Cleveland Browns
Cincinnati Bengals
Pro Football Hall of Fame, 1967

Paul Eugene Brown (September 7, 1908 - August 5, 1991) was an athletics coach of American football and a major figure in the development of the National Football League. A seminal figure in football history, Brown is considered the "father of the modern offense," with many claiming that he ranks as one of if not the greatest of football coaches in history. Such claims are backed by significant evidence: Brown dominated as a gridiron general on every major level -- high school, college, and professional. Image File history File links Hist_paul_brown. ... September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Norwalk is a city located in Huron County, Ohio. ... August 5 is the 217th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (218th in leap years), with 148 days remaining. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In American football, each team has 11 players on the field at one time. ... The head coach in sports coaching is the coach who is in charge of the other coaches. ... This is a list of athletic conferences of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). ... Miami University, founded in 1809, is the second-oldest public university west of the Allegheny Mountains and seventh-oldest public university in the United States. ... The NFL Coach of the Year Award is presented annually by the Associated Press to the NFL coach who has done the most outstanding job of working with the talent he has at his disposal. ... The NFL Coach of the Year Award is presented annually by the Associated Press to the NFL coach who has done the most outstanding job of working with the talent he has at his disposal. ... The NFL Coach of the Year Award is presented annually by the Associated Press to the NFL coach who has done the most outstanding job of working with the talent he has at his disposal. ... The NFL Coach of the Year Award is presented annually by the Associated Press to the NFL coach who has done the most outstanding job of working with the talent he has at his disposal. ... The NFL Coach of the Year Award is presented annually by the Associated Press to the NFL coach who has done the most outstanding job of working with the talent he has at his disposal. ... The NFL Coach of the Year Award is presented annually by the Associated Press to the NFL coach who has done the most outstanding job of working with the talent he has at his disposal. ... Paul Brown Stadium is an football stadium located in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... The All-America Football Conference (AAFC) was a professional American football league that challenged the rival National Football League from 1946 to 1949. ... The All-America Football Conference (AAFC) was a professional American football league that challenged the rival National Football League from 1946 to 1949. ... The All-America Football Conference (AAFC) was a professional American football league that challenged the rival National Football League from 1946 to 1949. ... The All-America Football Conference (AAFC) was a professional American football league that challenged the rival National Football League from 1946 to 1949. ... The National Football League has used several different formats to determine their league champions since its founding in 1920. ... The National Football League has used several different formats to determine their league champions since its founding in 1920. ... The National Football League has used several different formats to determine their league champions since its founding in 1920. ... For historical information about the Cleveland Blowns (including all-time records, Hall of Famers, notable players and coaching history, see Cleveland Browns Archives Browns redirects here. ... City Cincinnati, Ohio Team colors Black, Orange and White Head Coach Marvin Lewis Owner Mike Brown Mascot Who Dey League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1968-1969) Western Division (1968-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC Central (1970-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the National Football Leagues Hall of Fame. ... See also: 1966 in sports, other events of 1967, 1968 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing Stock car racing: Mario Andretti wins the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship — Richard Petty May 31-Indianapolis 500 — A.J. Foyt USAC Racing — A.J. Foyt won the season championship... September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... August 5 is the 217th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (218th in leap years), with 148 days remaining. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In sports, a coach is an individual involved in the direction and instruction of the on-field operations of an athletic team or of individual athletes. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... For other uses of National Football League, see National Football League (disambiguation). ...


Born in Norwalk, Ohio, Brown's family moved to Massillon when he was nine. His father Lester, a dispatcher for the Wheeling and Lake Erie Railroad, was described as "very meticulous, serious-minded and highly-disciplined," all of which characterized Brown's later approach to coaching. Brown graduated from Washington High School in Massillon, Ohio in 1925, having played varsity quarterback in the wake of Harry Stuhldreher (one of the University of Notre Dame's legendary Four Horsemen). [1] Norwalk is a city in Huron County, Ohio, United States. ... The Wheeling and Lake Erie Railway (WLE)s oldest predecessor rail line began in Ohio, with the organization of the Carroll County Rail Road on March 9, 1850. ... Massillon Washington High School, is a secondary school located in Massillon, Ohio (2005 enrollment unconfirmed). ... Massillon is a city located in Stark County, Ohio. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Harry Augustus Stuhldreher (October 14, 1901—January 26, 1965) was a three-time All-America quarterback and member of the legendary Four Horsemen of Notre Dame football backfield of the 1920s. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Roman Catholic institution located in Notre Dame, Indiana, immediately northeast of South Bend, Indiana, United States. ... The Four Horsemen of Notre Dame comprised a winning group of football players at the University of Notre Dame under coach Knute Rockne. ...

Contents

High school and college coaching career

Enrolling at Ohio State University as a freshman quarterback, Brown found his 145-pound frame would not stand the rigors of major college football, and transferred to Miami University in Ohio, losing a year of eligibility in the process. Under Coach Chester Pittser, Brown played two years and was named to the All-Ohio small college second team by the AP at the end of the 1928 season.[2] In 1930, he graduated from Miami with a B.A. in Education. He would complete his academic career in 1940 when he received an M.A. in Education from The Ohio State University. The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the U.S. state of Ohio. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... Miami University, founded in 1809, is the second-oldest public university west of the Allegheny Mountains and seventh-oldest public university in the United States. ... Chester M. Pittser was an American football, basketball and baseball coach at the college level. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...


As his academic credentials indicate, Brown was as much a teacher as he was a coach. He qualified for a Rhodes Scholarship in 1930, but he had married Katie Kester, his "high school sweetheart", in 1929 and with the coming of the Great Depression, he needed employment. His coaching career began in 1930 when he was hired as a teacher/coach at Severn School, in Severna Park, Maryland, at the time a Naval Academy preparatory. Superscript text Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... Bold text // Link titleSmall TextSubscript textSubscript textSuperscript textStrike-through textSEX The Great Depression was a worldwide economic downturn which started in October of 1929 and lasted through most of the 1930s. ... Severn School was founded in 1914 by Rolland M. Teel in Severna Park, Maryland, as a preparatory school for the United States Naval Academy. ... Severna Park is a census-designated place (CDP) in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, United States. ... Teamwork: Fourth Class Midshipmen lock arms and use ropes made from uniform items as they brace themselves climbing the Herndon Monument The United States Naval Academy, or USNA, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. ... Preparatory school or prep school may refer to: University-preparatory school, in North America, is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ...


Washington High School Tigers

Tasting success with a 16-1-1 mark in two seasons at Severn, Brown gave up a brief attempt at law school in 1932 to become at age 23 the head football coach of his hometown Massillon Washington High School Tigers. In his nine years at Massillon Brown posted an 80-8-2 record which included a 35-game winning streak. After his first three years, he had improved the fortunes of the Tigers, but still had been unable to defeat the team's bitter rival, Canton McKinley High School, losing all three meetings by at least fifteen points per game.[3] Massillon Washington High School, is a secondary school located in Massillon, Ohio (2005 enrollment unconfirmed). ... Binomial name Panthera tigris altaica (Linnaeus, 1758) Distribution of tigers in 1900 (red) and 1990 (green) Synonyms Felis tigris Linnaeus, 1758 Tigris striatus Severtzov, 1858 Tigris regalis pink, 1867 Tigers (Panthera tigris) are mammals of the Felidae family and one of four big cats in the Panthera genus. ... Canton McKinley Senior High School is a public high school in Canton, Stark County, Ohio, U.S.. It is one of the largest and oldest high schools in Ohio. ...


Brown not only ended that frustrating losing streak, but also won the next six games with McKinley, and an overall total of 58 of the next 60 contests, tying one, and gaining six straight Ohio state high school football championships (1935 through 1940) for Massillon. The Tigers outscored their opposition 2,393 to 168 during those six years. The 1940 team outscored its opponents 477 to 6, with the lone score against them made by Canton McKinley. During this period, Brown's achievements also helped build a new stadium for the high school that seated 20,000 people, and drew crowds that surpassed every football program in Ohio except The Ohio State University.[4] The Ohio High School Athletic Association (OHSAA) is the governing body of athletics programs for junior and senior high schools in the State of Ohio, an unincorporated non-profit organization founded in 1907. ...


Brown had achieved this success by implementing a system at Massillon based on techniques developed by Dr. John B. "Jock" Sutherland, head coach at the University of Pittsburgh. Sutherland had played professional football for the pioneer Massillon Tigers club when Brown was a boy and had gone on to success as a coach. Brown planned every phase of his program, detailing practice schedules, assigning assistant coaches (which he dubbed "position coaches") specific duties, and installing his entire system in Massillon's junior high schools so that players would already know his system when they reached high school. Dr. John B. Jock Sutherland Born on March 11, 1889, at Coupar Angus, Scotland. ... The University of Pittsburgh is a state-related, doctoral/research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... For other uses of National Football League, see National Football League (disambiguation). ...


Ohio State Buckeyes

With avid support from influential groups including the Ohio High School Football Coaches Association and future Purdue University head coach Jack Mollenkopf of Toledo Waite High School, Brown moved into the college ranks by becoming head coach of the Ohio State Buckeyes on January 14, 1941. Under Brown, the Buckeyes went 18-8-1 (1941-43). Brown's players were known for speed, intelligence, and contact; his teams for execution and fundamentals; and he was dubbed "Precision Paul"[5] at Ohio State. Boilermakers is the official moniker for the intercollegiate athletic teams of Purdue University. ... Nickname: The Glass City Location in the state of Ohio Country United States State Ohio County Lucas Mayor Carty Finkbeiner (D) Area    - City 217. ... Head Coach Jim Tressel 6th Year, 62-14 Home Stadium Ohio Stadium Capacity 101,568 - Grass Conference Big Ten First Year 1889 Athletic Director Gene Smith Website OhioStateBuckeyes. ... January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ...


In his first season at Ohio State Brown went 6-1-1, losing to Northwestern University and their running back Otto Graham, and tying Michigan. The Buckeyes tied for second place in the Western Conference, finished 13th in the AP poll, and Brown was voted fourth place on balloting for National Coach of the Year behind Frank Leahy, Bernie Bierman, and Earl Blaik. The Northwestern Wildcats are the athletic teams that represent Northwestern University, a founding member of the Big Ten Conference, and the only private university member. ... Otto Everett Graham Jr. ... The University of Michigan features 24 varsity sports teams called the Wolverines, who compete in the NCAAs Division I and in the Big Ten Conference in all sports except mens ice hockey which competes in the NCAA D1 Central Collegiate Hockey Association. ... Big Ten redirects here. ... Frank Leahy Francis William Leahy (1907–1973) was an American collegiate football coach, who earned the nickname The Master. He was born in ONeill, Nebraska. ... Bernie Bierman ( March 11, 1894 to March 7, 1977) best remember as a college football coach . ... Earl Henry Red Blaik (February 15, 1897 - May 6, 1989) was a U.S. football coach. ...


The following year, despite losing 18 lettermen to graduation and to military service in World War II, Brown led the Buckeyes to the university's first National championship, using a team of 3 seniors, 16 juniors, and 24 sophomores. Among his players were senior Les Horvath and four former Massillon players, two of whom (Lin Houston and Tommy James) would play for the Cleveland Browns. The only loss in 1942 was on the road to Wisconsin in a game that came to be known as the "Bad-Water Game," because most of the team came down with dysentery from unsanitary water during their travel to Madison by railroad. A letterman, in U.S. sports, is a high school or college athlete who has met a specified level of participation on a varsity athletic team. ... Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000,000 Total dead: 50,000,000 Military dead: 8,000,000 Civilian dead: 4,000,000 Total dead 12,000,000 World War II (abbreviated WWII), or the Second World War, was a worldwide conflict... UTs Bevo with the BCS Division I-A National Championship trophy in an ESPN College GameDay broadcast. ... Look up senior in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up junior in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Les Horvath (born October 12, 1921; died November 14, 1995) was the 1944 Heisman Trophy winner, who played quarterback and halfback for The Ohio State University. ... Wisconsin Badger Logo The Wisconsin Badgers are a variety of collegiate athletic teams from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... Dysentery is an illness (formerly known as the bloody flux or simply flux) involving severe diarrhea that is often associated with blood in the feces. ... Nickname: Mad Town or Mad City Location of Madison in Dane County, Wisconsin Municipality City Incorporated 1848 Mayor Dave Cieslewicz Area    - City 136. ...


Brown had recruited what was reputedly the finest freshman team in Ohio history in 1942 but lost virtually all of them to military service. In 1943 Ohio State was handicapped when the school affiliated itself with the U.S. Army's ASTP officer training, which did not allow its trainees to participate in varsity sports, while schools such as Michigan and Purdue became part of the Navy's V-12 program, which did. Although the Big Ten promulgated a special wartime exemption in 1943 allowing freshmen to play varsity football, Ohio State found itself in competition against older and larger teams (both military and college) featuring players such as Elroy Hirsch. The 1943 "Baby Bucks" had only five returning players and one starter from the national champion team, six from the 1942 freshman team, and 33 17-year-old freshmen, going 3-6. The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... The Army Specialized Training Program was a military training program instituted by the U.S. Army during World War II at a number of American universities to meet wartime demands for junior officers and soldiers with technical skills. ... The V-12 Navy College Training Program was designed to supplement the force of commissioned officers in the United States Navy during World War II. Between July 1, 1943 and June 30, 1946, over 125,000 men were enrolled in the V-12 program in 131 colleges and universities in... Elroy Hirsch (June 17, 1923 - January 28, 2004) was an American football running back and receiver for the Los Angeles Rams and Chicago Rockets, nicknamed Crazy Legs for his unusual running style. ...


After Brown was re-classified 1-A in February 1944, he was commissioned April 12, 1944, as a lieutenant (junior grade) in the United States Navy.[6] He served at the Great Lakes Naval Station as head coach of its Bluejacket football team, which competed against other service teams and college programs, putting together a mark of 15-5-2 during the final two years of World War II. One of those five losses was to Ohio State on October 9, 1944.[7] 1-A may refer to: Class 1-A, a classification of the Selective Service System Adcox 1-A, a biplane built in Portland, USA in 1929 Category: ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... A Lieutenant, Junior Grade, is a division officer in the United States Navy. ... USN redirects here. ... Naval Station Great Lakes is the United States Navys Headquarters Command for training issues, located in North Chicago, Illinois. ... Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000,000 Total dead: 50,000,000 Military dead: 8,000,000 Civilian dead: 4,000,000 Total dead 12,000,000 World War II (abbreviated WWII), or the Second World War, was a worldwide conflict... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


After the war, despite still being Ohio State's head coach in absentia, Brown chose instead to become the first head coach for Arthur 'Mickey' McBride's new All-America Football Conference franchise, the Cleveland Browns, signing his contract February 8, 1945, while still in the Navy.[8] Such was his popularity that the team was named in his honor following a poll taken in the Cleveland Plain Dealer. For in absentia medical care, see Health care delivery. ... Arthur McBride is an Irish folk song. ... The All-America Football Conference (AAFC) was a professional American football league that challenged the rival National Football League from 1946 to 1949. ... For historical information about the Cleveland Blowns (including all-time records, Hall of Famers, notable players and coaching history, see Cleveland Browns Archives Browns redirects here. ... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... The Plain Dealer is the major daily newspaper of Cleveland, Ohio. ...


Until 1951 Brown retained an interest in coaching the Buckeyes. Despite his success as a professional head coach, he let it be known following the resignation of Wes Fesler that he would entertain an offer to return to Ohio State, and he received an immediate show of strong support from many of the same organizations and people who had supported him in 1940. However Brown had also alienated many of his supporters within the Buckeye alumni ranks for failing to return to the coaching position reserved for him at the end of World War II, and the athletics department by signing Buckeye players, Lou Groza chief among them, to professional contracts before their college eligibility had ended. Although he interviewed with the university's athletic board on January 27, 1951, with tumultuous campus support, the board unanimously rejected Brown in favor of Woody Hayes, who was unanimously endorsed by the board of trustees.[9] Wesley Eugene Wes Fesler (June 29, 1908 - July 30, 1989) was a three-sport athlete at the Ohio State University, including three consecutive years as a consensus first-team All-America selection in American football. ... Louis Roy Groza (born January 25, 1924 - died November 29, 2000) was born in Martins Ferry, Ohio. ... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Wayne Woodrow “Woody” Hayes (February 14, 1913 – March 12, 1987) was a college football coach who is best remembered for his 28-year tenure at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, from 1951-1978. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Board of directors. ...


Professional leagues

Cleveland Browns

While the AAFC lasted only four seasons, the Browns served as the gold standard for the league, winning the championship each year and outdrawing the Cleveland's NFL franchise, the Rams, who had left town for Los Angeles after winning the NFL championship in 1945. Nickname: The Forest City Motto: Progress and Prosperity Location in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA Coordinates: Country United States State Ohio County Cuyahoga Founded 1796 Incorporated 1836 Mayor Frank G. Jackson (D) Area    - City 82. ... ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... The National Football League has used several different formats to determine their league champions since its founding in 1920. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ...


Brown had put together a talented team, primarily by combining players from Massillon, Ohio State and Great Lakes. One key move came when he shifted Otto Graham to quarterback, providing the team with a signal caller who would lead the team to the league title game in each of his 10 seasons. In addition, Brown ignored the gentlemen's agreement that barred African-American players from the league, adding future Pro Football Hall of Famers Marion Motley and Bill Willis. Otto Everett Graham Jr. ... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... A Gentlemens agreement is an informal agreement between two parties. ... An African American (also Afro-American or Black American) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the National Football Leagues Hall of Fame. ... Marion Motley (born June 5, 1920, in Leesburg, Georgia, died June 27, 1999) was a former American Football fullback who played for the Cleveland Browns and the Pittsburgh Steelers. ... William Karnet Willis (born October 5, 1921 in Columbus, Ohio) is a former professional football defensive lineman who played for the Cleveland Browns from 1946 to 1953. ...


Following the merger between the NFL and AAFC, The Browns, along with the San Francisco 49ers and the first Baltimore Colts franchise, moved to the NFL in 1950 and didn't miss a beat, winning the NFL Championship in their first year. Critics had predicted that the overall weakness of the AAFC would expose the Browns, but the team defeated the Rams in the title game on December 24 on a last-minute field goal by Lou Groza. The Browns went on to appear in the next five title games, winning back-to-back titles in 1954 and 1955. City San Francisco, California Other nicknames Niners, The Red And Gold, Bay Bombers Team colors Cardinal red, metallic gold and black Head Coach Mike Nolan Owner Denise DeBartolo York and John York General manager none Mascot Sourdough Sam League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division (1946... Baltimore Colts started in the All-America Football Conference in 1946 as the Miami Seahawks. ... The National Football League has used several different formats to determine their league champions since its founding in 1920. ... December 24 is the 358th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (359th in leap years). ... Louis Roy Groza (born January 25, 1924 - died November 29, 2000) was born in Martins Ferry, Ohio. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Brown gained a reputation as an innovator during his time in Cleveland. He was the first to use intelligence tests to judge players, establish a film library, and install face masks on helmets. Another innovation was the use of "messenger guards" to relay plays from the sidelines, and he even experimented with helmet radios, decades before they became part of the game. The offense directed by Graham was the predecessor of the offense made famous by Bill Walsh, a protege of Brown. Group of men drilling in American football helmets A football helmet is a protective device used primarily in American football and Canadian football. ... Bill Walsh (born November 30, 1931) is a former American football head coach of the San Francisco 49ers and Stanford University. ...


He was also a person known for his stubborn approach to criticism. After the Browns had soundly defeated the Philadelphia Eagles in the opening game of the 1950 NFL season, Eagles head coach Greasy Neale dismissed the Browns by saying, "All they do is pass the ball." In the team's subsequent meeting a few months later, the Browns set an NFL record that still stands by attempting no passes in their win over the Eagles. City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Team colors Midnight Green, Black, White, and Silver Head Coach Andy Reid Owner Jeffrey Lurie General manager Tom Heckert Fight song Fly, Eagles Fly Mascot Swoop League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1933–present) Eastern Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern Conference (1953-1969) Capitol... The 1950 NFL season was the 31st regular season of the National Football League. ... Earle Greasy Neale was inducted into the Pro-Football Hall of Fame in 1969. ...


Fired

Brown was fired as coach on January 9, 1963 by majority owner, Art Modell, who had purchased the club in 1961 and looked to take more control over the team. Controversy developed over the timing of the decision, coming in the midst of a local newspaper strike that limited discussion of the move. One comment from a local journalist later noted the move was akin to the toppling of the Terminal Tower, then Cleveland's tallest building. January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... Arthur B. Modell (born June 23, 1925, Brooklyn, New York) was a National Football League team owner with the Cleveland Browns from 1961-1995 and the Baltimore Ravens from 1996-2004. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... Tower City Center (also known Terminal Tower) is a landmark skyscraper located in Cleveland, Ohio. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


The relationship, which had never been warm, had continued to deteriorate because of what Brown felt was Modell's infringing on his duties. Having little contact with Modell, Brown privately made a huge trade with the Washington Redskins in December 1961 without the owner's knowledge. Brown's deal secured Heisman Trophy winner Ernie Davis, the star running back from Syracuse University. However, the trade marked the beginning of the end of his Cleveland career and turned tragic when Davis developed leukemia during his first training camp in 1962. The feud itself was exacerbated when Brown chose not to play Davis, despite assurances from doctor that Davis could withstand the physical demands of NFL action. Modell saw no harm in playing Davis, with his financial investment obviously a consideration in his thinking. Davis would never play in a professional game, dying of the disease on May 18, 1963. City Landover, Maryland Other nicknames The Skins Team colors Burgundy and Gold Head Coach Joe Gibbs Owner Dan Snyder Fight song Hail to the Redskins League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1932–present) Eastern Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern Conference (1953-1969) Capitol Division (1967-1969) National... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... John Cappellettis 1973 Heisman Trophy is part of an exhibit at the Penn State All-Sports Museum located at Beaver Stadium, on the campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ... Ernie Davis (December 13, 1939 - May 18, 1963) was an American Football player who became the first African-American to win the Heisman Trophy. ... Syracuse University (SU) is a private research university located in Syracuse, New York. ... Leukemia or leukaemia (see spelling differences) is a cancer of the blood or bone marrow and is characterized by an abnormal proliferation (production by multiplication) of blood cells, usually white blood cells (leukocytes). ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ...


In exile after more than 30 years of coaching, Brown spent the next five years away from the sidelines, never once attending a Browns contest. While he was secure financially, earning $80,000 annually for the final five years of his contract as well as owning approximately six percent of the team, Brown's frustration grew with each passing year, later recalling, "It was terrible. I had everything a man could want: leisure, enough money, a wonderful family. Yet with all that, I was eating my heart out."


Just months after his dismissal, he was rumored to be part of an ownership group to buy the Philadelphia Eagles, but no deal was ever officially signed. Then, in May 1966, Brown traveled with Ohio governor James A. Rhodes to make a presentation on behalf of Cincinnati for an American Football League franchise. 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... A governor or governour (archaic) is a governing official, usually the executive (at least nominally, to different degrees also politically and administratively) of a non-sovereign level of government, ranking under the Head of state; furthermore the title applies to officials with a similar mandate as representatives of a chartered... James Allen Rhodes (September 13, 1909 - March 4, 2001) was a Republican politician from Ohio, and as of 2004 one of only three U.S. state governors to be elected to four terms in office. ... Cincinnati, Ohio viewed from the SW, across the Ohio River from Kentucky. ... AFL logo The American Football League (AFL) was a professional league of American football that operated from 1960 to 1969. ...


Cincinnati Bengals

On September 26, 1967, Brown officially returned to football as part-owner of the Cincinnati Bengals of the NFL's rival American Football League. The team would join the NFL with the NFL-AFL merger in 1970. He would coach the team for eight seasons, leading the team to three playoff berths, including one in the team's third year of operation in 1970. In each of those seasons, as well as a number of preseason clashes, Browns' Bengals took on his former Browns team, reigniting the bitter rivalry between Brown and Modell. September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... City Cincinnati, Ohio Team colors Black, Orange and White Head Coach Marvin Lewis Owner Mike Brown Mascot Who Dey League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1968-1969) Western Division (1968-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC Central (1970-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team... AFL logo The American Football League (AFL) was a professional league of American football that operated from 1960 to 1969. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ...


Retirement

After retiring on January 1, 1976, he began a 15-year tenure as team president, with the Bengals making two trips to the Super Bowl, losing both games to the San Francisco 49ers. Following his death in 1991 of complications from pneumonia, he was succeeded by his son Mike. January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... City San Francisco, California Other nicknames Niners, The Red And Gold, Bay Bombers Team colors Cardinal red, metallic gold and black Head Coach Mike Nolan Owner Denise DeBartolo York and John York General manager none Mascot Sourdough Sam League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division (1946... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mike Brown is the son of former Cleveland Browns, Ohio State and Cincinnati Bengals coach, Paul Brown. ...


Former San Francisco 49ers head coach, Bill Walsh, who was a Cincinnati Bengals assistant for seven seasons under Brown, was passed over in favor of Bill "Tiger" Johnson when Brown retired in 1975. In a 2006 interview[10] , Walsh claimed that during his tenure with the Bengals, Brown "worked against my candidacy" to be a head coach anywhere in the league. "All the way through I had opportunities, and I never knew about them," Walsh said. "And then when I left him, he called whoever he thought was necessary to keep me out of the NFL."


Honors

Brown was honored in 1967 by his election to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio. In addition to that accolade, two stadiums bear his name: Paul Brown Tiger Stadium in Massillon, and Paul Brown Stadium, current home of the Bengals. One could also say that a third stadium is named after Coach Brown: the "Cleveland Browns Stadium." 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the National Football Leagues Hall of Fame. ... Website: http://www. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Paul Brown Tiger Stadium is a stadium in Massillon, Ohio. ... Paul Brown Stadium is an football stadium located in Cincinnati, Ohio. ...


Brown's first wife, Kathryn "Katie" Brown, died in 1969 and in 1973 he married his former secretary, Mary Rightsell. He died in Cincinnati on August 5, 1991, and is buried in Rose Hill Cemetery[11] in Massillon, Ohio. Massillon is a city located in Stark County, Ohio. ...


Legacy/Coaching Family Tree

The following coaches either coached under or played for Paul Brown and were influenced at least to some degree by him and his football knowledge and offensive system:

Donald Francis Shula (born January 4, 1930 in Grand River, Ohio) is a former professional football coach for the National Football League. ... Charles Henry Chuck Noll (born January 5, 1932) is a former American football coach, having served as the coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers in the National Football League from 1969 to 1991. ... Wilbur Weeb Ewbank (May 6, 1907 - November 17, 1998) was an American professional football coach. ... Sid Gillman (October 26, 1911 - January 3, 2003) was an American football coach and innovator. ... The name Bill Walsh may refer to the following people: Bill Walsh, an American football Hall_of_Famer. ... Blanton Long Collier (born July 2, 1906, Millersburg, Kentucky; died March 22, 1983, Houston, Texas) was an American football coach who led the University of Kentucky (1954-1961) and Cleveland Browns (1963-1970). ...

See also

The following is a list of players that played for the 1960-1969 American Football League. ...

References

  1. ^ Jack Park (2002). “Paul Brown: The Organization Man (1941-1943)”, The Official Ohio State Football Encyclopedia. Sports Publishing LLC, 182. ISBN 1-58261-006-1. 
  2. ^ Park, op.cit. p.182
  3. ^ Park, op.cit. p.183
  4. ^ Park, op.cit. p.183
  5. ^ Park, op.cit. p.182
  6. ^ Park, op.cit. p.218
  7. ^ Park, op.cit. p.222
  8. ^ Park, op.cit. p.228
  9. ^ Robert Vare (1974). Buckeye: A Study of Coach Woody Hayes and the Ohio State Football Machine. Harper's Magazine Press, 73-76. ISBN 0-06-129150-1. 
  10. ^ Sam Farmer (Dec 22, 2006, D.1). Living Legend. Los Angeles Times. 
  11. ^ Famous Ohio Gravesites. Ohio Living and Travel Magazine. Retrieved on December 20, 2006.

December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

External link

Preceded by
Francis A. Schmidt
Ohio State Head Football Coaches
1941-1943
Succeeded by
Carroll C. Widdoes
Preceded by
First coach
Cleveland Browns Head Coaches
1946–1962
Succeeded by
Blanton Collier
Preceded by
First Coach
Cincinnati Bengals Head Coaches
1968–1975
Succeeded by
Bill Johnson
Preceded by
First Owner
Cincinnati Bengals Owners
1968–1991
Succeeded by
Mike Brown

  Results from FactBites:
 
Paul Brown - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2356 words)
Paul Eugene Brown (September 7, 1908 - August 5, 1991) was an athletics coach of American football and a major figure in the development of the National Football League.
Brown was fired as coach on January 9, 1963 by majority owner, Art Modell, who had purchased the club in 1961 and looked to take more control over the team.
Brown was honored in 1967 by his election to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio.
HickokSports.com - Biography - Paul Brown (468 words)
Brown basically used a "pass and trap" offense during those seasons, using the passing of Otto Graham to set up draw plays for fullback Marion Motley and, later, Fred "Curly" Morrison.
A year after he was inducted into the hall of fame, he became coach and general manager of the Cincinnati Bengals, an expansion team in the American Football League, which merged into the NFL in 1970.
After retiring as a coach, Brown continued to work for the Bengals as general manager and then as a consultant until shortly before his death.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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