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Encyclopedia > Patton (film)
Patton

Patton film poster
Directed by Franklin J. Schaffner
Produced by Frank Caffey
Frank McCarthy
Written by Novel (Patton: Ordeal and Triumph):
Ladislas Farago
Novel (A Soldier's Story):
Omar N. Bradley
Screenplay:
Francis Ford Coppola
Edmund H. North
Starring George C. Scott
Karl Malden
Michael Bates
Karl Michael Vogler
Music by Jerry Goldsmith
Cinematography Fred J. Koenekamp
Editing by Hugh S. Fowler
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date(s) Flag of the United States February 4, 1970
Running time 170 min
Country Flag of the United States United States
Language English
Budget $12,000,000
Gross revenue $61,749,765[1]
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Patton (UK: Patton: Lust for Glory) is a 1970 epic biographical film which tells the story of General George S. Patton during World War II. It stars George C. Scott, Karl Malden, Michael Bates, and Karl Michael Vogler. It was directed by Franklin J. Schaffner, and written by Francis Ford Coppola and Edmund H. North. It won seven Academy Awards, including the Academy Award for Best Picture. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Franklin James Schaffner (May 30, 1920 - July 2, 1989) was an American film director. ... Frank McCarthy (1912 - 1986) graduated from the Virginia Military Institute, Class of 1933. ... Ladislas Farago was a journalist who published a number of popular books on history and espionage, especially concerning the World War II era. ... The worst thing you can do in this part of the country is pay too much attention to the death of a Negro under mysterious circumstances. ... Omar Nelson Bradley (February 12, 1893 - April 8, 1981) was one of the main US Army field commanders in North Africa and Europe during World War II. Bradley was born to a poor family near Clark, Missouri, the son of a schoolteacher. ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... George Campbell Scott (October 18, 1927 - September 22, 1999) was a stage and film actor, director, and producer. ... Karl Malden (born on March 22, 1912) is an Emmy Award-winning, Oscar-winning and Golden Globe-nominated American actor, known for his expansive manner. ... Michael Bates (December 4, 1920 – January 11, 1978) was a British actor born in Jhansi, British India (now in Uttar Pradesh). ... Karl Michael Vogler as Field Marshal Erwin Rommel in Patton (1970) Karl Michael Vogler (born August 28, 1928, in Remscheid, Germany) is a German actor perhaps best-known for his appearance as Erwin Rommel in the George C. Scott film Patton. ... Jerrald King Goldsmith (February 10, 1929 – July 21, 2004) was a famous American film score composer from Los Angeles, California. ... Fred J. Koenekamp (born November 11, 1922) is a U.S. cinematographer. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events February 11 - The film The Magic Christian, starring Peter Sellers and Ringo Starr premieres in New York City. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... USD redirects here. ... USD redirects here. ... // Events February 11 - The film The Magic Christian, starring Peter Sellers and Ringo Starr premieres in New York City. ... The epic film is a film genre typically featuring expensive production values, an emotionally moving music soundtrack, and dramatic themes. ... Poster for Man on the Moon (1999), a biopic A biographical picture— often shortened to biopic— is a film that dramatizes the life of an actual person or people. ... George Patton redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... George Campbell Scott (October 18, 1927 - September 22, 1999) was a stage and film actor, director, and producer. ... Karl Malden (born on March 22, 1912) is an Emmy Award-winning, Oscar-winning and Golden Globe-nominated American actor, known for his expansive manner. ... Michael Bates (December 4, 1920 – January 11, 1978) was a British actor born in Jhansi, British India (now in Uttar Pradesh). ... Karl Michael Vogler as Field Marshal Erwin Rommel in Patton (1970) Karl Michael Vogler (born August 28, 1928, in Remscheid, Germany) is a German actor perhaps best-known for his appearance as Erwin Rommel in the George C. Scott film Patton. ... Franklin James Schaffner (May 30, 1920 - July 2, 1989) was an American film director. ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... // The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Academy Awards, awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which are voted on by others within the industry. ...


The opening monologue, delivered by Scott with an enormous American flag behind him, remains an iconic and often quoted image in film. Despite the rise of the Vietnam protest movement and a decline in interest in World War II movies, the film became a success and an American classic. George C. Scott delivering the speech in Patton. ...


In 2003 the United States Library of Congress deemed the film "culturally significant" and selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry. Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...

Contents

Plot

The film documents the story of General George S. Patton (George C. Scott) during World War II, beginning with his taking charge of demoralized American forces in North Africa after the disastrous Battle of the Kasserine Pass. He participates in the invasion of Sicily and races against the equally egotistical British General Bernard Law Montgomery to capture the Sicilian port of Messina. After he beats Montgomery into the city, he is relieved of command for slapping a shell-shocked soldier in an Army hospital. This incident, along with his tendency to speak his mind to the press, gets the general in trouble with Washington and he is sidelined from the Invasion of Normandy. Later, he begs his former subordinate, General Omar Bradley (Karl Malden), for a command before the war ends. He is given the U.S. Third Army, and distinguishes himself by sweeping across France and later relieving the vital town of Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge. Later, Patton smashes through the German "West Wall" and drives into Germany itself. George Patton redirects here. ... George Campbell Scott (October 18, 1927 - September 22, 1999) was a stage and film actor, director, and producer. ... Combatants Germany Italy United States United Kingdom Free France Commanders Erwin Rommel Lloyd Fredendall Strength 22,000 30,000 Casualties 2,000 10,000 (including 6,700 Americans) The Battle of Kasserine Pass took place in World War II during the Tunisia Campaign. ... Husky was also the codename of Australian military support to Sierra Leone ending in February 2003. ... Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein, KG, GCB, DSO, PC (17 November 1887 – 24 March 1976), often referred to as Monty, was a British Army officer. ... Messina, Italy Strait of Messina, Italy. ... The military term combat stress reaction (CSR) comprises the range of adverse behaviours in reaction to the stress of combat and combat related activities. ... The Battle of Normandy was fought in 1944 between the German forces occupying Western Europe and the invading Allies. ... Omar Nelson Bradley (February 12, 1893 – April 8, 1981) was one of the main U.S. Army field commanders in North Africa and Europe during World War II and a General of the Army of the United States Army. ... Karl Malden (born on March 22, 1912) is an Emmy Award-winning, Oscar-winning and Golden Globe-nominated American actor, known for his expansive manner. ... Shoulder Sleeve Insignia of the U.S. Third Army. ... The coat of arms of the Bastogne municipality. ... For the 1965 film, see Battle of the Bulge (film). ... Bunker on the Siegfried line The original Siegfried line was a line of defensive forts and tank defences built by Germany along their border with France in 1916-1917 during World War I. However, in English, Siegfried line more commonly refers to the similar World War II defensive line, built...


The movie depicts some of Patton's more controversial actions, for example his remarks following the fall of Germany, casually comparing many average Nazis to American Republicans and Democrats, and remarking to a British crowd that America and Great Britain would dominate the post-war world, which the press finds insulting to the Russians. He also believes in reincarnation, while remaining a devout Christian. At one point in the movie, during the North Africa campaign, Patton takes his staff on an unexpected detour to the site of the ancient Battle of Zama. There he reminisces about the battle, insisting to Omar Bradley that he was there. Although he is shown to be a military genius, the film does not try to conceal Patton's darker, elitist and brutal aspects. The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This article is about the theological concept. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Combatants Carthage Roman Republic East Numidia Commanders Hannibal Scipio Africanus Masinissa Strength almost 58,000 infantry 6,000 cavalry 80 war elephants 34,000 Roman infantry 3,000 Roman cavalry 6,000 Numidian cavalry Casualties 20,000 killed 11,000 wounded 15,000 captured 1,500 killed 4,000 wounded...


Cast

George Campbell Scott (October 18, 1927 - September 22, 1999) was a stage and film actor, director, and producer. ... George Patton redirects here. ... Rod Steiger (April 14, 1925 – July 9, 2002) was an American Academy Award-winning actor best known for his intense performances in such films as In the Heat of the Night, On the Waterfront and Doctor Zhivago. ... Karl Malden (born on March 22, 1912) is an Emmy Award-winning, Oscar-winning and Golden Globe-nominated American actor, known for his expansive manner. ... Omar Nelson Bradley (February 12, 1893 – April 8, 1981) was one of the main U.S. Army field commanders in North Africa and Europe during World War II and a General of the Army of the United States Army. ... Michael Strong (August 17, 1924 - September 29, 1980) was an American film and television actor. ... Michael Bates (December 4, 1920 – January 11, 1978) was a British actor born in Jhansi, British India (now in Uttar Pradesh). ... Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein, KG, GCB, DSO, PC (17 November 1887 – 24 March 1976) was a British Army officer, often referred to as Monty. He successfully commanded Allied forces at the Battle of El Alamein, a major turning point in World War II, and... Franklin Latimore (September 28, 1925 - November 29, 1998) was an American actor best known for his character ‘Dr. Ed Coleridge’ on the television soap opera series Ryans Hope. Latimores came from a well-to-do family, and was able to trace his lineage back to the Revolutionary War. ... Karl Michael Vogler as Field Marshal Erwin Rommel in Patton (1970) Karl Michael Vogler (born August 28, 1928, in Remscheid, Germany) is a German actor perhaps best-known for his appearance as Erwin Rommel in the George C. Scott film Patton. ... Erwin Johannes Eugen Rommel ( ) (15 November 1891 – 14 October 1944) was one of the most famous German field marshals of World War II. He was the commander of the Deutsches Afrika Korps and also became known by the nickname “The Desert Fox” (Wüstenfuchs,  ) for the skillful military campaigns he... Siegfried Rauch (b. ... Alfred Jodl (May 10, 1890 – October 16, 1946) was a German military commander, attaining the position of Chief of the Operations Staff of the Armed Forces High Command (Oberkommando der Wehrmacht, or OKW) during World War II, acting as deputy to Wilhelm Keitel. ... John Doucette (January 21, 1921 - August 16, 1994) was a film character actor. ... Lucian King Truscott, Jr. ... Paul Stevens (born 17 January 1921 in Los Angeles, California - died 4 June 1986 in New York, New York) was an American film and television actor. ... Charles Russell Codman (February 22, 1893 - August 25, 1956) was an American author, wine expert, and aide to General George S. Patton during World War II. Codman was a Boston, Massachusetts native who was born into an old, notable, and wealthy New England family. ... Edward Binns (September 12, 1916-December 4, 1990) was a stage and film actor. ... Walter Bedell Smith as U.S. Ambassador to the Soviet Union. ...

Awards

Scott's performance won him an Academy Award for Best Actor in 1971. He famously refused to accept it[2] --the first actor, though not the last, to do so. The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ...


The film won six additional Academy Awards, for Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Best Director, Best Film Editing, Best Picture, Best Sound and Best Writing, Story and Screenplay Based on Factual Material or Material Not Previously Published or Produced. It was nominated for Best Cinematography, Best Effects, Special Visual Effects and Best Music, Original Score. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Awards are the oldest awards ceremony for achievements in motion pictures. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to directors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ... The Academy Award for Film Editing was first given for films issued in 1934. ... // The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Academy Awards, awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which are voted on by others within the industry. ... The Academy Award for Sound Mixing is an Academy Award that recognizes the finest or most aesthetic sound mixing or recording, and is generally awarded to the production sound mixers and re-recording mixers of the winning film. ... // The Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay is the Academy Award for the best script not based upon previously published material. ... Charles Rosher the first recipient in 1928 The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... The Academy Award for Visual Effects is an Oscar given to one film each year that shows highest achievement in visual effects. ... The Academy Award for Original Music Score is presented to the best substantial body of music in the form of dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer. ...


In 2006, the Writers Guild of America selected the adapted screenplay by Francis Ford Coppola and Edmund North as the 94th best screenplay of all time. The screenplay was based upon the biographies A Soldier's Story by General Omar Bradley, and Patton: Ordeal and Triumph by Ladislas Farago. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Writers Guild of America (WGA) is the collective bargaining representative, or labor union, for writers in the motion picture and television industries in the United States. ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... Omar Nelson Bradley (February 12, 1893 – April 8, 1981) was one of the main U.S. Army field commanders in North Africa and Europe during World War II and a General of the Army of the United States Army. ... Ladislas Farago was a journalist who published a number of popular books on history and espionage, especially concerning the World War II era. ...


Reception

Popular online film critic James Berardinelli has called Patton his favorite film of all time.[3] James Berardinelli (born September 1967, New Brunswick, New Jersey) is an online film critic. ...


According to Woodward and Bernstein's book The Final Days, it was also Richard Nixon's favorite film. He screened it several times at The White House and during a cruise on the Presidential Yacht. Bob Woodward signs his book State of Denial after a talk in March 2007. ... Carl Bernstein (left) and Bob Woodward (right)This image is pending deletion. ... The Final Days is arguably the best of all non - fiction, and journalistic accounts of an American presidency under crisis. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... This page is about the official residence of the President of the USA. For other White Houses see White House (disambiguation). ...


Production

Patton family objections

There were several attempts to make the movie, starting in 1953. The Patton family was approached by the producers for help in making the film. They wanted access to Patton's diaries and input from family members. By coincidence, the day they asked the family was the day after the funeral of Beatrice Ayer Patton, the general's widow. After that, the family was dead set against the movie and refused to give any help to the filmmakers. January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ...


Because of this, Francis Ford Coppola and Edmund H. North wrote the film from two biographies: Patton: Ordeal and Triumph by Ladislas Farago and A Soldier's Story by Omar Bradley. In 2005, Patton's wife's "Button Box" manuscript was finally released by his family, with the posthumous release of Ruth Ellen Patton Totten's book, The Button Box: A Daughter's Loving Memoir of Mrs. George S. Patton.[1] Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... Ladislas Farago was a journalist who published a number of popular books on history and espionage, especially concerning the World War II era. ... Omar Nelson Bradley (February 12, 1893 – April 8, 1981) was one of the main U.S. Army field commanders in North Africa and Europe during World War II and a General of the Army of the United States Army. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The opening

Patton opened with Scott's rendering of General Patton's famous military "Pep Talk" to members of the Third Army, set against a huge American flag. The movie writers had to tone down Patton's actual words and statements throughout the film in order to get a PG rating; in the opening monologue, the word "fornicating" replaced "fucking" when criticizing the Saturday Evening Post newspaper. Interestingly, Scott's gravelly voice is practically the opposite of Patton's, which is reported as having been "strangely high-pitched". Image File history File links Patton1. ... Image File history File links Pattonintro. ... There have been many publications called the Saturday Evening Post; several were/are local British newspapers. ...


During his speech, Patton states (in real life and in the film) that "Americans have never lost and will never lose a war." Historian Shelby Foote observed that this claim was astonishing, as Patton's grandfather had fought for the Army of Northern Virginia during the American Civil War; as the product of a Southern upbringing, Patton would have been well aware of this. Shelby Dade Foote, Jr. ... The Army of Northern Virginia was the primary military force of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War in the eastern theater. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


When Scott learned that the speech would open the film, he refused to do it, as he believed that it would overshadow the rest of his performance.[citation needed] So director Frank Schaffner lied and assured him that it would be shown at the end. It was shot in a basement room.


All the medals and decorations shown on Patton's uniform in the monologue are authentic replicas of those actually awarded to Patton. However, the general never wore all of them in public. Patton wore them all on only one occasion, in his backyard in Virginia at the request of his wife, who wanted a picture of him with all his medals. The producers used a copy of this photo to help recreate this "look" for the opening scene. Also, the ivory-handled revolvers Scott wears in this scene are in fact Patton's, borrowed from the Patton museum.


Locations

The entire film was shot in Spain, except for one scene in Tunisia where Patton visits Carthaginian ruins. The scenes set in Africa and Sicily were shot in the south of Spain, while the winter scenes in France were shot near Madrid (to which the production crew rushed when they were informed that snow had fallen).


Anachronistic props

In common with most contemporary war films, Patton used very few actual World War II vintage tanks, except in archival newsreel footage. The film's tanks were supplied by the Spanish Army, which assisted the production. They included M41 Walker Bulldog, M46 Patton and M47 Patton tanks for the American side, M24 Chaffee tanks for the British, and M48 Patton tanks for the Germans. Of these machines, only the M24 Chaffee design had served in WW2, although not for the British. In reality, General Patton commanded a mixture of M-4 Shermans and, very late in the war, M-26 Pershings. The M41 Walker Bulldog was an American light tank developed to replace the M24 Chaffee. ... The M46, M47, M48 and M60 Patton were the U.S armys principal main battle tanks of the Cold War, with models in service from the late 1940s to the 1990s. ... The M47 Patton was the second tank of the Patton series, and one of the U.S armys principal main battle tanks of the Cold War, with models in service from the early 1950s to the late 1950s. ... The Light Tank M24 was an American light tank used during World War II and in postwar conflicts including the Korean War. ... The M48 Patton was one of the U.S armys principal main battle tanks of the Cold War, with models in service from the early 1950s to the 1990s. ... M4 with 105 mm howitzer and a dozer blade. ... The Heavy Tank M26 Pershing was an American tank used during World War II and the Korean War. ...


Spanish CASA 2.111 airplanes were also used in several scenes. These were heavily modified versions of the German Heinkel He 111, which had been used extensively by the Luftwaffe in World War II. They can be recognized by their engine nacelles, which have a prominent airscoop directly under the propellor, whereas the Heinkel's airscoop was set further back. The CASA 2. ... The Heinkel He 111 was the primary Luftwaffe medium bomber during the early stages of World War II, and is perhaps the most famous symbol of the German side of the Battle of Britain. ... Look up nacelle in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In addition, 1950s M38 Jeeps can be seen, and 1960s M35 cargo trucks were used (for both American and German trucks). M35A2 The M35 series of trucks was one of the most long-lived systems deployed by the U.S. Army. ...


A map of Europe shown in the background in one scene displays post-war national boundaries.


Language error

In one scene, supposedly in Morocco, a supposedly Arab woman is selling "pollos y gallinas" (Chickens and hens) in Spanish, not in Arabic. Of course, the movie was actually filmed in Spain.


Inaccuracies

While serving to illuminate the tension between Patton and Montgomery, there was no competitive race for either to capture Messina before the other. Montgomery actually suggested on July 24 that Patton take Messina since he was in a better position to do so. Messina, Italy Strait of Messina, Italy. ... Husky was also the codename of Australian military support to Sierra Leone ending in February 2003. ...


In one scene, General Patton incorrectly cites Frederick the Great as saying, "L'audace, l'audace, toujours l'audace!" ("Daring, daring - always daring!") This actually originated with Georges Danton. Frederick II (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. ... According to a biographer, Dantons height was colossal, his make athletic, his features strongly marked, coarse, and displeasing; his voice shook the domes of the halls.[1] Georges Jacques Danton (October 26, 1759 – April 5, 1794) was a leading figure in the early stages of the French Revolution and...


There is a scene with a black Packard in wartime England that is a 1948 post war model.


Sequels

A made-for-television sequel, The Last Days of Patton, was produced in 1986. Scott reprised his title role. The movie was based on Patton's final weeks after being mortally injured in a car accident, with flashbacks of Patton's life. Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ...


Cultural references

South Park in Patton-esque pose

Patton's iconic opening and speech before a giant flag has been parodied and copied in numerous films, political cartoons and television shows. Image:South park republican. ... Image:South park republican. ... Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...

  • In an early run of the comic strip Bloom County, Milo Bloom's grandfather coaches a pee-wee football team in the guise of General Patton, equating football with warfare.
  • The opening Stars and Stripes image was also used in pop band The The's video for the single "Heartland", from its Infected album.
  • For the video of his song "Asshole", Denis Leary donned a replica of General Patton's uniform and delivered part of the rant near the song's end in front of the giant American flag.
  • In the film Small Soldiers, Major Chip Hazard, the commander of the "Commando Elite" action figures, addresses his troops on the upcoming battle with an American flag jigsaw puzzle in the background.

Simpsons redirects here. ... Bart the General is the fifth full length episode of The Simpsons. ... Secrets of a Successful Marriage is the 22nd and final episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ... Bloom County was a popular American comic strip by Berke Breathed which ran from December 8, 1980 until August 6, 1989. ... The The are an English musical and multimedia group that have been around since 1979 in various forms, with Matt Johnson being the only constant band member. ... Heartland is a most often a geopolitical term, often used to refer to a central area of Eurasia that is remote and inaccessible from the periphery. ... An infection is the detrimental colonization of a host organism by a foreign species. ... Asshole is the first and only single from Denis Learys 1993 album No Cure for Cancer. ... Denis Leary (born Denis Colin Leary on August 18, 1957) is a Golden Globe and Emmy Award-nominated American actor, comedian, writer and director. ... Smokey and the Bandit is a 1977 movie starring Burt Reynolds, Sally Field, Jackie Gleason, Jerry Reed, Pat McCormick, Paul Williams, and Mike Henry. ... Poster showing Jackie Gleason as Sheriff Buford T Justice Sheriff Buford T. Justice is the fictional character played by Jackie Gleason in the movies Smokey and the Bandit (1977), Smokey and the Bandit II (1980) and Smokey and the Bandit Part 3 (1983). ... Herbert John Jackie Gleason (February 26, 1916 – June 24, 1987) was an American comedian, actor, and musician. ... Adult Swim is the name for an adult-oriented television programming network. ... Sealab 2021 is an American animated television series shown on Cartoon Networks adult-oriented programming block, Adult Swim. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ...

See also

During World War II, the North African Campaign, also known as the Desert War, took place in the North African desert from September 13, 1940 to May 13, 1943. ... Combatants United Kingdom United States France Germany Italy Commanders Dwight D. Eisenhower Harold Alexander Keneth Anderson Bernard Montgomery Albert Kesselring Erwin Rommel Hans-Jürgen von Arnim Giovanni Messe The Tunisia Campaign (also known as the Battle of Tunisia), was a series of World War II battles that took place... Erwin Johannes Eugen Rommel ( ) (15 November 1891 – 14 October 1944) was one of the most famous German field marshals of World War II. He was the commander of the Deutsches Afrika Korps and also became known by the nickname “The Desert Fox” (Wüstenfuchs,  ) for the skillful military campaigns he... For the 1965 film, see Battle of the Bulge (film). ...

References

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Patton (film)
Awards
Preceded by
Midnight Cowboy
Academy Award for Best Picture
1970
Succeeded by
The French Connection

 
 

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