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Patois, although without a formal definition in linguistics, can be used to describe a language considered as nonstandard. Depending upon the instance, it can refer to pidgins, creoles, dialects, and other forms of native or local speech, but is not commonly applied to jargon or slang, which are vocabulary-based forms of cant. Class distinctions are embedded in the term, drawn between those who speak patois and those who speak the standard or dominant language used in literature and newscasts—the "acrolect" in professional jargon. Broadly conceived, linguistics is the scientific study of human language, and a linguist is someone who engages in this study. ... A nonstandard dialect of a language is a dialect of a language that does not have the institutional support or sanction that a standardized dialect has. ... A Pidgin, or contact language, is the name given to any language created, usually spontaneously, out of a mixture of other languages as a means of communication between speakers of different tongues. ... A Creole is a language descended from a pidgin that has become the native language of a group of people. ... A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language used by people from a particular geographic area. ... You may have reached this page trying to find the Jargon File A jargon is a type of slang which is used in conjunction with a specific activity, e. ... Jump to: navigation, search Slang is the non-standard use of words in a language of a particular social group, and sometimes the creation of new words or importation of words from another language. ... The word cant can mean more than one thing: Cant is insincere speech, similar to hypocrisy. ... A newscast typically consists of the coverage of various news events and other information, either produced locally by a radio or television station, or by a broadcast network. ... An acrolect is a register of a language that is considered formal and high style. ...


The French word patois is from Old French patoier meaning "to handle clumsily, to paw". The language sense is probably from the notion of a clumsy manner of speaking. In France, patois has been used to describe non-Parisian French, provincial languages and dialects spoken in France, such as Breton Occitan and Savoyard since 1643. The word assumes the view of such languages as being backwards, countrified and unlettered, thus is considered by speakers of those languages as offensive. (See also: Languages of France.) Jump to: navigation, search Breton (Brezhoneg) is a Celtic language spoken by some of the inhabitants of Brittany in France. ... Occitan, or langue doc is a Romance language characterized by its richness, variability, and by the intelligibility of its dialects. ... Savoyard is a dialect of Arpitan language spoken in Savoie, in Haute-Savoie, in Swiss Valais and in the Italian region of Aosta. ... There are a number of languages of France, although the French language is by far the most widely spoken and the only official language of the country. ...


Many of the vernacular forms of English spoken in the Caribbean are also referred to as patois (occasionally spelled in this context patwah). It is noted especially in reference to Jamaican Creole from 1934. Often these patois are popularly considered "bastardizations" of English or slang, however cases such as Jamaican are classified with more correctness as a creole language; in fact, in the Francophone Caribbean the analogous term for local variants of French is creole. (See also: Jamaican English and Jamaican Creole.) Patois is also spoken in the Atlantic coast of Costa Rica and in the Lesser Antilles country St Lucia. ... Jamaican English or Jamaican Standard English is a dialect of English encompassing in a very unique way, parts and mergers of both American English and British English dialects. ... Jamaican Creole, also known as Patois/(Patwa) or simply Jamaican, is an English/African-based language --not to be confused with Jamaican English nor with the Rastafarian use of English-- used primarily on the island of Jamaica. ... The Lesser Antilles are part of the Antilles, which together with the Greater Antilles form the West Indies. ...


Other examples of patois include Trasianka, Sheng, and Tsotsitaal. Trasianka or trasyanka (be: трасянка) is a Belarusian–Russian patois or a kind of interlanguage (from the linguistic point of view). ... Sheng is a Swahili-based patois, originating in Nairobi, Kenya, and influenced by the many languages spoken there. ...


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Patois (3725 words)
The debate surrounding the use of Patois as opposed to Standard English includes a number of issues and dates back to the times of slavery when Jamaicans had Standard English presented as a superior language and the indigenous language was denigrated to an inferior status.
In Jamaica, in addition to the Jamaican patois of the roots, the development of Rastafarianism has caused Rastas to develop a language and vocabulary of their own (Nicholas, 1996, p.38), and for the purpose of this paper it will be referred to as Rasta talk.
When she was teaching English to young children who came from Patois speaking backgrounds, she would write a sentence in Patois and then next to it, the same sentence in "Standard" English, to help the children understand what the sentence means and to help them learn how to read and write.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Patois (1035 words)
Patois was the source material employed to form a new cultural perspective, a new understanding of the role of language ''as an edifice on which is constructed ';0 racial pride and power as well as a defence against the assimilationist t, encroachment of the dominant society" (Wong 1986: 113, qtd.
The debate surrounding the use of Patois as opposed to Standard English includes a number of issues and dates back to the times of slavery when Jamaicans had Standard English presented as a superior language and the indigenous language was denigrated to an inferior status.
In Jamaica, in addition to the Jamaican patois of the roots, the development of Rastafarianism has caused Rastas to develop a language and vocabulary of their own (Nicholas, 1996, p.38), and for the purpose of this paper it will be referred to as Rasta talk.
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