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Encyclopedia > Pastiche

The word pastiche describes a literary or other artistic genre. The word has two competing meanings, either meaning a "hodge-podge" or an imitation. Both meanings are discussed below. Look up genre in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Hodge-Podge the rabbit is a fictitious character from Berke Breatheds comic strip Bloom County. ... Imitation is an advanced animal behaviour whereby an individual observes anothers behaviour and replicates it itself. ...

Contents

History and usage

The "hodge-podge" meaning of the word came first, appearing in English in the late 19th century. Over the course of the 20th century, pastiche shifted in its meaning, so that now it can be used by educated speakers as described in the second section, without any necessary connotation of hodge-podge. However, some readers intuit the "hodge-podge" reading to be the dominant or even the only meaning. The variation almost certainly results from the fact that the word is fairly rare — most readers acquire their sense of the word from just a few examples. The word is routinely used by advocates of modern architectural styles to disparage new architecture which reflects traditional styles, the mere invocation of the word often being considered sufficient to condemn a design as unworthy of further consideration. In light of the ongoing semantic drift, it would seem that writers should use the word with caution. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Semantic drift, in historical linguistics, is a phenomenon whereby words change in meaning over a period of time, resulting in semantic differences between cognates. ...


Pastiche as hodge-podge

In this usage, a work is called pastiche if it was cobbled together in imitation of several original works. As the Oxford English Dictionary puts it, a pastiche in this sense is "a medley of various ingredients; a hotchpotch, farrago, jumble." This meaning accords with etymology: pastiche is the French version of greco-roman dish pasticcio, which designated a kind of pie made of many different ingredients. Hodge-Podge the rabbit is a fictitious character from Berke Breatheds comic strip Bloom County. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is generally regarded as the most comprehensive and scholarly dictionary of the English language. ...


In the 18th century, opera pasticcios were frequently made by composers as notable as George Frideric Handel (e.g. Giove in Argo), Christoph Willibald Gluck, and Johann Christian Bach. These composite works would consist mainly of portions of other composers' work, although they could also include original composition. The portions borrowed from other composers would be more or less freely adapted, especially in the case of arias in pasticcio operas by substituting a new text for the original one. The Teatro alla Scala in Milan. ... George Frideric Handel (23 February 1685 – 14 April 1759) was a German/British Baroque composer who was a leading composer of concerti grossi, operas and oratorios. ... Giove in Argo (or Jupiter in Argos) (HWV A14) is an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel. ... Christoph Willibald Gluck (July 2, 1714 – November 15, 1787) was a German composer. ... Johann Christian Bach, painted in London by Thomas Gainsborough, 1776 ( Museo Civico, Bologna) Johann Christian Bach (September 5, 1735 – January 1, 1782) was a composer of the Classical era. ... This article is about the musical term aria. ...


Although there were many opera pasticcios in the 18th century, instrumental works would also sometimes be assembled from pre-existing compositions, a notable instance of this being the first four piano concertos of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. These concertos (K. 37, 39-41) were assembled almost entirely from keyboard sonata movements by contemporary composers, to which the boy Mozart added orchestral parts supporting the keyboard soloist. A grand piano, with the lid up. ... The term concerto (plural is concerti or concertos) usually refers to a musical work in which one solo instrument is accompanied by an orchestra. ... Mozart redirects here. ... (For a list organized by genre, see List_of_compositions_by_Wolfgang_Amadeus_Mozart) The Köchel-Verzeichnis is a complete, chronological catalogue of compositions by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart which was originally created by Ludwig von Köchel. ... Sonata (From Latin and Italian sonare, to sound), in music, literally means a piece played as opposed to cantata (Latin and Italian cantare, to sing), a piece sung. ... A philharmonic orchestra An orchestra is an instrumental ensemble, usually a fairly large instrumental ensemble with string, brass, woodwind sections, and possibly a percussion section as well. ...


Some works of art are pastiche in both senses of the term; for example, the David Lodge novel and the Star Wars series mentioned below appreciatively imitate work from multiple sources.


Pastiche mass

A pastiche mass is a mass where the constituent movements are from different Mass settings.


Masses are composed by classical composers as a set of movements. Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, Agnus Dei vis: Missa Sollenelle of Beethoven, the Notre Dame mass of Machaut. In a pastiche mass, the performers may choose a Kyrie from one composer, and a Gloria from another - or, choose a Kyrie from one setting of an individual composer, and a Gloria from another. Kyrie is the vocative case of the Greek word κύριος (kyrios - lord) and means O Lord; it is the common name of an important prayer of Christian liturgy, also called Kyrie eleison. ... Gloria in Excelsis Deo (Latin for Glory to God on High) is the title and beginning of the great doxology (song of praise) used in the Roman Catholic Mass and, in translation, in the services of many other Christian churches. ... In Latin, the word credo means I believe. ... Sanctus is the Latin word for holy, and is the name of an important hymn of Christian liturgy. ... Agnus Dei is a Latin term meaning Lamb of God, and was originally used to refer to Jesus Christ in his role of the perfect sacrificial offering that atones for the sins of man in Christian theology, harkening back to ancient Jewish Temple sacrifices. ...


Most often this convention is chosen for concert performances, particularly by early music ensembles.


Pastiche as imitation

In this usage, the term denotes a literary technique employing a generally light-hearted tongue-in-cheek imitation of another's style; although jocular, it is usually respectful (as opposed to parody, which is not). A Literary technique or literary device may be used by works of literature in order to produce a specific effect on the reader. ... Parody of Back to the Future In contemporary usage, a parody is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ...


For example, many stories featuring Sherlock Holmes, originally created by Arthur Conan Doyle, have been written as pastiches since the author's time. David Lodge's novel The British Museum Is Falling Down (1965) is a pastiche of works by Joyce, Kafka, and Virginia Woolf. Much fan fiction is pastiche. Sherlock Holmes as imagined by the seminal Holmesian artist, Sidney Paget, in The Strand magazine. ... Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and the adventures of Professor Challenger. ... David Lodge (born January 28, 1935 at London, England) is a British author. ... The British Museum Is Falling Down (1965) is a comic novel by David Lodge about a 25 year-old poverty-stricken student of English literature who, rather than working on his thesis (entitled The Structure of Long Sentences in Three Modern English Novels) in the reading room of the British... See also: 1964 in literature, other events of 1965, 1966 in literature, list of years in literature. ... James Joyce James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (Irish Seamus Seoighe; 2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish writer and poet, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. ... Kafka at the age of five Franz Kafka (IPA: ) (July 3, 1883 – June 3, 1924) was one of the major German-language novelists and short story writers of the 20th century, whose unique body of writing — much of it incomplete, and published posthumously despite his wish that much of it... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Fan fiction (also spelled fanfiction and commonly abbreviated to fanfic) is fiction written by people who enjoy a film, novel, television show or other media work, using the characters and situations developed in it and developing new plots in which to use these characters. ...


Pastiche is also found in non-literary works, including art and music. For instance, Charles Rosen has characterized Mozart's various works in imitation of Baroque style as pastiche, and Edvard Grieg's Holberg Suite was written as a conscious homage to the music of an earlier age. Many of "Weird Al" Yankovic's songs are pastiches: for example, Dare to Be Stupid is a Devo pastiche, and "Bob" from the album Poodle Hat is a pastiche of Bob Dylan. Charles Rosen (born May 5, 1927) is an American pianist and music theorist. ... Mozart redirects here. ... Baroque music describes an era and a set of styles of European classical music which were in widespread use between approximately 1600 to 1750 (see Dates of classical music eras for a discussion of the problems inherent in defining the beginning and end points). ... Edvard Hagerup Grieg (15 June 1843 – 4 September 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist who composed in the romantic period. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Weird Al Yankovic (album) Alfred Matthew Weird Al Yankovic (IPA pronunciation: ; born October 23, 1959) is an American musician, satirist, parodist, accordionist, and television producer. ... Dare To Be Stupid is an original song by Weird Al Yankovic. ... Devo (pronounced DEE-vo or dee-VO, often spelled DEVO or DEV-O) is an American Rock group formed in Akron, Ohio in 1972. ... Poodle Hat is the eleventh album by Weird Al Yankovic, that was released on May 20, 2003. ... Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, musician, and poet who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. ...


Pastiche is prominent in popular culture. Many genre writings, particularly in fantasy, are essentially pastiches. The Star Wars series of films by George Lucas is often considered to be a pastiche of traditional science fiction television serials (or radio shows). Popular culture, or pop culture, (literally: the culture of the people) consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... This article is about the series. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ...


The films of Quentin Tarantino are often described as pastiches, as they often pay tribute to (or imitate) pulp novels, blaxploitation and/or Chinese kung fu films, though some say his films are more of a homage. The same definition is said to apply to Hideo Kojima as well. Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, actor, and Oscar-winning screenwriter. ... Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (Melvin Van Peebles 1971) Blaxploitation is a film genre that emerged in the United States in the early 1970s when many exploitation films were made that targeted the urban African American audience; the word itself is a combination of the words black and exploitation. Blaxploitation... It has been suggested that Kung fu film be merged into this article or section. ... For a description of the medieval homage ceremony see commendation ceremony Homage is generally used in modern English to mean any public show of respect to someone to whom you feel indebted. ... Hideo Kojima , born August 24, 1963) is a Japanese video game designer at Konami. ...


Pastiche can also be a cinematic device wherein the creator of the film pays homage to another filmmaker's style and use of cinematography, including camera angles, lighting, and mise en scène. A film's writer may also offer a pastiche based on the works of other writers (this is especially evident in historical films and documentaries but can be found in non-fiction drama, comedy and horror films as well). In Computer Games and video games, in-game videos, as well as intros and ending sequences are usually called cinematics. ... For a description of the medieval homage ceremony see commendation ceremony Homage is generally used in modern English to mean any public show of respect to someone to whom you feel indebted. ... Cinematography [Greek: kine (movement) and graphos (writing)], is the discipline of making lighting and camera choices when recording photographic images for the cinema. ... Lighting refers to either artificial light sources such as lamps or to natural illumination of interiors from daylight. ... Mise en scène [mizɑ̃sÉ›n] has been called film criticisms grand undefined term, but that is not because of a lack of definitions. ... Documentary film is a broad category of cinematic expression united by the intent to remain factual or non-fictional. ... Non-fiction is an account or representation of a subject which is presented as fact. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humour with an intent to provoke laughter in general). ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Well-known academic Fredric Jameson has a somewhat more critical view of pastiche, describing it as "blank parody" (Jameson, 1991), especially with reference to the postmodern parodic practices of self-reflexivity and intertextuality. By this is meant that rather than being a jocular but still respectful imitation of another style, pastiche in the postmodern era has become a "dead language", without any political or historical content, and so has also become unable to satirize in any effective way. Whereas pastiche used to be a humorous literary style, it has, in postmodernism, become "devoid of laughter" (Jameson, 1991). Fredric Jameson (b. ... A self-reference is possible when there are two logical levels, a level and a meta-level. ... Intertextuality is the shaping of texts meanings by other texts. ...


Pastiche as Continuation

Among Conan the Barbarian fans the term Pastiche is used to describe official follow-ups to the Robert E. Howard stories. Hither came Conan, the Cimmerian, black-haired, sullen-eyed, sword in hand, a thief, a reaver, a slayer, with gigantic melancholies and gigantic mirth, to tread the jeweled thrones of the Earth under his sandalled feet. ... Robert Ervin Howard (January 22, 1906 – June 11, 1936)[1] was a classic American pulp writer of fantasy, horror, historical adventure, boxing, western, and detective fiction. ...


In "The Languages of Pao"

In the science fiction novel "The Languages of Pao" by Jack Vance, a daring experiment in social engineering - the careful creation of three articifial langugues, each spoken by a specially-brought up social caste - goes in an unexpected direction when the young people on their own create a fourth langugue named "Pastiche", made up of words and grammatical rules taken at random from the three planned one and from their original tongue. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Jack Vance John Holbrook Vance (b. ... Social engineering has several meanings: Social engineering (political science) Social engineering (computer security) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


See also

Parody of Back to the Future In contemporary usage, a parody is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Fan fiction (also spelled fanfiction and commonly abbreviated to fanfic) is fiction written by people who enjoy a film, novel, television show or other media work, using the characters and situations developed in it and developing new plots in which to use these characters. ... Dōjinshi (; also romanized as doujinshi) are self-published Japanese works, including but not limited to comic books (manga), novels, fan guides, art collections, and games. ... For a description of the medieval homage ceremony see commendation ceremony Homage is generally used in modern English to mean any public show of respect to someone to whom you feel indebted. ... An archetype is a generic, idealized model of a person, object or concept from which similar instances are derived, copied, patterned or emulated. ...

Notes

    References and further reading

    Jameson, Fredric. Postmodernism, or, the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism. Durham: Duke UP, 1991.


    "Pasticcio" in Don Michael Randel, ed., The New Harvard Dictionary of Music. Cambridge, MA: Bellnap Press of Harvard University Press, 1986 (ISBN 0-674-61525-5), p. 614.


      Results from FactBites:
     
    Pastiche - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (689 words)
    Pastiche can also be a cinematic device wherein the creator of the film pays homage to another filmmaker's style and use of cinematography, including camera angles, lighting, and mise-en-scene.
    A film's writer may also offer a pastiche based on the works of other writers (this is especially evident in historical films and documentaries but can be found in non-fiction drama, comedy and horror films as well).
    Pastiche is also used with a rather different meaning: a work is called pastiche if it was cobbled together in imitation of several original works.
    Pastiche - definition of Pastiche in Encyclopedia (473 words)
    Pastiche can also be a cinematic device wherein the "author" of the film pays homage to another filmmaker's style and use of cinematography, including camera angles, lighting, and mise-en-scene.
    In light of the ongoing semantic drift, it would seem that writers should use the word with caution.
    Pastiche was also the name of an album recorded by the musical group Manhattan Transfer (1978).
      More results at FactBites »

     
     

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