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Encyclopedia > Pasta
Pasta, dry, unenriched
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 370 kcal   1550 kJ
Carbohydrates     75 g
- Starch  62 g
- Sugars  2 g
- Dietary fibre  3 g  
Fat 1.5 g
Protein 13 g
Water 10 g
Folate (Vit. B9)  18 μg  5%
Percentages are relative to US
recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database

Pasta is an Italian food made from a dough using flour, water and/or eggs. Lactose is a disaccharide found in milk. ... Starch (CAS# 9005-25-8, chemical formula (C6H10O5)n,[1]) is a mixture of amylose and amylopectin (usually in 20:80 or 30:70 ratios). ... Dietary fibers are the indigestible portion of plant foods that move food through the digestive system, absorbing water and making defecation easier. ... For other uses, see FAT. Fats consist of a wide group of compounds that are generally soluble in organic solvents and largely insoluble in water. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin showing coloured alpha helices. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... Folic acid (the anion form is called folate) is a B-complex vitamin (once called vitamin M) that is important in preventing neural tube defects (NTDs) in the developing human fetus. ... Reference Daily Intake (RDI) is the daily dietary intake level of a nutrient considered sufficient to meet the requirements of nearly all (97–98%) healthy individuals in each life-stage and gender group. ... Dough Dough is a paste made out of any cereals (grains) or leguminous crops by grinding with small amount of water. ... For other uses, see Flour (disambiguation). ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... Chicken egg (left) and quail eggs (right), the types of egg commonly used as food An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo. ...


There are approximately 350 different shapes of pasta.[1] A few examples include spaghetti (solid, thin cylinders), maccheroni (tubes or hollow cylinders), fusilli (swirls), lasagne (sheets), and gnocchi (balls), although this is considered a separate dish by some. The two basic styles of pasta are dried and fresh. There are also variations in the ingredients used in pasta. The time for which pasta can be stored varies from days to years depending upon whether the pasta is made with egg or not, and whether it is dried or fresh[2]. Pasta is boiled prior to consumption. For other uses, see Spaghetti (disambiguation). ... The word cylinder has several meanings. ... For other uses, see Macaroni (disambiguation) Penne, a very common kind of maccheroni in Italy. ... Tubing refers to a flexible hose or pipe used in plumbing, irrigation, and other industries. ... Rainbow fusili Fusilli, a helical shaped pasta, is usually about 4 centimetres long. ... Lasagne Lasagne, also lasagna, is both a form of pasta in sheets (often rippled in North America, though seldom so in Italy) and also a dish, sometimes named Lasagne al forno (meaning Lasagne in the oven) made with alternate layers of pasta, cheese, and ragu (a meat sauce). ... Gnocchi with truffle. ... Boiling is the rapid vaporization of a liquid, which occurs when a liquid is heated to a temperature such that its vapor pressure is above that of the surroundings. ...


The word, pasta, can also denote dishes in which pasta products are the primary ingredient, served with sauce or seasonings.

From Italian pasta, from Latin pasta "dough, pastry cake, paste", from Greek πάστα (pasta) "barley porridge".
[3]
Boy with Spaghetti by Julius Moser, c.1808
Boy with Spaghetti by Julius Moser, c.1808

Contents

For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Spaghetti (disambiguation). ...

Ingredients

There are many ingredients that can be used to make pasta dough. They range from a simple flour and water mixture, to those that call for the addition of eggs, spices and cheeses, or even squid ink to the dough.


Under Italian law, dry pasta can only be made from durum wheat or semolina flour. Durum flour has a yellow tinge in color. Italian pasta is traditionally cooked al dente (Italian: "to the tooth", meaning not too soft). Abroad, dry pasta is frequently made from other types of flour (such as farina), but this yields a softer product, which cannot be cooked al dente. Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum durum) is the only tetraploid species of wheat widely cultivated today. ... Picture of semolina Semolina grains Semolina is coarsely ground grain, usually wheat, with particles mostly between 0. ... The name farina is used in a number of circumstances: Farina (from the Italian for flour) is a bland-tasting meal made from cereal grains. ...


Particular varieties of pasta may also use other grains and/or milling methods to make the flour. Some pasta varieties, such as Pizzoccheri, are made from buckwheat flour. Various types of fresh pasta include eggs (pasta all'uovo). Gnocchi are often listed among pasta dishes, although they are quite different in ingredients (mainly milled potatoes). A portion of Pizzoccheri Pizzoccheri are a type of tagliatelle, a flat ribbon pasta, made with buckwheat flour. ... Binomial name Fagopyrum esculentum Moench Common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is a plant in the genus Fagopyrum (sometimes merged into genus Polygonum) in the family Polygonaceae. ... Chicken egg (left) and quail eggs (right), the types of egg commonly used as food An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo. ... Gnocchi with truffle. ... For other uses, see Potato (disambiguation). ...


History

Making pasta; illustration from the 15th century edition of Tacuinum Sanitatis, a Latin translation of the Arabic work Taqwīm al-sihha by Ibn Butlan.
Making pasta; illustration from the 15th century edition of Tacuinum Sanitatis, a Latin translation of the Arabic work Taqwīm al-sihha by Ibn Butlan.[4]

Though the Chinese were eating noodles as long ago as 2000 BC (this is known thanks to the discovery of a well-preserved bowl of noodles over 4000 years old[5]), the familiar legend of Marco Polo importing pasta from China is just that—a legend[6], whose origins lie not in Polo's Travels, but in the newsletter of the National Macaroni Manufacturers Association.[7] The works of the 2nd century CE Greek physician Galen mention itrion, homogeneous compounds made up of flour and water.[8] The Jerusalem Talmud records that itrium, a kind of boiled dough,[8] was common in Palestine from the 3rd to 5th centuries CE[9] A dictionary compiled by the 9th century Syrian physician and lexicographer Isho bar Ali defines itriyya as stringlike pasta shapes made of semolina and dried before cooking, a recognizable ancestor of modern-day dried pasta.[8] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 553 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1000 × 1084 pixel, file size: 303 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Tacuina sanitatis (XIV century) العربية | ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 553 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1000 × 1084 pixel, file size: 303 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Tacuina sanitatis (XIV century) العربية | ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda... The Tacuinum (sometimes Taccuinum) Sanitatis is a medieval handbook on wellness, based on the Taqwin al‑sihha (Tables of Health), an Arab medical treatise by Ibn Butlan; it exists in several variant Latin versions, the manuscripts of which are profusely illustrated. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... Ibn Butlan (d. ... A cook making hand-pulled noodles. ... BC may stand for: Before Christ (see Anno Domini) : an abbreviation used to refer to a year before the beginning of the year count that starts with the supposed year of the birth of Jesus. ... Marco Polo (September 15, 1254[1] – January 9, 1324 at earliest but no later than June 1325[2]) was a Venetian trader and explorer who gained fame for his worldwide travels, recorded in the book Il Milione (The Million or The Travels of Marco Polo). ... A page of The Travels of Marco Polo The Travels of Marco Polo is the usual English title of Marco Polos travel book, Il Milione. ... For other uses, see Galen (disambiguation). ... The Jerusalem Talmud (In Hebrew Talmud Yerushalmi, in short known as the Yerushalmi), also known as the Palestinian Talmud, like its Babylonian counterpart (see Babylonian Talmud), is a collection of Rabbinic discussions elaborating on the Mishnah. ...

One form of itrion with a long history is laganum (plural lagana), which in Latin refers to a thin sheet of dough.[10] In the 1st century BC work of Horace, lagana were fine sheets of dough which were fried[11] and were an everyday food.[10] Writing in the 2nd century Athenaeus of Naucratis provides a recipe for lagana which he attributes to the 1st century Chrysippus of Tyana: very fine sheets of a dough made of wheat flour and the juice of crushed lettuce, then flavored with spices and deep-fried in oil.[10] An early 5th century cookbook describes a dish called lagana that consisted of several layers of rolled-out dough alternating with meat stuffing and baked in an oven, a recognizable ancestor of modern-day Lasagna.[10] Lasagne Lasagne, also lasagna, is both a form of pasta in sheets (often rippled in North America, though seldom so in Italy) and also a dish, sometimes named Lasagne al forno (meaning Lasagne in the oven) made with alternate layers of pasta, cheese, and ragu (a meat sauce). ... Athenaeus (Αθηναιος Athenaios; fl. ... This article is about the pasta dish. ...


The innovation of dried pasta, in the form of long thin noodles we use today (spaghetti), is documented by Arabs[4] who wrote of its existence in Southern Italy (i.e. Trabia, Sicily) around the 12th Century. Prior to this, Italians are said to have eaten their pasta freshly made (pasta fresca) in a gnocchi and lasagna like forms.


Accompaniments

Common pasta sauces in Northern Italy include pesto and ragù alla bolognese; in Central Italy, simple tomato sauce, amatriciana and carbonara, and in Southern Italy, spicy tomato, garlic, and olive oil based sauces, often paired with fresh vegetables or seafood. Varieties include puttanesca, pasta alla norma (tomatoes, eggplant and fresh or baked cheese), pasta con le sarde (fresh sardines, pine nuts, fennel and olive oil), spaghetti aglio, olio e peperoncino (literally with garlic, (olive) oil and hot chili peppers). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2970x1980, 3367 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pasta Pesto Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2970x1980, 3367 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pasta Pesto Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Cavatappi or Scoobi Do is an S shaped macaroni noodle. ... Northern Italy comprises of two areas belonging to NUTS level 1: North-West (Nord-Ovest): Aosta Valley, Piedmont, Lombardy, Liguria North-East (Nord-Est): Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Veneto, Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol, Emilia-Romagna Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol and Aosta Valley are regions with a... Pesto (italian pron. ... Rigatoni with bolognese sauce Bolognese sauce (ragù alla bolognese in Italian, also known by its French name sauce bolognaise) is a meat based sauce for pasta originating in Bologna, Italy. ... Central Italy, encompasses six of the countrys 20 autonomous regions: Abruzzo Lazio Marche Molise Toscana Umbria Although the regions of Abruzzo and Molise are geographically located in Central Italy, the European office for statistics (Eurostat) lists these two regions within Southern Italy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Amatriciana is a type of Italian pasta sauce not uncommon in most restaurants and Italian cafes. ... Carbonara means coal like carbon and only miners in italy eat it. ... Southern Italy, often referred to in Italian as the Mezzogiorno (a term first used in 19th century in comparison with French Midi ) encompasses six of the countrys 20 regions: Basilicata Campania Calabria Puglia Sicilia Sardinia Sicilia although it is geographically and administratively included in Insular Italy, it has a... Pasta Puttanesca is a traditional Italian pasta dish made with a sauce named sugo alla puttanesca. ...


Fettuccine alfredo, with butter and cheese, and spaghetti with tomato sauce with or without ground meat or meatballs are popular Italian-style dishes in the United States. Fettuccine alfredo topped with shrimp. ...


As pasta is introduced elsewhere in the world, it has been incorporated into a number of local cuisines that may have significantly different ways of preparations from those of its country of origin. In Hong Kong, the local Chinese has adopted pasta, primarily spaghetti and macaroni, as an ingredient in the Hong Kong-style Western cuisine. In the territory's Cha chaan tengs, pasta, most commonly macaroni, is cooked in water, and served in broth with ham or frankfurter sausages, peas, black mushrooms, and optionally eggs reminiscent of noodle soup dishes. This is often a course for breakfast or light lunch fare [12]. The method often involves cooking the pasta well beyond the al dente stage and washing the starches off the pasta after cooking, measures frowned upon in Italy or in Hong Kong's more authentic Italian eateries. For other uses, see Spaghetti (disambiguation). ... Penne, a very common kind of maccheroni in Italy. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Cha chaan teng is a type of Chinese tea restaurant commonly found in Hong Kong, known for its eclectic and affordable menus which include many dishes from Hong Kong cuisine and localised Hong Kong-style Western cuisine. ... This article is about the cut of meat. ... This article is about the prepared meat. ... Binomial name Lentinula edodes (Berk. ... Chicken egg (left) and quail eggs (right), the types of egg commonly used as food An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo. ... Noodle soup refers to a variety of dishes with noodles served in stock and other ingredients. ... In cooking, the adjective al dente (pronounced al DEN-tay) describes pasta and (less commonly) rice that have been cooked to be edible but still firm, or vegetables that are cooked to the tender crisp phase - still offering resistance to the bite, but cooked through. ...


See also

Some different colours and shapes of pasta, in a pasta specialty store in Venice. ... Italian cuisine as a national cuisine known today has evolved through centuries of social and political change. ... Cooking is the act of preparing food. ...

References

  1. ^ History of Pasta. Retrieved on 2008-04-06.
  2. ^ BBC Food - Get cooking - Pasta. Retrieved on 2008-04-06.
  3. ^ pasta - Wiktionary. Retrieved on 2008-04-06.
  4. ^ a b Watson, Andrew M (1983). Agricultural innovation in the early Islamic world. New York: Cambridge University Press. p. 22-3
  5. ^ Lu, Houyuan, et al. (13 October 2005). "Culinary archaeology: Millet noodles in Late Neolithic China". Nature 437: 967–968. DOI:10.1038/437967a.  news  abstract.
  6. ^ National Pasta Association article FAQs section "Who "invented" pasta?"
  7. ^ Serventi, Silvano; Françoise Sabban (2002). Pasta: The Story of a Universal Food, Trans. Antony Shugaar, New York: Columbia University Press, 10. ISBN 0231124422. 
  8. ^ a b c Serventi & Sabban 2002:17
  9. ^ Serventi & Sabban 2002:29
  10. ^ a b c d Serventi & Sabban 2002:15–16
  11. ^ Serventi & Sabban 2002:24
  12. ^ AP, Explore the world of Canto-Western cuisine, January 8, 2007 http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16440507/

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The headquarters of the Cambridge University Press, in Trumpington Street, Cambridge. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Pasta
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Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on
Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ... Cuisine (from French cuisine, cooking; culinary art; kitchen; ultimately from Latin coquere, to cook) is a specific set of cooking traditions and practices, often associated with a specific culture. ... Asian cuisine is a term for the various cuisines of South, East and Southeast Asia and for fusion dishes based on combining them. ... See the individual entries for: // Belarusian cuisine Bulgarian cuisine Czech cuisine Hungarian cuisine Jewish cuisine Polish cuisine Romanian cuisine Russian cuisine Slovak cuisine Slovenian cuisine Ukrainian cuisine British cuisine English cuisine Scottish cuisine Welsh cuisine Anglo-Indian cuisine Modern British cuisine Nordic cuisine Danish cuisine Finnish cuisine Icelandic cuisine Lappish... Caribbean cuisine is a fusion of African, Amerindian, French, Indian, and Spanish cuisine. ... South Asian cuisine includes the cuisines of the South Asia. ... Latin American cuisine is a phrase that refers to typical foods, beverages, and cooking styles common to many of the countries and cultures in Latin America. ... The term Middle Eastern cuisine refers to the various cuisines of the Middle East. ... North American cuisine is a term used for foods native to or popular in countries of North America. ... The cuisine of Africa reflects indigenous traditions, as well as influences from Arabs, Europeans, and Asians. ... Haute cuisine (literally high cooking in French) or grande cuisine refers to the cooking of the grand restaurants and hotels of the western world. ... Fusion cuisine combines elements of various culinary traditions whilst not fitting specifically into any. ... Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ... For other uses, see Bread (disambiguation). ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sauce (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Soup (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Desert. ... For other uses, see Herb (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Spice (disambiguation). ... Food is any substance, usually composed primarily of carbohydrates, fats, water and/or proteins, that can be eaten or drunk by an animal for nutrition and/or pleasure. ... Cooking is the act of preparing food. ... This is a list of food preparation utensils, some of what is known as kitchenware. ... In recipes, quantities of ingredients may be specified by mass (weight), by volume, or by count. ... A kitchen is a room used for food preparation and sometimes entertainment. ... For the coarsely ground flour, see flour. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
National Pasta Association: Information on Pasta Recipes, Pasta Nutrition, Complex Carbohydrates and More. (378 words)
For generations, pasta has been a part of family traditions from weeknight meals to holiday feasts.
With the introduction of nutritionally enhanced pasta varieties such as whole wheat, whole grain, pasta with omega-3 and high fiber pasta, there are now more options than ever for consumers to enjoy healthy and economical meals the whole family will love.
The National Pasta Association recommends four to six quarts of water for each pound of dry pasta.
Pasta - MSN Encarta (711 words)
Italian pastas, such as spaghetti and macaroni, are traditionally made from semolina flour derived from durum wheat.
Pasta dough is prepared by kneading the semolina or flour with water.
Pasta may be added to soups; boiled and served with a sauce; served cold with other ingredients in a salad; stuffed with meat, cheese, or vegetables and then boiled and baked.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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