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Encyclopedia > Passenger vehicles in the United States

This article adopts the US Department of Transportation definition of passenger vehicle to mean cars and trucks used for passengers; the term here excludes buses and trains.

The neutrality of this article is disputed.
Please see the discussion on the talk page.
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The United States is home to the largest passenger vehicle market of any country,[1] which is a consequence of the fact that it has the largest Gross Domestic Product of any country in the world.[2] Overall, there were an estimated 243,023,485 registered passenger vehicles in the United States according to a 2004 DOT study.[3] This number, along with the average age of vehicles, has increased steadily since 1960, indicating a growing number of vehicles per capita. The United States is also home to three of the world's largest vehicle manufacturers, which are commonly referred to as the "Big Three." The motor car has become an integral part of American life, with vehicles outnumbering licensed drivers. American cars are garbage.[3] Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Shortcut: WP:NPOVD Articles that have been linked to this page are the subject of an NPOV dispute (NPOV stands for Neutral Point Of View; see below). ... Nominal GDP per person (capita) in 2006. ...

Contents

Statistics

A typical American car dealership in Fremont, California. Between 2002 and 2003 alone the number of vehicles in the United States increased by three million.
A typical American car dealership in Fremont, California. Between 2002 and 2003 alone the number of vehicles in the United States increased by three million.

The United States Department of Transportation's Federal Highway Administration as well as the National Automobile Dealers Association have published data in regard to the total number of vehicles, growth trends, and ratios between licensed drivers, the general population, and the increasing number of vehicles on American roads. Overall passenger vehicles have been outnumbering licensed drivers since 1972 at an ever increasing rate, while light trucks and vehicles manufactured by foreign marques have gained a larger share of the automotive market in the United States. In 2001, 90% of Americans drove to work in cars.[4] New York City is the only locality in the country where more than half of all households do not own a car (the figure is even higher in Manhattan, over 75%; nationally, the rate is 8%).[4] Image File history File links Toyotadealership. ... Image File history File links Toyotadealership. ... The United States Department of Transportation (DOT) is a federal Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with transportation. ... The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the United States Department of Transportation that specializes in highway transportation. ... National Automobile Dealers Association 8400 Westpark Drive McLean, VA 22102 (703) 821-7000 or (800) 252-6232 nadainfo@nada. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ...


Total number of vehicles

According to the US Bureau of Transit Statistics there are 243,023,485 registered passenger vehicles in the US. Out of these roughly 243 million vehicles, 136,430,651 (56.13%) were classified as cars, while 91,845,327 (37.79%) were classified as "Other 2 axle, 4 tire vehicles," presumably SUVs and pick-up trucks. Yet another 6,161,028 (2.53%) were classified as vehicles with 2 axles and 6 tires and 2,010,335 (0.82%) were classified as "Truck, combination." There were approximately 5,780,870 motorcycles in the US in 2004, which accounts for 2.37% of all registered passenger vehicles. A division of the United States Department of Transportations Federal Highway Administration, which generates and published Transport related statistics. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... Pickup truck with extended cabin and homebuilt lumber rack. ...


According to cumulative data[1] by the Federal Highway Administration (FHA) the number of motor vehicles has also increased steadily since 1960, only stagnating once in 1997 and declining from 1990 to 1991. Otherwise the number of motor vehicles has been rising by an estimated 3.69 million each year since 1960 with the largest annual growth between 1998 and 1999 as well as between 2000 and 2001 when the number of motor vehicles in the United States increased by eight million.[1] Since the study by the FHA the number of vehicles has increased by approximately eleven million, one of the largest recorded increases. The largest percentage increase was between the years of 1972 and 1973 when the number of cars increased by 5.88%. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the United States Department of Transportation that specializes in highway transportation. ...


Vehicle and population ratios since 1960

Year Population Drivers Motor
vehicles
Increase
in vehicles
% Growth
1960 180 87 74 N/A N/A
1961 183 89 76 2 +2.72
1962 186 91 79 2 +2.63
1963 188 94 83 3 +3.79
1964 191 95 86 3 +3.61
1965 194 99 90 4 +4.65
1966 196 101 94 4 +4.44
1967 197 103 97 3 +3.19
1968 199 105 101 4 +4.12
1969 201 108 105 4 +3.96
1970 204 112 108 3 +2.85
1971 207 114 113 5 +4.62
1972 209 118 119 6 +5.30
1973 211 122 126 7 +5.88
1974 213 125 130 4 +3.17
1975 215 130 133 3 +2.30
1976 218 134 139 6 +4.51
1977 220 138 142 3 +2.15
1978 222 141 148 6 +4.22
1979 225 143 152 4 +2.70
1980 227 145 156 4 +2.63
1981 230 147 158 2 +1.28
1982 232 150 160 2 +1.26
1983 234 154 164 4 +2.50
1984 236 155 166 2 +1.21
1985 239 157 172 6 +3.61
1986 241 159 176 4 +2.32
1987 243 161 179 3 +1.70
1988 246 163 184 5 +2.79
1989 248 166 187 3 +1.63
1990 248 167 189 2 +1.01
1991 252 169 188 -1 -0.52
1992 255 173 190 2 +1.06
1993 258 173 194 4 +2.10
1994 260 175 198 4 +2.06
1995 263 177 202 4 +2.02
1996 265 180 206 4 +1.98
1997 268 183 208 4 +1.94
1998 270 185 208 0 +/-0
1999 273 187 216 8 +3.84
2000 281 191 218 2 +0.92
2001 281 191 226 8 +3.66
2002 288 195 230 4 +1.76
2003 291 196 231 1 +0.43
All numbers in millions;
SOURCE: US Department of Transportation

Since 1960, the number of passenger vehicles has steadily risen, and since 1972 has exceeded the number of licensed drivers. Considering the population in the United States of 293,655,404 during the 2004 economic survey,[5] there is one passenger vehicles for every 1.20 persons in the United States, meaning that there are 833.34 passenger vehicles for every 1,000 Americans. According to the Federal Highway Administration there were an estimated 196 million licensed drivers in the United States in the year 2003. Considering the slightly lower number of motor vehicles for 2003, there were an estimated 1.17 motor vehicles per licensed driver, meaning that there are more vehicles than drivers in the US, with vehicles outnumbering drivers 1.2 to one. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the United States Department of Transportation that specializes in highway transportation. ...


The number of motor vehicles in the US has risen by 157 million (212.16%) since 1960, while the population of licensed drivers grew by 109 million (125.28%). Between 1971 and 1972, the number of motor vehicles in the US increased by four million, a record at the time. Since then, the gap between the number of cars and drivers has continuously risen. While in 1972 there were only one million more motor vehicles than drivers, cars outnumber drivers by 35 million in 2003. This means that while there were 0.84% more motor vehicles than drivers in 1972, there are now 17.85% more vehicles than drivers.[1]


Age of vehicles in operation

In the year 2001, the National Automobile Dealers Association conducted a study revealing the average age of vehicles in operation in the US. The study found that of vehicles in operation in the US, 38.3% were older than ten years, 22.3% were between seven and ten years old, 25.8% were between three and six years old and 13.5% were less than two years old. According to this study the majority of vehicles, 60.6%, of vehicles were older than seven years in 2001.[6] This relatively high age of automobiles in the US might be explained through gradually declining sales figures since 1998.[7] National Automobile Dealers Association 8400 Westpark Drive McLean, VA 22102 (703) 821-7000 or (800) 252-6232 nadainfo@nada. ...


The median and mean age of automobiles has steadily increased since 1969. In 2005 the overall median age for automobiles was 8.9 years, a significant increase over 1990 when the median age of vehicles in operation in the US was 6.5 years and 1969 when the mean age for automobiles was 5.1 years.[8] Of all body styles, pick-up trucks had the highest mean age (9.4 years), followed by cars with a mean age of 8.4 years and van with a mean age of 7.0 years. As SUVs are part of a relatively new consumer trend originating mostly in the 1990s, SUVs had the lowest mean age of any body style in the US (6.1 years). The average recreational vehicle was even older with a mean age of 12.5. The mean age has increased continuously for all body styles from 1969 to 2005.[8]


Sales

In the year 2004, 7,505,932 passengers cars were sold in the United States[7] according to the US Department of Transportation. This figure “Includes domestic and imported vehicles." (Department of Transportation) The number of vehicles sold in the US has been decreasing at a gradual yet continuous rate since 1999, when nearly 8.7 million vehicles were sold in the US. Looking back at history however, reveals that such decline is only part of normal market trends and most likely only a temporary affair. Overall, 1985 was a record year with cars sales totaling just over eleven million.[7] While imports have been gaining ground in terms of units sold during the 2000s and have regained roughly the same market share they held in 1992, the sales of domestic vehicles are still more than double those of imported vehicles. It should be noted however that the US Bureau of Transportation Statistics "Includes cars produced in Canada and Mexico" as domestic vehicles as both countries are part of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). In 2004 the sales of vehicles made in NAFTA states totaled 5.4 million, while the sale of imported vehicles totaled 2.1 million. 798,000 vehicles were imported from Japan, making it the greatest exporter of vehicles to the US. Germany was the second largest exporter of vehicles to the US, with 542,000 units exported to the US in 2004. Imports from all other nations, except Germany and Japan, totaled 809,000.[9] The United States Department of Transportation (DOT) is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with transport. ... Secretariats Mexico City, Ottawa and Washington, D.C. Official languages English, French and Spanish Membership Canada, Mexico and the United States Establishment  -  Formation 1 January 1994  Website http://www. ...


Pricing

Full-size SUVs such as the Chevrolet Suburban had an average sticker price of $42k, but were sold for an average 22% discount, bringing the net price down to $33k. Overall, large non-luxury SUVs featured the largest discounts in the SUV segment (Edmunds.com).
Full-size SUVs such as the Chevrolet Suburban had an average sticker price of $42k, but were sold for an average 22% discount, bringing the net price down to $33k. Overall, large non-luxury SUVs featured the largest discounts in the SUV segment (Edmunds.com).

In July 2004, Edmunds.com published a report stating that the average sticker price on a vehicle sold in the United States was $29,746.[10] However, in the US, passenger vehicles are commonly sold at considerable discounts and customers rarely pay the sticker price or MSRP (Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price).[10] The discount is commonly determined by the company's marketing strategies and tends to be larger the slower selling a vehicle is. Due to what many American consumers have perceived as a declining quality among the automobiles manufactured by the "Big Three" and large fixed labor and capital costs, discounts tend to be larger on domestic vehicles. In 2003 the average discount on a domestic vehicle was 20.6% below MSRP. For Japanese and Korean vehicles the average discount was 10% and 12.8%. The lowest discounts were given on vehicles from European manufacturers, where the average discount was 7.7% below MSRP.[11] Overall, the average discount in July 2004 was $4,982 (16.8%), meaning that while the average MSRP was almost $30,000, the average buyer of a new car paid only $24,764.[10] Dr. Jane Liu, the Vice President of Data Analysis for Edmunds.com further stated that, "New models are being introduced at higher price points, but the competitiveness of the market is dramatically pushing down net prices, resulting in a record average discount." The lowest discounts among all car segments were given on luxury SUVs, where buyers received an average 10% discount, resulting in a $43,725 net price, versus the sticker price of $48,586.[10] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x577, 116 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chevrolet Suburban Passenger vehicles in the United States Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x577, 116 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chevrolet Suburban Passenger vehicles in the United States Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Edmunds. ... Edmunds. ... MSRP stands for Manufacturers Suggested Retail Price. Under earlier U.S. state Fair Trade statutes, the manufacturer was able to impose a fixed price for items. ... The (manufacturers) suggested retail price (MSRP or SRP), list price or recommended retail price (RRP) (originally, Monroney suggested retail price) of a product is the price the manufacturer recommends that the retailer sell it for. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Fuel economy

A Hummer H2, with an estimated fuel economy of 9 miles a gallon, is often used by environmental protection groups to raise awareness over the abysmal fuel economy in many of today's light trucks.
A Hummer H2, with an estimated fuel economy of 9 miles a gallon, is often used by environmental protection groups to raise awareness over the abysmal fuel economy in many of today's light trucks.
A Toyota Prius Hybrid, features a fuel economy of 55 miles a gallon (45% above national average). It was recently named the most fuel efficient vehicle in the United States by the Sierra Club and has been used by environmentalists and celebrities to make a statement in favor of more fuel efficient vehicles.
A Toyota Prius Hybrid, features a fuel economy of 55 miles a gallon (45% above national average). It was recently named the most fuel efficient vehicle in the United States by the Sierra Club and has been used by environmentalists and celebrities to make a statement in favor of more fuel efficient vehicles.

The American automobile industry became notorious for the manufacture of gas guzzlers during the 1960s and 1970s when fuel prices and consumer awareness concerning fuel economy were at an all-time low. In the 1960s and 1970s, American-made cars took on enormous proportions as consumers placed their emphasis on comfort, power and style. Large sedans from this era came to be known as land yachts, often rivaling today's largest pick-up trucks in terms of length and width. In 1977, the Lincoln Continental Mark V was reviewed by the German automobile magazine, auto motor und sport and still holds the record for the worst fuel economy of any vehicle ever tested by the magazine with an average of seven miles to the gallon. Photo of a Hummer H2 taken by User:Minesweeper on March 3, 2004 and released into the public domain. ... Photo of a Hummer H2 taken by User:Minesweeper on March 3, 2004 and released into the public domain. ... The H2 SUV/SUT/Hydrogen is the second vehicle sold under the Hummer marque of General Motors. ... 2004 Toyota Prius File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... 2004 Toyota Prius File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Hybrid Synergy Drive The Toyota Prius is one of the first mass-produced and marketed hybrid electric vehicles. ... A Gas-guzzler commonly refers to a vehicle that gets poor fuel economy. ... Fuel efficiency, sometimes also referred to as fuel economy and commonly gas mileage in the United States, is a numeric measure often used to describe the amount of fuel consumed with regard to the distance travelled in a transportation vehicle, such as an automobile. ... A 1976 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham, one of the largest passenger cars ever mass-manufactured in the United States. ... Categories: Stub | Lincoln vehicles ...


Following the oil crisis of the early 1970s, however, smaller vehicles, often imported from Japan, became more and more popular with the American public as these vehicles featured better fuel economy ratings. In the late 1970s, the US government passed minimum fuel economy standards and in the 1980s American automobile manufacturers drastically downsized their cars, only a few vehicles, such as those using the Ford Panther platform retained their over-sized glory. The downsizing did, however, backfire in some cases. After downsizing nearly the entire Cadillac line-up in the late 1980s, General Motors scrambled to save its most prestigious marques. Many American manufacturers again increased the size of their vehicles in the 1990s, while better technology allowed for better fuel economy ratings among sedans. Oil crisis may refer to: 1973 oil crisis 1979 energy crisis 1990 spike in the price of oil Oil price increases of 2004 and 2005 Hubbert peak theory Energy crisis This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... The Panther platform is Ford Motor Companys large, rear wheel drive sedan automobile platform. ... For other uses, see Cadillac (disambiguation). ... General Motors Corporation, also known as GM, is the worlds largest auto company by annual production volume as of 2006, and the second largest by sales volume as of the first half of 2007, behind Toyota Motor Corporation. ...


According to the United States Department of Transportation, the average motor vehicle, including light trucks, in the US had a fuel economy rating of 17.1 miles a gallon or 13.8 liters per 100 kilometers. The average fuel economy for passenger vehicles in the United States has remained stagnant throughout the 1990s and 2000s, peaking in 2001 and 2004. Overall, the past decade has seen the slowest increase in fuel economy since 1960, with fuel economy increasing from 16.4 miles a gallon in 1990 to 17.1 miles a gallon today. This is in contrast to the 1980s when the average fuel economy improved somewhat more significantly from 13.3 miles a gallon in 1980 to 16.4 miles a gallon in 1990.[12] The lackluster increase in fuel economy during the 1990s is largely due to the rising popularity of Sport Utility Vehicles (SUVs), whose status as light trucks gains them exception from the fuel economy restrictions placed on sedans and other cars.[13] According to the Sierra Club "In 1997 all three US automakers violated CAFE standards for light trucks." The Sierra Club is one of many environmental organizations who warn of the low fuel economy of SUV and hold these vehicles largely responsible for the low average fuel economy of vehicles in the United States.[14] This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... The Sierra Club is an American environmental organization founded on May 28, 1892 in San Francisco, California by the well-known preservationist John Muir, who became its first president. ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ...

Average fuel economy in miles per gallon according to the US Department of Transportation.[12]
MPG 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
12.4 12.5 12.0 12.2 13.3 14.6 16.4 16.9 16.9 16.7 16.7 16.8 16.9 17.0 16.9 16.7 16.9 17.1 16.9 17.0 17.1

Body style and size

Mainstream mid-size sedans such as the Toyota Camry or Ford Taurus are often perceived to be the typical and most common body style in the United States. While mid-size sedans are indeed among the country's best selling vehicles, pick-up trucks and SUV's currently hold the top positions, rivaling sedans in the terms of total numbers sold. In the year 2000, the best selling models were the Ford F-150 with 876,716 units sold, Chevrolet Silverado with 645,150 units sold, and the Ford Explorer with 445,157 units sold. The Toyota Camry, Honda Accord, and Ford Taurus held the next three positions as the best selling cars.[15] The Toyota Camry is a mid-size sedan assembled by Toyota in Georgetown, Kentucky; Altona, Victoria, Australia; Guangzhou, China and the original factory in Toyota City, Japan. ... The Ford Taurus is a mid-size, front wheel drive car manufactured by the Ford Motor Company in North America. ... The F-Series is a series of full-size pickup trucks from Ford Motor Company sold for over 5 decades. ... The Chevrolet Silverado from Chevrolet (along with its GMC counterpart, the GMC Sierra), is the latest line of full-size pickup trucks from General Motors. ... The Ford Explorer is a mid-size sport utility vehicle sold in North America and built by the Ford Motor Company since 1990. ... The Honda Accord is an intermediate automobile manufactured by Honda since 1976. ...


Manufacturing

The Mercury Milan, despite being manufactured in Mexico, is still considered a domestic vehicle.
The Mercury Milan, despite being manufactured in Mexico, is still considered a domestic vehicle.
The Saab 9-7X, despite being manufactured in the US by GM, is still considered an import vehicle.
The Saab 9-7X, despite being manufactured in the US by GM, is still considered an import vehicle.

The US was the largest producer of vehicles in the world in 2003, followed by Japan and Germany. While most vehicles sold in the US were manufactured by the Big Three, foreign corporations such as Japan's Toyota Motor Company have starting manufacturing in the US and are now an integrated part of the US automobile industry. According to many sources, the extended US operations of foreign based companies now rival those of American automobile manufacturers. For example, Toyota Motor Company now operates twelve manufacturing plants in the US, producing 1.55 million vehicles, 61.66% of the roughly 2.5 million vehicles the company sells in the US each year.[16] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Lincoln Town Car is a rear wheel drive full-size luxury sedan and serves as the flagship of Fords Lincoln luxury car division. ... The Lincoln Continental, an automobile produced by the Lincoln division of Ford Motor Company, began for the 1939 model year. ... “Ford” redirects here. ... A Lincoln Town Car and Continental being manufactured inside the Wixom Assembly Plant in 2001 The Wixom, Michigan auto plant is one of Fords largest and oldest manufacturing sites. ... Wixom is a city in Oakland County in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... 2006 Mercury Milan authorized artist sketch This is a Ford Motor Company promotional image retrieved from http://www. ... 2006 Mercury Milan authorized artist sketch This is a Ford Motor Company promotional image retrieved from http://www. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Mercury Milan The Mercury Milan is a front-wheel drive mid-size sedan based on the Ford CD3 platform built by Ford Motor Company and distributed by the Lincoln-Mercury division. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 543 pixelsFull resolution (2028 × 1377 pixel, file size: 419 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 543 pixelsFull resolution (2028 × 1377 pixel, file size: 419 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Interior of the 2006 Saab 9-7X showing the Saab-style dashboard, cupholder, and ignition key location The Saab 9-7X is a Saab-branded midsize SUV based on General Motors GM GMT platform, which also includes the Chevrolet TrailBlazer (and for this the 9-7X has been given the... Toyota Motor Corporation (in Japanese: トヨタ自動車株式会社; Toyota Jidōsha Kabushikigaisha; TYO: 7203. ...


A wide variety of vehicles are manufactured in the United States, from compacts to full-size luxury vehicles.[17] The American automobile industry itself is probably best known for the manufacture of large cars, leading to the common public perception of American cars being larger than those from other countries and making the US well known for the production of so called land yachts. Currently, light trucks (including SUVs) of all sizes and full-sized sedans constitute the majority of vehicles made by workers of the United Auto Workers union (UAW).[17] The Lincoln Town Car is currently the most expensive and largest car made in the US by an American manufacturer,[18] while the Cadillac Escalade ESV Platinum is the most expensive SUV (This title used to held by the Hummer H1 until it was cancelled in May 2006).[19] The largest passenger vehicle currently produced in the United States is the Dodge Ram Extended Cab.[20] Rambler American Compact car is a largely North American term denoting an automobile smaller than a midsize car, but larger than a subcompact car. ... 2001 BMW 750iL The Ford Falcon, a popular Australian full-size car A full-size car is a marketing term used in North America for an automobile larger than a mid-size car. ... A 2002 Lincoln Town Car, an example of a flagship luxury sedan A luxury vehicle is a vehicle which provides a great abundance of ease and comfort. ... The United Auto Workers (UAW), headquartered in Detroit, Michigan, officially the United Automobile, Aerospace & Agricultural Implement Workers of America International Union, is one of the largest labor unions in North America, with more than 500,000 members in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico organized into approximately 950 union... The Lincoln Town Car is a rear wheel drive full-size luxury sedan and serves as the flagship of Fords Lincoln luxury car division. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Hummer H1 Alpha is a civilian vehicle based on the M998 High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV), popularly known as the Humvee, which was created by AM General. ... See also Dodge Ram 50, an unrelated Mitsubishi-produced truck The Ram is a full-size pickup truck from DaimlerChryslers Dodge brand. ...


Domestic vehicles

While the denotation of domestic vehicle includes all vehicles made in the United States, the term "Domestic vehicle" in the United States is usually only applied to vehicles made by the "Big Three" and their traditional marques.[21] The term domestic vehicle does not include vehicles sold under marques who used to be headquartered outside the United States and are now owned by the Ford Motor Company or General Motors. Ironically, vehicles made outside the US by the traditional marques of the "Big Three" are considered to be domestic vehicles, while vehicles made inside the US by foreign manufacturers are not considered domestic, but rather import vehicles.[21] Another contradiction is regarding DaimlerChrysler. All four marques, Mercedes-Benz, Chrysler, Dodge, and Jeep are wholly owned by DaimlerChrysler, yet Mercedes-Benz vehicles are considered import vehicles, while vehicles by the Chrysler Group are considered domestic vehicles. “Ford” redirects here. ... DaimlerChrysler AG (ISIN: DE0007100000) is a German car corporation and the worlds eighth largest car manufacturer. ... This page is about the Mercedes-Benz brand of automobiles and trucks from the DaimlerChrysler automobile manufacturer. ... For other uses, including the Chrysler Brand, see Chrysler (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Jeep (disambiguation). ...

The Mercedes-Benz R-Class is one of many vehicles that is marketed as an import vehicle due to the national origin of its manufacturer, yet is manufactured in the United States.
The Mercedes-Benz R-Class is one of many vehicles that is marketed as an import vehicle due to the national origin of its manufacturer, yet is manufactured in the United States.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 602 KB) Summary Author: Marian Gladis Košice, Slovakia Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 602 KB) Summary Author: Marian Gladis Košice, Slovakia Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Mercedes-Benz R-Class Mercedes-Benz R-Class The R-Class is an MPV/SUV crossover automobile offered by DaimlerChrysler in 2006 model year under the Mercedes-Benz brand. ...

Import vehicles

As with the term domestic vehicles, there is a legal definition for "import vehicles" but popular usage of the term, and popular views of what constitutes an "import" vehicle, vary widely.


For the purposes of Federal regulations, such as Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) and the American Automobile Labeling Act of 1994 (AALA) [2], vehicles produced in the United States, regardless of brand, are considered "domestic", while vehicles produced outside the United States are considered "imported". The Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) regulations in the United States, first enacted by Congress in 1975,[1] are federal regulations intended to improve the average fuel economy of cars and light trucks (trucks, vans and sport utility vehicles) sold in the US in the wake of the 1973 Arab...


However, many Americans view a Toyota vehicle made in Kentucky, or a Mercedes-Benz vehicle made in Alabama as an "import", while others view a Pontiac vehicle made in Australia as a "domestic" vehicle. This perception is due to the respective brands' longstanding association with their parent companies: Toyota with Japan, Mercedes-Benz with Germany and Pontiac with the United States. This article is about the automaker. ... This page is about the Mercedes-Benz brand of automobiles and trucks from the DaimlerChrysler automobile manufacturer. ... Pontiac is a marque of automobile produced by General Motors and sold in the United States, Canada and Mexico from 1926 to the present. ...


The country of origin of any particular vehicle can be easily determined:

  • The AALA requires that passenger vehicles manufactured after October 1, 1994 must have labels specifying their percentage value of U.S./Canadian parts content, the country of assembly, and countries of origin of the engine and transmission. These are typically part of, or adjacent, to the vehicle's Monroney Label.
  • Each vehicle sold in the United States carries a Vehicle Identification Number, as required by NHTSA regulation -- Title 49, Part 565 of the U.S. Code.[22] The VIN identifies the vehicle's country of manufacture, and the company responsible for its production. Vehicles manufactured in the United States have VINs beginning with the numbers 1, 4, and 5 -- regardless of whether the car's parent company is based in the United States or not. Thus, a Toyota Camry made in the U.S. will have a 1, 4 or 5 at the start of its VIN, while one imported from Japan will begin with the letter J.
Related Article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VIN#World_Manufacturer_Identifier

In the year 2000, according to an article in the magazine Motor BMW attempted to label its "X5" Sport Utility Vehicle, made in Spartanburg, South Carolina with a VIN beginning with the letter W -- indicating the vehicle was made in Germany. A spokesman for the Society of Automotive Engineers, the agency responsible for assigning the three-digit "World Manufacturer Identifier" that begins the VIN label, was quoted as saying "We assign (codes) according to the dirt the plant's built on, not the headquarters of the company."[23] Window Sticker for a 2006 Volkswagen Jetta In the United States, all new automobiles are required to include an official form listing certain information about the car; this window sticker is commonly called a Monroney sticker in the industry (or simply a window sticker), named after Almer Stillwell Mike Monroney... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The United States Code (U.S.C.) is the general and permanent federal Law of the United States. ... The BMW X5 is a mid-size luxury crossover SUV sold by BMW since 2000. ... A fourth-generation (2006-) Ford Explorer, the best-selling mid-size SUV in the United States. ... Spartanburg is the largest city and the county seat of Spartanburg CountyGR6 in South Carolina, and is the second-largest city of the three primary cities in the Upstate region of South Carolina. ... The Society of Automotive Engineers is a professional organisation and standards body for the engineering of powered vehicles of all kinds - cars, trucks, boats, aircraft and more. ...


The Big Three

"The Big Three" refers to the three largest automobile manufacturers headquartered in the United States. While there have been roughly 1,800 car manufacturers in the US over the course of the 20th century, only three large corporations with considerable sales numbers were left by the 1980s. The terms is applied to General Motors, the Ford Motor Company, and the Chrysler Corporation (now Chrysler Group within Daimler-Chrysler). For other uses, including the Chrysler Brand, see Chrysler (disambiguation). ... The Chrysler Corporation is a United States-based automobile manufacturer, which merged in 1998 with Daimler-Benz to become DaimlerChrysler. ...


General Motors

The Renaissance Center in downtown Detroit serves as the global headquarters of General Motors.
The Renaissance Center in downtown Detroit serves as the global headquarters of General Motors.
See General Motors for a complete overview of the corporation

General Motors is the largest automobile manufacturer in the United States and the world. GM is headquartered at the Renaissance Center in downtown Detroit, employs approximately 327,000 people, sold 9.17 million cars world-wide, and had a $192.6 billion revenue for the year 2005. The corporation sells its vehicles in the United States under the following divisions and subsidiaries:[24] Download high resolution version (2100x1510, 499 KB) From http://cgvi. ... Download high resolution version (2100x1510, 499 KB) From http://cgvi. ... The Renaissance Center, nicknamed the RenCen, is a group of seven interconnected skyscrapers in Detroit, Michigan, and the tallest building in Michigan since 1977. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... General Motors Corporation, also known as GM, is the worlds largest auto company by annual production volume as of 2006, and the second largest by sales volume as of the first half of 2007, behind Toyota Motor Corporation. ... GM logo This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... The Renaissance Center, nicknamed the RenCen, is a group of seven interconnected skyscrapers in Detroit, Michigan, and the tallest building in Michigan since 1977. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor...

Buick is a brand of automobile built in the United States, Canada, China and in Spain by General Motors Corporation. ... For other uses, see Cadillac (disambiguation). ... Chevrolet (IPA: ʃɛv. ... The initialism GMC can mean either: GMC, a division of General Motors formerly named GMC Truck Game Maker Community, a game making utility forum. ... Hummer is a brand of sport utility vehicles (SUVs) sold by General Motors, also known as GM. They are based on the military High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle, or Humvee. ... Pontiac is a marque of automobile produced by General Motors and sold in the United States, Canada and Mexico from 1926 to the present. ... For other uses, see Saab (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Ford Motor Company

A Ford assembly line in 1913, ten years after the company was founded in 1903.
See Ford Motor Company for a complete overview of the corporation

The Ford Motor Company (FoMoCo) was founded in 1904 by Henry Ford, and is America's second largest and the world's third largest vehicle manufacturer according to total sales volume. In 2005, the Ford Motor Company had a total revenue of $178.1 billion. The corporation sells vehicles under the following brand names and subsidiaries:[25] Ford assembly line 1913 (from NARA) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Ford assembly line 1913 (from NARA) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... “Ford” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Ford_Motor_Company_Logo. ... Henry Ford (1919) Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was the founder of the Ford Motor Company and father of modern assembly lines used in mass production. ...

Aston Martin Lagonda Limited is a manufacturer of luxury performance cars, whose headquarters are at Gaydon, Warwickshire, England in the United Kingdom. ... Ford may mean a number of things: A ford is a river crossing. ... Jaguar Cars Limited is a luxury car manufacturer, originally with headquarters in Browns Lane, Coventry, England but now at Whitley, Coventry. ... Daimler has, since 1896, been the motor car marque of the British Daimler Motor Company, based in Coventry. ... Land Rover was the name of one of the first British civilian all-terrain utility vehicles, first produced by Rover in 1947. ... Lincoln is an American luxury automobile brand, operated under the Ford Motor Company. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Controlling interest is to have control of a large enough portion of voting stock in a company such that no other stock holder can oppose you. ... Mercury is an automobile marque of the Ford Motor Company founded in 1939 to market near-luxury cars slotted between entry-level Ford and luxury Lincoln models, similar to General Motors Buick (and former Oldsmobile) brand and Chryslers Chrysler brand. ... Volvo Cars, or Volvo Personvagnar, is a well-known Swedish automobile maker founded in 1927 in the city of Gothenburg in Sweden. ...

Chrysler Group, DaimlerChrysler Corporation

The Chrysler 300 has become one of the best selling American sedans and has marked Chrysler's revival, according to many critics.
The Chrysler 300 has become one of the best selling American sedans and has marked Chrysler's revival, according to many critics.
See Chrysler and DaimlerChrysler for more detailed description

Formed in 1925 by Walter Percy Chrysler, the Chrysler Corporation has since been one of the most important American automobile manufacturers, consistently ranking as the third-biggest for most of the post-war period. 2005 Chrysler 300C Photographed in Stamford, CT This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... 2005 Chrysler 300C Photographed in Stamford, CT This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Chrysler 300 is a full-size near-luxury car designed by Ralph Gilles. ... For other uses, including the Chrysler Brand, see Chrysler (disambiguation). ... DaimlerChrysler AG (ISIN: DE0007100000) is a German car corporation and the worlds eighth largest car manufacturer. ... Chrysler Logo, claiming fair use This work is copyrighted. ... Walter Percy Chrysler (April 2, 1875 - August 18, 1940) was an American automobile pioneer. ...


In 1998, the Chrysler Corporation officially merged with Daimler-Benz of Germany, into a new entity, DaimlerChrysler (DCX), which is headquartered both in Stuttgart, Germany and Auburn Hills, Michigan (where the pre-merger headquarters of DaimlerBenz and Chrysler, respectively, were located). This raised a dispute on whether Chrysler (or, more specifically, the Chrysler Group within DCX, which consists of most former Chrysler Corporation operations and is headquartered in Auburn Hills) can still be seen as a domestic manufacturer. Nevertheless, the term "Big Three" is still applied. The merger also sparked some controversy as to the nature of the transaction, which is discussed in the DaimlerChrysler article. Daimler-Benz AG was founded on May 1, 1924 by the merger of Benz & Cie. ... , City Center seen from Weinsteige Road Castle Solitude The 1956 TV Tower The Weissenhof Estate in 1927 Stuttgart (IPA: []) is the capital of the state of Baden-Württemberg in southern Germany. ... Auburn Hills is a city in Oakland County in the U.S. state of Michigan. ...


In 2005, the Chrysler Group employed 83,130 people and sold 2.83 million vehicles globally, generating $57.4 billion in revenue. The Chrysler Group manufactures and sells vehicles under the following brands:[27]

For other uses, including the Chrysler Brand, see Chrysler (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Jeep (disambiguation). ...

Other automakers with manufacturing operations in United States

The best-selling passenger car in the United States is not one from the Big Three, but the Toyota Camry, although it is also manufactured in the US

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1712, 1917 KB) Summary This picture was taken by me on January 4, 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1712, 1917 KB) Summary This picture was taken by me on January 4, 2005. ...

BMW

See BMW AG for a complete overview of the corporation

BMW opened its American manufacturing plant in Spartanburg, South Carolina in 1994, to manufacture the Z3 roadster, later replaced by the Z4 model. Since 2000, the plant also manufactures the X5 SUV. All those models are made exclusively at Spartanburg for both the domestic market and worldwide exports (not counting CKD operations in some countries). The BMW logo is a circle divided into quadrants of alternating white and light blue colour. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into BMW. (Discuss) BMW Zentrum Spartanburg (visitor center) BMW Manufacturing Co. ... Spartanburg is the largest city and the county seat of Spartanburg CountyGR6 in South Carolina, and is the second-largest city of the three primary cities in the Upstate region of South Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... The BMW Z3 was the first modern mass-market roadster produced by BMW, as well as the first BMW model assembled in the United States. ... The BMW Z4 is a rear-wheel drive sports car by the German automaker BMW, known as the E85 in roadster form and E86 in coupe form. ... The BMW X5 is a mid-size luxury crossover SUV sold by BMW since 2000. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Honda

See Honda for a complete overview of the corporation

Honda was the first Japanese automaker to build a factory in the United States. Following the success of the Accord, the company opened a new plant in Marysville, Ohio in 1982 to assemble the model, which went on to become the most popular car in the US in 1989. Honda expanded their operations and the scope of models manufactured in the US, building the Anna engine plant and East Liberty automobile assembly plant, and in 2001 opening Honda Manufacturing of Alabama in Lincoln. Almost all models sold under the Honda and Acura brands in North America are currently manufactured in either the USA or Canada, and a few vehicles are exported to other continents. The logo of the Honda automobiles The logo of the Honda motorcycles Honda Motor Company, Limited )   (TYO: 7267 , NYSE: HMC), or simply called Honda, is a Japanese multinational corporation, engine manufacturer and engineering corporation. ... Marysville is a city in Union County, Ohio, United States. ... Anna is a village located in Shelby County, Ohio. ... East Liberty is an unincorporated community located in Logan County, Ohio, to the east of Bellefontaine. ... Honda Manufacturing of Alabama is an automobile manufacturer in Lincoln, Alabama. ... Lincoln is a city in Talladega County, Alabama, United States. ... Acura (アキュラ Akyura) is a luxury brand of Japanese automaker Honda Motor Company. ...


Hyundai

See Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama for more detailed description

Hyundai Motor Company started manufacturing in the United States in 2005, when their plant in Montgomery, Alabama started the production of the Sonata sedan. It was joined in 2006 by the new Santa Fe SUV. All Hyundais made in Alabama are only sold in North America. Hyundai Motor Manufacturing Alabama (commonly called HMMA) is an automobile factory in Montgomery, Alabama. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Montgomery Incorporated December 3, 1819 Government  - Mayor Bobby Bright Area  - City  156. ... The Hyundai Sonata is a mid-size sedan built by the Hyundai Motor Company. ... Facelifted Hyundai Santa Fe (US) The Hyundai Santa Fe is a mid-size crossover SUV based on the Hyundai Sonata platform. ...


Mercedes-Benz, DaimlerChrysler

See Mercedes-Benz U.S. International for more detailed description

Apart from manufacturing operations within the Chrysler Group and Truck Group, DaimlerChrysler also operates a plant within the Mercedes Car Group. In 1997, a year before the merger, the former Daimler-Benz followed the steps of their Bavarian competitor and opened a plant in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, to serve as a worldwide production location for the new M-Class. The M-Class has since then replaced by a new generation and joined by the new R-Class and GL-Class, also manufactured exclusively in Alabama. Mercedes-Benz U.S. International (MBUSI) is an automobile manufacturing plant in Vance, Alabama near Tuscaloosa. ... Tuscaloosa County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mercedes-Benz R-Class Mercedes-Benz R-Class The R-Class is an MPV/SUV crossover automobile offered by DaimlerChrysler in 2006 model year under the Mercedes-Benz brand. ... DaimlerChrysler offers a series of full-size luxury crossover SUVs to the public under the Mercedes-Benz brand as GL-Class. ...


Mitsubishi Motors Corporation

See Diamond-Star Motors for more detailed description

Mitsubishi Motors entered the American market through a long-standing partnership with Chrysler Corporation, and later this partnership was extended into a 50/50 joint venture manufacturing operation named Diamond-Star Motors (DSM) in Normal, Illinois. In 1991, Mitsubishi took over Chrysler's share in DSM and in 1995 renamed it Mitsubishi Motors North America, Inc. (MMNA) Manufacturing Division. The plant has produced a number of Mitsubishi models and their Chrysler, Dodge, Plymouth and Eagle derivatives, and currently manufactures vehicles based on the American-designed PS platform - the Galant, Eclipse and Endeavor. Manufacturing of related Chrysler-branded vehicles was taken over by Chrysler Group, and while other related Mitsubishi vehicles are sold worldwide, MMNA vehicles are only sold in North America. Diamond-Star Motors (commonly abbreviated to DSM) was an automobile-manufacturing joint venture between the Chrysler Corporation and Mitsubishi Motors Corporation (MMC). ... Mitsubishi Motors Corporation ) is the fifth largest automaker in Japan and the thirteenth largest in the world by unit sales. ... A joint venture (often abbreviated JV) is an entity formed between two or more parties to undertake economic activity together. ... Normal is an incorporated town in McLean County, Illinois, United States. ... Eagle was a marque of automobiles sold in the United States and Canada from 1988 to 1998. ... The PS platform is Mitsubishi Motors midsize car front wheel drive platform. ... The Mitsubishi Galant is an automobile manufactured by Mitsubishi Motors since 1969. ... The Mitsubishi Eclipse is a two-door, four-seat sport compact automobile that has been in production since 1989 for left hand drive markets including the United States, Canada, and Taiwan. ... The Mitsubishi Endeavor is a midsize SUV that is based off of the platform of the North American version of the Mitsubishi Galant. ...


Nissan

See Nissan Motors for a complete overview of the corporation

Nissan opened their first factory in the 1980s in Smyrna, Tennessee, joined in the new millennium by another plant in Canton, Mississippi. Most models sold under the Nissan brand in United States, as well as Infiniti QX56, are currently manufactured there - contrary to Toyota or Honda, the company does not have any manufacturing operation in Canada. Most North American models are specific to this market, although some models, like the Murano and Quest, are exported to other continents. Nissan Motor Co. ... Smyrna is a town in Rutherford County, Tennessee, United States. ... Canton is a city located in Madison County, Mississippi. ... Nissan assembles the QX56, a model of sport utility vehicle, and offers it to the public under the Infiniti brand. ... 2004 Murano SE in black (Front) 2004 Murano SE in black (Back) The Nissan Murano is a near-luxury mid-size crossover SUV manufactured by Nissan Motors which began retail sales in the 2003 model year, originally as the top-of-the-line SUV, which was larger than the Pathfinder... The Nissan Quest is a minivan produced by Nissan Motor Corporation since 1993. ...


Subaru

See Subaru of Indiana Automotive, Inc. for more detailed description

Subaru teamed up with fellow Japanese manufacturer Isuzu, forming a joint-venture called Subaru Isuzu Automotive to build and operate a manufacturing plant in Lafayette, Indiana. The plant made Subaru cars and Isuzu SUVs mostly for the American market until 2003, when Isuzu, facing faltering sales in America, decided to quit the venture selling their share to Subaru for $1. The plant continued to build Isuzu Rodeos under contract until the end of that vehicle's production run. From then on, the production was limited to Subaru models such as Legacy and its derivatives Outback and Baja, as well as the new B9 Tribeca. The two latter models are only built in Indiana for all markets where they are sold. After Toyota acquired a stake in Fuji Heavy Industries, the parent company of Subaru, it announced that it will shift some of the Toyota Camry production to the Lafayette plant. Subaru of Indiana Automotive, Inc. ... This article is about a truck manufacturer. ... Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, USA, 63 miles (101 km) northwest of Indianapolis. ... The Legacy is a mid-size car introduced by the Japanese manufacturer Subaru in February 1989 as a larger, upscale companion to the companys Leone/Loyale and currently serves as the flagship model in the Subaru range. ... See also the smaller Impreza-based Subaru Outback Sport Subaru introduced the all-wheel-drive Outback to the US market in 1994 as a 1995 model, deriving the model almost completely from the Subaru Legacy. ... Formally introduced in 2002 as a 2003 model, the Subaru Baja combined the handling and passenger carrying characteristics of a car, the open-bed versatility of a truck -- and to a lesser degree, the load carrying capacity of a truck. ... The Subaru B9 Tribeca is a five- or seven-seat mid-size, luxury crossover SUV which was launched for the 2006 model year and went on sale in June 2005 in the United States. ... Fuji Heavy Industries, Ltd. ...


Toyota Motor Corporation

See Toyota Motor Manufacturing North America for more detailed description

Toyota's first foray into automobile manufacturing in the United States was NUMMI, a joint venture with General Motors based on the latter's production facility in California, which started in 1984 and has been manufacturing Toyota models and their versions branded as Geo, Chevrolet and Pontiac. Toyota went on to establish a number of wholly owned plants in states such as Kentucky, Indiana, California, West Virginia and Alabama, as well as in Canada. It does not, however, operate a plant in Mexico. Most Toyota vehicles sold in the United States, as well as some Lexus-branded models, come from American plants. Conversely, all Scions are imported from Japan. Toyota Motor Manufacturing North America (TMMNA) is an automobile manufacturing company owned by Toyota Motor Company and located in Erlanger, Kentucky. ... New United Motor Manufacturing, Inc. ... GEO or Geo may refer to any of the following: Geo or gio, is a creek (inlet) or gulley in the Orkney and Shetland Islands GEO (newspaper), a popular scientific magazine Geo (microformat), a microformat for marking up WSG84 geographical coordinates in (X)HTML Geo (automobile), a brand of entry... Lexus is the luxury vehicle division of Japanese automaker Toyota Motor Corporation. ... This article is on the car division of Toyota. ...


See also

The percentage of households and individuals over the age of 25 with incomes exceeding $100,000 in the US.[1][2] Affluence in the United States refers to an individuals or households state of being in an economically favorable position in contrast to a given reference group. ... This article discusses the culture of the United States; for customs and way of life, see Culture of the United States. ... This article serves as an overview of the customs and culture of the United States; for the popular (pop) culture of the United States, see arts and entertainment in the United States. ... This graph shows the educational attainment since 1947. ... Health care in the United States is provided by many separate legal entities. ... Holidays of the United States vary with local observance. ... For information on the income of individuals please see Personal income in the United States This graphic shows the distribution of gross annual household income. ... Single family homes such as this are indicative of the American middle class. ... The human rights record of the United States of America has featured an avowed commitment to the protection of specific personal political, religious and other freedoms. ... This graph shows the household income of the given percentiles from 1967 to 2003, in 2003 dollars. ... Labor unions in the United States today function as legally recognized representatives of workers in numerous industries, but are strongest among public sector employees such as teachers and police. ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens-of-thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... For information on household income please see Household income in the United States Personal income for the populatio age 25 or older. ... Political Compass. ... Percent below each countrys official poverty line, according to the CIA factbook. ... Racism in the United States has been a major issue in America since the colonial era. ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens of thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... Social issues in the United States as perceived by social justice advocates and other groups and commentators include disparities in the educational system, poverty, high rates of crime and incarceration, and lack of access to quality health care, as well as racism and racial segregation. ... The standard of living in the United States is one of the highest in the world by almost any measure. ... Wealth in the United States is commonly measured in terms of net worth which is the sum of all assets, including home equity minus all liabilities. ... // The following data show the automobile manufacturers which produce or have produced automobiles, and some data on their relative sizes. ... The following is a list of the largest passenger vehicles of any global marque currently sold in the United States. ... General Motors Corporation, also known as GM, is the worlds largest auto company by annual production volume as of 2006, and the second largest by sales volume as of the first half of 2007, behind Toyota Motor Corporation. ... “Ford” redirects here. ... DaimlerChrysler AG (ISIN: DE0007100000) is a German car corporation and the worlds eighth largest car manufacturer. ...

US related topics

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... “American history” redirects here. ... This is a timeline of United States history. ... The pre-Columbian era incorporates all period subdivisions in the history and prehistory of the Americas before the appearance of significant European influences on the Americas continent. ... This article is about the colonial history of the United States. ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... // The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies were independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... A government map, probably created in the mid-20th century, that depicts a simplified history of territorial acquistions within the continental United States. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Historically, the civil rights movement was a period of time around the world of approximately one generation (1954–1980) wherein there was much worldwide civil unrest and popular rebellion. ... For a history, see Timeline of United States diplomatic history For the published diplomatic papers, see The Foreign Relations of the United States For Foreign relations under George W. Bush, see Foreign policy of the George W. Bush administration. ... // 2000 282,338,631 2010 309,162,581 2020 336,031,546 2030 363,811,435 2040 392,172,658 2050 420,080,587 2060 450,505,985 2070 480,568,004 2080 511,442,859 2090 540,405,985 2100 571,440,474 The US population in 1900 was... 48-star flag, 1957 This is a survey of the postage stamps and postal history of the United States. ... The United States Constitution, the supreme law of the United States The United States Reports, the official reporter of the Supreme Court of the United States The law of the United States was originally largely derived from the common law of the system of English law, which was in force... Image of the United States Bill of Rights from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. ... Separation of powers is a political doctrine under which the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government are kept distinct, to prevent abuse of power. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ... This is an incomplete list of federal agencies, which are either departmental agencies within the executive branch of the United States government or are Independent Agencies of the United States Government (including regulatory agencies and government corporations). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym... The United States courts of appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... The Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. “Justice Department” redirects here. ... F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ... Logo used on the Intelligence Community web site. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... The Defense Intelligence Agency, or DIA, is a major producer and manager of military intelligence for the United States Department of Defense. ... NSA can stand for: National Security Agency of the USA The British Librarys National Sound Archive This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      This list of political parties in the United States contains past and present political parties in the... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      The United States has a federal government, with elected officials at federal (national), state and... An electoral college is a set of electors, who are empowered as a deliberative body to elect a candidate to a particular office. ... Political Compass. ... This article provides a list of major political scandals of the United States. ... Map of results by state of the 2004 U.S. presidential election, representing states won by the Democrats as blue and those won by the GOP as red. ... J. M. Flaggs 1917 , based on the original British Lord Kitchener poster of three years earlier, was used to recruit soldiers for both World War I and World War II. Flagg used a modified version of his own face for Uncle Sam, and veteran Walter Botts provided the pose. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states, which are... United States territory is any extent of region under the jurisdiction of the federal government of the United States,[1] including all waters[2] (around islands or continental tracts). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the... This is a list of cities in the fifty United States as well as U.S.-owned territories (Puerto Rico, the United States Virgin Islands, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and American Samoa) and the District of Columbia. ... United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ... This list of regions of the United States includes official (governmental) and non-official areas within the borders of the United States, not including U.S. states, the federal district of Washington, D.C. or standard subentities such as cities or counties. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... It has been suggested that Middle Atlantic States be merged into this article or section. ... The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... The Great Plains covers much of the central United States, portions of Canada and Mexico. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The list of mountains of the United States shows the location of mountains in a given state. ... Appalachians in North Carolina The Appalachian Mountains (French: les Appalaches) are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... Rivers in the United States is a list of rivers in the United States. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Colorado River from the bottom of Marble Canyon, in the Upper Grand Canyon Colorado River in the Grand Canyon from Desert View The Colorado River from Laughlin The Colorado River is a river in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, approximately 1,450 mi (2,330 km) long... This is a list of valleys of the United States which includes valleys which lie only partially within the United States: Antelope Valley (California) Austin Hollow (Rhode Island) The Basin (Massachusetts) Bentley Hollow (Massachusetts) Berkshire Valley (Massachusetts) Big Smoky Valley (Nevada) Blackstone Gorge (Rhode Island) Brush Valley (Barnstable County, Massachusetts... This is a list of the extreme points of the United States, the points that are farther north, south, east, or west than any other location in the country. ... The National Park System of the United States is the collection of physical properties owned or administered by the National Park Service. ... Water supply and sanitation in the United States is provided by towns and cities, public utilities that span several jurisdictions and rural cooperatives. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... This is a list of companies from the United States: #Current companies #Former companies, including acquired and merged ones #By industry #By location #See also Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... The Fed redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The standard of living in the United States is one of the highest in the world by almost any measure. ... For information on household income please see Household income in the United States Personal income for the populatio age 25 or older. ... For information on the income of individuals please see Personal income in the United States This graphic shows the distribution of gross annual household income. ... This graph shows the household income of the given percentiles from 1967 to 2003, in 2003 dollars. ... Single family homes such as this are indicative of the American middle class. ... The primary regulator of communications in the United States is the Federal Communications Commission. ... Current U.S. Highway shield The United States Highway System is an integrated system of roads in the United States numbered within a nationwide grid. ... There arergwertwertert[1] Kyle Railroad (KYLE) [2] Missouri and Northern Arkansas Railroad (MNA) [3] Montana Rail Link (MRL) [4] Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway (MMA) [5] Nebraska, Kansas and Colorado RailNet (NKCR) New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway (NYSW) [6] Northern Plains Railroad Paducah and Louisville Railway (PAL) [7] Palouse... The United States of America has a large and lucrative tourism industry serving millions of international and domestic tourists. ... This article very generally discusses the customs and culture of the United States; for the culture of the United States, see arts and entertainment in the United States. ... Population of the United States, 1790 to 2000 The demographics of the United States depict a largely urban nation, with 57 percent of its population living in places more than 100 miles away from the ocean (2003). ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens of thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... For other uses, see American Dream (disambiguation). ... The percentage of households and individuals over the age of 25 with incomes exceeding $100,000 in the US.[1][2] Affluence in the United States refers to an individuals or households state of being in an economically favorable position in contrast to a given reference group. ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens-of-thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... Percent below each countrys official poverty line, according to the CIA factbook. ... This graph shows the educational attainment since 1947. ... Violent conforntation between working class union members and law enforecement such as the one between teamsters and Minneapolis police above were commonly frowned upon by professional middle class. ... Holidays of the United States vary with local observance. ... This article discusses the culture of the United States; for customs and way of life, see Culture of the United States. ... The United States is home to a wide array of regional styles and scenes. ... American classical music refers to music written in the United States but in the European classical music tradition. ... American folk music, also known as Americana, is a broad category of music including Native American music, Bluegrass, country music, gospel, old time music, jug bands, Appalachian folk, blues, Tejano and Cajun. ... The first major American popular songwriter, Stephen Foster Even before the birth of recorded music, American popular music had a profound effect on music across the world. ... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... This article is about television in the United States, specifically its history, art, business and government regulation. ... ... American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ... The folklore of the United States, or American folklore, is the folk tradition which has evolved on the North American continent since Europeans arrived in the 16th century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Transcendentalism was a group of new ideas in literature, religion, culture, and philosophy that emerged in New England in the early-to mid-19th century. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Beat Generation was a group of American writers who came to prominence in the late 1950s and early 1960s. ... The Rocky Mountains, Landers Peak, 1863 by Albert Bierstadt, one of the Hudson River School painters Visual arts of the United States refers to the history of painting and visual art in the United States. ... Jackson Pollock, No. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Closely related to the development of American music in the early 20th century was the emergence of a new, and distinctively American, art form -- modern dance. ... The United States has a history of architecture that includes a wide variety of styles. ... Social issues in the United States as perceived by social justice advocates and other groups and commentators include disparities in the educational system, poverty, high rates of crime and incarceration, and lack of access to quality health care, as well as racism and racial segregation. ... Affirmative action is a policy or a program of giving preferential treatment to certain designated groups allegedly seeking to redress discrimination or bias through active measures, as in education and employment. ... Progress of America, 1875, by Domenico Tojetti American exceptionalism (cf. ... Anti-Americanism, often Anti-American sentiment, is opposition or hostility toward the culture or people of the United States. ... Capital punishment in the United States is officially sanctioned by 38 of the 50 states, as well as by the federal government and the military. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Massive mark-ups for drugs, [http://www. ... 1970s US postage stamp block In the United States today the organized Environmental movement is represented by a wide range of organizations sometimes called Non-Government Organizations or NGOs. ... The human rights record of the United States of America has featured an avowed commitment to the protection of specific personal political, religious and other freedoms. ... The United States–Mexico barrier is actually several separation barriers designed to prevent illegal immigration into the United States from the territory of adjacent Mexico along the U.S.-Mexico border. ... Pornography may use any of a variety of media — written and spoken text, photos, movies, etc. ... Racial profiling, also known as ethnic profiling, is the inclusion of racial or ethnic characteristics in determining whether a person is considered likely to commit a particular type of crime (see Offender Profiling). ... International recognition Civil unions and Domestic partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage, also called gay marriage, is a marriage between two persons... This article or section contains too many quotations for an encyclopedic entry. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Federal Highway Administration, numbers of drivers and motor vehicles since 1960. Retrieved on 2006-06-08.
  2. ^ World Bank list of high income countries. Retrieved on 2006-06-08.
  3. ^ a b Bureau of Transportation, number of vehicles and vehicle classification. Retrieved on 2006-06-08.
  4. ^ a b Highlights of the 2001 National Household Travel Survey, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, U.S. Department of Transportation, accessed May 21, 2006
  5. ^ US Census Bureau with US population and demographics in 2004. Retrieved on 2006-06-08.
  6. ^ NADA report on average age and number of vehicles (PDF file). Retrieved on 2006-06-08.
  7. ^ a b c Number of vehicles sold in the US according to the US Department of Transportation. Retrieved on 2006-06-09.
  8. ^ a b Median age of vehicles. Retrieved on 2006-06-09.
  9. ^ Sales figures according to the US Department of Transportation. Retrieved on 2006-06-09.
  10. ^ a b c d Edmunds.com pricing statistics. Retrieved on 2006-06-09.
  11. ^ Discounts according to the AutoChannel. Retrieved on 2006-06-09.
  12. ^ a b Fuel economy average. Retrieved on 2006-06-09.
  13. ^ Sierra Club fuel economy standard exemptions. Retrieved on 2006-06-09.
  14. ^ Sierra Club on fuel efficiency. Retrieved on 2006-06-09.
  15. ^ Edmunds.com list of best selling vehicles. Retrieved on 2006-06-09.
  16. ^ Toyota in the US. Retrieved on 2006-06-08.
  17. ^ a b UAW report on American made vehicles. Retrieved on 2006-06-08.
  18. ^ Pricing of American luxury sedans. Retrieved on 2006-06-08.
  19. ^ Pricing of American luxury SUVs. Retrieved on 2006-06-08.
  20. ^ Largest American Pick-up trucks. Retrieved on 2006-06-08.
  21. ^ a b AMISOL list of VIN codes and domestic vehicle marques. Retrieved on 2006-06-22.
  22. ^ Information for New Manufacturers of Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Equipment (1999). Retrieved on 2007-07-30.
  23. ^ Lypen, John (2000), "BMW VIN code switch", Motor (Hearst Publications), <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3828/is_200001/ai_n8896097> (retrieved on 2007-07-30.)
  24. ^ GM Company Profile. Retrieved on 2006-06-08.
  25. ^ FoMoCo. Retrieved on 2006-06-08.
  26. ^ Ford Press Release. Retrieved on 2007-04-07.
  27. ^ Chrysler Group - Facts and Figures (official Daimler-Chrysler site). Retrieved on 2006-06-08.

 
 

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