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Encyclopedia > Passed ball

In baseball, a catcher shall be charged with a passed ball when he fails to hold or to control a legally pitched ball which should have been held or controlled with ordinary effort, thereby permitting a runner or runners to advance.


A closely related statistic is the wild pitch. As with many baseball statistics, whether a pitch that gets away from a catcher is a passed ball or wild pitch is at the discretion of the official scorer. If a pitch bounces before reaching the catcher, thereby enabling a runner (or the batter, on strike three) to advance, it will most often be a wild pitch and not a passed ball.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Passed ball - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (349 words)
In baseball, a catcher is charged with a passed ball when he fails to hold or control a legally pitched ball which should have been held or controlled with ordinary effort, thereby permitting a runner or runners to advance or score.
A passed ball may be scored when a runner on first, second, or third base reaches the next base on a bobble or missed catch, or when the batter-runner reaches first base on an uncaught strike three (see also the definition of Strikeout).
A passed ball is not recorded as an error.
Passed ball - BR Bullpen (122 words)
A passed ball is a defensive miscue by the catcher on a pitch that allows a runner to advance at least one base.
A passed ball should not be confused with a wild pitch, where the fault lies with the pitcher.
A pitch is normally called a passed ball when the catcher is able to get his glove on the ball but fails to catch it cleanly.
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