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Encyclopedia > Party switching

In politics, party switching is any change in party affiliation of a partisan public figure, usually one who is currently holding elected office. It is most well known as part of American politics. In the United States' dominant two-party system, the switches generally occur between the Republican Party and the Democratic Party, although there have also been a number of notable switches to and from third parties, and even between third parties. Use of the term party switch often connotes a transfer of held power from one party to another. Politics is the process and method of decision-making for groups of human beings. ... A political party is a political organization that subscribes to a certain ideology and seeks to attain political power within a government. ... An election is a process in which a vote is held to elect candidates to an office. ... A two-party system is a type of party system where only two political parties have a realistic chance of winning an election. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... In a two-party system a third party is a party other than the two dominant ones. ...


The majority of party switchers in the modern era have switched from the Democratic Party to the Republican Party. This behavior has been most widespread in the South. The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ...

Contents

Motivations

There are a number of reasons why an elected official, or someone seeking office, might choose to switch parties. One reason is ethical obligation--the person feels their views are no longer aligned with those of their current party.


A second reason is to gain power and influence. The incumbent may be a member of the minority party in a legislature and would like to gain the advantages of being in the majority party, such as the potential to chair a committee. The incumbent, in politics, is the current holder of a political office. ... In sociology and in voting theory, a minority is a sub-group that is outnumbered by persons who do not belong to it. ... Chamber of the Estates-General, the Dutch legislature. ... A simple majority is the most common requirement in voting for a measure to pass, especially in deliberative bodies and small organizations. ... A chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... A Congressional committee in the parlance of the United States Congress and politics of the United States is a legislative sub-organization that handles a specific duty (rather than the general duties of Congress, i. ...


Another reason is simply "to get elected." This may be the primary reason when the opposing party's base in a constituency is reaching a size that threatens the safe reelection of the incumbent. In politics, the term base refers to a group of voters who will almost always support a single partys candidates for United States, this is typically because high-level candidates must hold the same stances on key issues as a partys base in order to gain the party... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ... A safe seat is a seat in a legislature which is regarded as fully secured by a certain political party with very little chance of an election upset. ...


History

The nineteenth century

The shifting of allegiance between political parties was much more common during the nineteenth century than it is today. It took several years for political parties as we know them today to coalesce after the founding of the United States, and many parties formed and fell apart rapidly.


A massive party switch occurred in the 1800s and 1810s when many members of the United States Federalist Party joined the United States Democratic-Republican Party. When this party fell apart in the 1820s, its members all switched to various political parties, including the United States Whig Party, as well as the Democratic, National Republican, Anti-Jackson and Anti-Mason Parties. The Republican Party was also formed by a massive party switch in 1854 when northern members of the Whig, American and Free Soil parties, along with a few northern Democrats, formed the Republican Party, and many Southern Whigs became Democrats. Following the United States Civil War the Republican Party faced several massive party switches. As Reconstruction ended, many Southern Republicans became Democrats. In 1872 Republicans dissatisfied with President Ulysses S. Grant formed the Liberal Republican Party and had a joint presidential campaign with the Democrats. Most Liberal Republicans soon returned to the main Republican Party, however. A similar situation occurred in 1884 when the mugwumps left the Republican Party and supported the Democratic presidential candidate, later rejoining the Republican party. By the late 19th century, as the Democratic and Republican parties became more established, however, party switching became less frequent. Events and Trends Beginning of the Napoleonic Wars (1803 - 1815). ... Events and Trends End of the Napoleonic Wars in Europe (1803 - 1815). ... The label Federalist refers to two major groups in the history of the United States of America: (1. ... The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... Events and Trends Nationalistic independence movements helped reshape the world during this decade: Greece declares independence from the Ottoman Empire (1821). ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States organized in 1848 that petered out by about 1852. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the northern states, popularly referred to as the U.S., the Union, the North, or the Yankees; and the seceding southern states, commonly referred to as the Confederate States of America, the CSA, the Confederacy... In the history of the United States, Reconstruction was the period after the American Civil War when the southern states of the defeated Confederacy, which had seceded from the United States, were reintegrated into the Union. ... 1872 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Ulysses Simpson Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American Civil War general and the 18th (1869–1877) president of the United States. ... The United States Liberal Republican Party was a political party formed in 1872 to oppose the administration of the then-current President, Ulysses S. Grant. ... 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ... Mugwumps were Republicans who supported Democratic candidate Grover Cleveland in the 1884 United States presidential election. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The twentieth century

The shifts in American voter demographics beginning in the second half of the twentieth century - the southern states from Democratic to Republican, and New England, the Great Lakes states, and the coastal states from Republican to Democratic - have prompted several incumbent federal legislators and many state legislators to switch parties. For the Finno-Ugric people, see Votes. ... Demographics comprises selected characteristics of a population (age and income distribution and trends, mobility, educational attainment, home ownership and employment status, for instance) for purposes of social studies. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s The 20th century lasted from 1901 to 2000 in the Gregorian calendar (often from (1900 to 1999 in common usage). ... The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... Modern New England, the six northeastern-most states of the United States, indicated by red The New England region of the United States is located in the northeastern corner of the country. ... Categories: US geography stubs | Regions of the United States ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... State legislatures are the lawmaking bodies of the 50 states in the United States of America. ...


Notable party switchers

Notable party switchers of the modern era include:


Democrat to Republican

Though he never formally changed his affiliation, former U.S. Senator Zell B. Miller (D-Georgia), caucused with the Senate Republicans and spoke at the 2004 Republican National Convention. Former Democratic New York City mayor Ed Koch also announced his support for Bush. Floyd Davidson Spence (April 9, 1928-August 16, 2001) was a Republican politician from South Carolina. ... State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population (2000)  - Population 4,012,012 (26th)  - Density 51. ... Strom Thurmond James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902–June 26, 2003), known as Strom Thurmond, was the oldest and longest serving United States Senator, who represented South Carolina from 1954 to April 1956 and November 1956 to 1964 as a Democrat and from 1964 to 2003 as a Republican. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population (2000)  - Population 4,012,012 (26th)  - Density 51. ... Albert William Watson (August 30, 1922 _ September 25, 1994) was a South Carolina politician. ... State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population (2000)  - Population 4,012,012 (26th)  - Density 51. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9. ... Mills Edwin Godwin, Jr. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... Bob Stump (April 4, 1927 - June 20, 2003) was a U.S. Congressman Stump was born in Phoenix, Arizona and was a U.S. Navy World War II combat veteran, where he served on the USS Tulagi from 1943-1946. ... State nickname: The Grand Canyon State, The Copper State Other U.S. States Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Governor Janet Napolitano Official languages English Only State Area 295,254 km² (6th)  - Land 294,312 km²  - Water 942 km² (0. ... Eugene Vincent Atkinson (born April 5, 1927) was a member of the House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... William Philip Phil Gramm (born July 8, 1942 in Fort Benning, Georgia) served as a Democratic Congressman (1978-1983), a Republican Congressman (1983-1984), and a Republican Senator from Texas (1985-2002). ... State nickname: Lone Star State Other U.S. States Capital Austin Largest city Houston Governor Rick Perry Official languages None. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... State nickname: Everglade State, Sunshine State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush Official languages English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,486 km² (17. ... State nickname: Everglade State, Sunshine State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush Official languages English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,486 km² (17. ... Tommy Franklin Robinson (born March 7, 1942) is a politician from the state of Arkansas. ... State nickname: The Natural State Other U.S. States Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Governor Mike Huckabee Official languages English Area 137,732 km² (29th)  - Land 134,856 km²  - Water 2,876 km² (2. ... Charles Buddy Elson Roemer, III (born October 4, 1943) was Governor of Louisiana from 1988 to 1992. ... State nickname: Pelican State Other U.S. States Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans Governor Kathleen Blanco Official languages None; English and French de facto Area 134,382 km² (31st)  - Land 112,927 km²  - Water 21,455 km² (16%) Population (2000)  - Population 4,468,976 (22nd)  - Density 39. ... Dick Shelby Richard Craig Dick Shelby (born May 6, 1934) is an American politician. ... Alabama is a state located in the southern United States; the population of Alabama is 4,447,100 as of 2000. ... James Allison Jimmy Hayes (b. ... State nickname: Pelican State Other U.S. States Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans Governor Kathleen Blanco Official languages None; English and French de facto Area 134,382 km² (31st)  - Land 112,927 km²  - Water 21,455 km² (16%) Population (2000)  - Population 4,468,976 (22nd)  - Density 39. ... Gregory H. Laughlin (b. ... State nickname: Lone Star State Other U.S. States Capital Austin Largest city Houston Governor Rick Perry Official languages None. ... Ben Nighthorse Campbell (born April 13, 1933) is an American politician. ... There are also three Colorado Rivers: two in the United States and one in Argentina. ... Wilbert Joseph Tauzin (born June 14, American politician of Cajun descent, was a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1980-2004, representing the 3rd District of Louisiana. ... State nickname: Pelican State Other U.S. States Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans Governor Kathleen Blanco Official languages None; English and French de facto Area 134,382 km² (31st)  - Land 112,927 km²  - Water 21,455 km² (16%) Population (2000)  - Population 4,468,976 (22nd)  - Density 39. ... John Nathan Deal (born August 25, 1942), American politician, has been a member of the United States House of Representatives since 1993, representing the 10th District of Georgia (the 9th District from 1993-2003). ... Michael Parker (b. ... State nickname: Magnolia State Other U.S. States Capital Jackson Largest city Jackson Governor Haley Barbour Official languages English Area 125,546 km² (32nd)  - Land 121,606 km²  - Water 3,940 km² (3%) Population (2000)  - Population 2,697,243 (31st)  - Density 23. ... Wesley Wade Watkins (b. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... State nickname: Sooner State Other U.S. States Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Governor Brad Henry Official languages None Area 181,196 km² (20th)  - Land 178,023 km²  - Water 3,173 km² (1. ... Norm Coleman Norman Bertram Norm Coleman (born August 17, 1949) is an American politician and Republican U.S. Senator from Minnesota since 2003. ... A mayor (from the Latin maīor, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... State capitol building in Saint Paul Saint Paul is the capital and second-largest city of the state of Minnesota in the United States of America. ... Matthew Gilbert Martinez (b. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... Michael Bloomberg Michael Rubens Mike Bloomberg (born February 14, 1942) is a businessman and mayor of New York City. ... A mayor (from the Latin maīor, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Amy Tuck is currently the Lieutenant Governor of Mississippi, a Republican. ... State nickname: Magnolia State Other U.S. States Capital Jackson Largest city Jackson Governor Haley Barbour Official languages English Area 125,546 km² (32nd)  - Land 121,606 km²  - Water 3,940 km² (3%) Population (2000)  - Population 2,697,243 (31st)  - Density 23. ... Ralph Hall (born May 3, 1923) is a United States Representative from the Fourth Congressional District in Texas. ... State nickname: Lone Star State Other U.S. States Capital Austin Largest city Houston Governor Rick Perry Official languages None. ... Rodney Alexander (born December 5, 1946), American politician, has been a member of the United States House of Representatives since 2003, representing the 5th District of Louisiana. ... State nickname: Pelican State Other U.S. States Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans Governor Kathleen Blanco Official languages None; English and French de facto Area 134,382 km² (31st)  - Land 112,927 km²  - Water 21,455 km² (16%) Population (2000)  - Population 4,468,976 (22nd)  - Density 39. ... Zell Miller Zell Bryan Miller (born February 24, 1932) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... 2004 Republican National Convention Logo President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney accepted their partys nomination to run for second terms. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... A mayor (from the Latin maīor, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... Ed Koch, a Democrat, speaks at the 2004 Republican National Convention in support of the re-election of President George W. Bush. ...


Democrat to third party/independent

Harry Flood Byrd, Jr. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... Virgil Hamlin Goode Jr. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... Categories: Stub | 1965 births | Green politicians ... In American politics, the Green Party is a third party which has been active in some areas since the 1980s, but first gained widespread public attention for Ralph Naders presidential runs in 1996 and 2000. ... This article is about the city in California. ... In American politics, the Green Party is a third party which has been active in some areas since the 1980s, but first gained widespread public attention for Ralph Naders presidential runs in 1996 and 2000. ... State nickname: The Garden State Other U.S. States Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Governor Richard Codey (acting) Official languages None defined Area 22,608 km² (47th)  - Land 19,231 km²  - Water 3,378 km² (14. ...

Republican to Democrat

  • 1901 - Fred Dubois, while U.S. Senator from Idaho
  • 1960's - Hillary Clinton, while in college
  • 1971 - John Lindsay, while mayor of New York City
  • 1971 - Leon Panetta, switched parties while not in or running for public office. He later became a U.S. representative from California (1976) and White House Chief of Staff (1994).
  • 1972 - Ogden R. Reid, while U.S. representative from New York
  • 1973 - Don Riegle, while U.S. representative from Michigan
  • 1977 - Peter Peyser, after three terms in the House as a New York Republican, vacated his seat to run for nomination for the Senate in 1976. After his unsuccessful attempt, he switched to the Democratic party and regained his House seat in 1978.
  • 1999 - Michael Forbes, while U.S. representative from New York
  • 2003 - Barbara Hafer, while State Treasurer of Pennsylvania
  • 2004 - Larry Drown, Vermont politician, ran unsuccessfully as a Republican for the statewide positions of secretary of state and attorney general in previous elections, switched to the Democratic party after hearing John Edwards speak in New Hampshire. Drown then ran for Congress, but received only 7% of the vote, coming in third place.

State nickname: Gem State Other U.S. States Capital Boise Largest city Boise Governor Dirk Kempthorne Official languages none Area 216,632 km² (14th)  - Land 214,499 km²  - Water 2,133 km² (0. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... John Vliet Lindsay (November 24, 1921–December 19, 2000) was an American politician who served as a Congressman (1959-1966) and mayor of New York City (1966-1973). ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Leon Edward Panetta (born June 28, 1938) is a former White House Chief of Staff to Bill Clinton, a former member of the United States House of Representatives, and the founder and director of the Panetta Institute. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... The White House Chief of Staff is the highest-ranking member of the Executive Office of the President of the United States. ... Ogden Rogers Reid (born June 24, 1925) was a member of the House of Representatives. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Donald Wayne Riegle Jr. ... State nickname: Wolverine State or Great Lakes State Other U.S. States Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Governor Jennifer Granholm Official languages English Area 250,941 km² (11th)  - Land 147,255 km²  - Water 103,687 km² (41. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... Michael Patrick Forbes (b. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... State nickname: The Green Mountain State Other U.S. States Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Governor Jim Douglas Official languages None Area 24,923 km² (45th)  - Land 23,974 km²  - Water 949 km² (3. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards (born June 10, 1953) is a former United States Senator from North Carolina. ... State nickname: The Granite State Other U.S. States Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Governor John Lynch Official languages English Area 24,239 km² (46th)  - Land 23,249 km²  - Water 814 km² (3. ...

Republican to third party/independent

  • 1912 - Theodore Roosevelt, former President of the United States, left the Republican Party after a failed attempt to be nominated for President again. He ran as the candidate of the newly formed Progressive Party, better known as the Bull Moose Party, and received second place, doing better than the Republican candidate but being defeated by the Democratic candidate.
  • 1936 George William Norris progressive Republican United States Senator from Nebraska left the Republican Party to become an independent and was reelected to the Senate once more, but was defeated in 1942 by a Republican in a race which also involved a Democrat.
  • 1937 or 1938 - Vito Marcantonio, a liberal Republican congressman from New York left the party after being defeated for reelection, and joined the American Labor Party. He was then reelected to Congress.
  • 1952 - Wayne Morse, while U.S. senator from Oregon. He then switched from independent to Democrat in 1956.
  • 1972 - Roger MacBride, went from Republican to Libertarian and back to Republican
  • 1988 - Ron Paul, a former Republican congressman, ran for President as a Libertarian. He later returned to Congress as a Republican.
  • 1990 - Walter Hickel, before his successful bid for Governor of Alaska, switched to the Alaskan Independence Party. He rejoined the Republican party in 1994.
  • 1990 - Lowell P. Weicker, before running for governor of Connecticut
  • 1999 Pat Buchanan right-wing commentator who attempted to secure the 1996 Republican presidential nomination, left the Republican Party and gathered his supporters to take over the Reform Party, for which he ran unsuccessfully for president in 2000.
  • 1999 Robert C. Smith United States Senator from New Hampshire known as the most conservative person in the Senate, left the Republican Party to become an independent but rejoined the Republican Party a few months later.
  • 2001 - James M. Jeffords, while U.S. senator from Vermont. This move changed the balance of power in the Senate from 50-50, with Republican Vice President Richard B. Cheney casting the tie-breaking vote and thus providing a "51" majority, to 50-49-1, giving the Democrats majority control of the Senate until it was lost after the 2002 midterm elections.

Order: 26th President Vice President: Charles Warren Fairbanks Term of office: September 14, 1901 – March 3, 1909 Preceded by: William McKinley Succeeded by: William Howard Taft Date of birth: October 27, 1858 Place of birth: New York City Date of death: January 6, 1919 Place of death: Oyster Bay, New... George William Norris (July 11, 1861 - September 2, 1944) was a U.S. political figure. ... State nickname: Cornhusker State Other U.S. States Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Governor Dave Heineman Official languages English Area 200,520 km² (16th)  - Land 199,099 km²  - Water 1,247 km² (0. ... Vito Anthony Marcantonio (December 10, 1902 August 9, 1954) was an American lawyer and politician. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... The American Labor Party was a socialist political party in the United States active almost exclusively in the state of New York. ... Wayne Morse (October 20, 1900 - July 22, 1974) was a United States Senator from Oregon from 1945 to 1969. ... State nickname: Beaver State Other U.S. States Capital Salem Largest city Portland Governor Ted Kulongoski Official languages None Area 255,026 km² (9th)  - Land 248,849 km²  - Water 6,177 km² (2. ... Roger MacBride (6 August 1927 - 5 March 1995) was a U.S. lawyer, political figure, and television producer. ... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party created in 1971. ... Representative Ron Paul Ronald Ernest Paul, MD (born August 20, 1935) is a member of the United States House of Representatives from Texass 14th congressional district ( map). ... Categories: People stubs | 1919 births | Governors of Alaska | U.S. Secretaries of the Interior ... A governor is also a device that regulates the speed of a machine. ... State nickname: The Last Frontier, The Land of the Midnight Sun Other U.S. States Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Governor Frank Murkowski Official languages English Area 1,717,854 km² (1st)  - Land 1,481,347 km²  - Water 236,507 km² (13. ... Categories: Organization stubs | United States regional and state political parties | Secessionist organizations ... Lowell Palmer Weicker, Jr. ... State nickname: The Constitution State Other U.S. States Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Governor M. Jodi Rell Official languages English Area 14,371 km² (48th)  - Land 12,559 km²  - Water 1,809 km² (12. ... Patrick Buchanan Patrick Joseph Buchanan (born November 2, 1938), usually known as Pat Buchanan, is an American conservative journalist and a well known television political commentator. ... Robert C. Bob Smith (born March 30, 1941) is an American politician that has served in both the United States House of Representatives and the Senate. ... State nickname: The Granite State Other U.S. States Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Governor John Lynch Official languages English Area 24,239 km² (46th)  - Land 23,249 km²  - Water 814 km² (3. ... James Merrill Jim Jeffords (born May 11, 1934) is currently the junior U.S. Senator from Vermont and the only Independent in the United States Senate. ... State nickname: The Green Mountain State Other U.S. States Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Governor Jim Douglas Official languages None Area 24,923 km² (45th)  - Land 23,974 km²  - Water 949 km² (3. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is a heartbeat from the presidency. As first in the presidential line of succession, the Vice President becomes the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation... Richard Bruce Cheney (born January 30, 1941), widely known as Dick Cheney, is an American politician and businessman affiliated with the U.S. Republican Party. ... Republican hold in light red, Republican pickup in dark red, Democratic hold in light blue, Democratic pickup in dark blue. ...

Other

  • 1935 - Robert LaFollette Jr., while U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, switched from the Republican Party to the Progressive Party.
  • 1941 - Henrik Shipstead, while U.S. Senator from Minnesota, switched from the Farmer-Labor Party to the Republican Party.
  • 1980 - Thomas Foglietta, while running for U.S. representative from Pennsylvania as an independent, having previously been a Republican councilman and mayoral candidate, switched to the Democratic party.
  • 2000 - Jesse Ventura, while governor of Minnesota, left the Reform Party, along with most of his supporters, to create the separate Independence Party of Minnesota

There have been several instances of politicians continuing to be a member of a political party while running other campaigns as an independent. The most prominent examples include southern Democratic segregationists Strom Thurmond in 1948 and George Wallace in 1968, who remained in the Democratic Party for statewide campaigns but mounted national presidential campaigns as independents. Wallace later ran in the 1972 Democratic primaries. Earlier, liberal Republican Robert La Follette, Sr. ran for President as the candidate of the Progressive Party in 1924, while still remaining a Republican in the Senate. One of the periods of glaciation was also termed the Wisconsin glaciation. ... Henrik Shipstead (January 8, 1881 – June 26, 1960) was an American politician. ... State nickname: North Star State Other U.S. States Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Governor Tim Pawlenty Official languages None Area 225,365 km² (12th)  - Land 206,375 km²  - Water 18,990 km² (8. ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... Jesse Ventura Jesse Ventura (born July 15, 1951, as James George Janos, which is still his legal name) was elected the 38th Governor of Minnesota on November 3, 1998, after a career as Navy SEAL, professional wrestler, actor, mayor, and radio talk show host. ... The Governor of Minnesota is the chief executive of the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 under the belief that Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics--as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital... The Independence Party of Minnesota (often abbreviated IP or IPM), formerly the Reform Party of Minnesota, is the third largest political party in Minnesota, behind the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) (affiliated with the national Democratic Party) and Republican Party of Minnesota. ... Strom Thurmond James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902–June 26, 2003), known as Strom Thurmond, was the oldest and longest serving United States Senator, who represented South Carolina from 1954 to April 1956 and November 1956 to 1964 as a Democrat and from 1964 to 2003 as a Republican. ... George Corley Wallace (August 25, 1919, Clio, Alabama, USA – September 13, 1998, Montgomery, Alabama, USA) was an American politician who was elected Governor of Alabama (as a Democrat) four times (1962, 1970, 1974 and 1982) and ran for U.S. President (in 1964, 1968, 1972 and 1976). ... Robert Marion La Follette, Sr. ...


Other political figures, such as Miller and Koch in the previous section, do not formally leave their parties, but support a candidate from another party. This received much media attention in 2004, when Democrats for Bush and Republicans for Kerry groups were formed. Republicans for Kerry was a non-profit, volunteer-run group of registered Republicans and independent voters. ...


Party switching in other countries

Party switching is also quite common in countries other than the United States. In many countries, it takes the form of politicians refusing to support their political parties in coalition governments. This is particularly common in countries with less established political parties, such as Vanuatu and French Polynesia where in 2004, a few members of various parties left the coalition, forcing it to collapse. As in the United States, new parties are often formed by party switches, such as in the United Kingdom, where some liberals moved to the Labour Party in the early twentieth century. In formerly communist countries in Europe, many communists switch to other parties ranging on the political spectrum from socialist to conservative. In Australia there have been high profile defections in recent history, including the move by Cheryl Kernot then leader of the Australian Democrats to the ALP, the declared independence of former ALP senator Mal Colston and the disintegration of the Democrats. A coalition government, or coalition cabinet, is a cabinet in parliamentary government in which several parties cooperate. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... Communism - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Cheryl Kernot was the fifth leader of the Australian Democrats (April 23, 1993 to October 15, 1997) before controversially changing to become a member of the Australian Labor Party (ALP). ... The Australian Democrats (in regular parlance, just the Democrats), is an Australian social liberal party formed in 1977 from the earlier Australia Party by Don Chipp, who left the Liberal Party of Australia to do so. ... The Australian Labor Party or ALP is Australias oldest political party. ...


Notable switches in Canada

Lucien Bouchard official Quebec government picture. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The Bloc Qu cois is a federal political party in Canada that is primarily devoted to promoting sovereignty for the province of Quebec. ... The Honourable Scott A. Brison (b. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas largest political party. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada) is a right wing political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... John Bryden (born July 15, 1943, Dundas, Ontario) is a Canadian politician, journalist, and author of books on Canadas involvement in World War II. Contents // Categories: Canadian people stubs | 1943 births | Canadian journalists | Canadian writers | Members of the Canadian House of Commons ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas largest political party. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada) is a right wing political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... Dr. Keith Martin (born 1960) is a Canadian physician and politician. ... The Canadian Alliance (in full, the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance) was a Canadian right_of_centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas largest political party. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada) is a right wing political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ...

See also

RINO stands for Republican In Name Only, a disparaging term for a member of the United States Republican Party whose words and actions are thought to be too fiscally or socially liberal. ... Red states and blue states are those U.S. states having residents who predominantly vote for the Republican Party or Democratic Party, respectively, in elections in the United States. ... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states which have membership of the federation known as the United States of America (USA or U.S.). The separate state governments and the U.S. federal government share sovereignty. ... In politics, crossing the floor is to vote against party lines. ... The Westminster System is a democratic system of government modelled after that of the United Kingdom system of government and used in Westminster, the seat of government, hence its name. ...

External links

  • http://edition.cnn.com/2001/ALLPOLITICS/05/23/switchers.list - A list of party switchers (compiled in 2001)
  • http://www.cookpolitical.com/column/1999/072099.php - An overview of party switching in recent years.
  • http://archives.cnn.com/2001/ALLPOLITICS/05/23/party.switchers/ - "Party switching comes with political risks"

  Results from FactBites:
 
Party switching in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2769 words)
In United States politics, party switching is any change in party affiliation of a partisan public figure, usually one who is currently holding elected office.
The incumbent may be a member of the minority party in a legislature and would like to gain the advantages of being in the majority party, such as the potential to chair a committee.
The Republican Party was also formed by a massive party switch in 1854 when northern members of the Whig, American and Free Soil parties, along with a few northern Democrats, formed the Republican Party, and many Southern Whigs became Democrats.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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