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Encyclopedia > Partition of Babylon

The Partition of Babylon designates the attribution of the territories by Alexander the Great between his generals, soon after his death in 323 BCE. The partition was a result of a compromise, essentially brokered by Eumenes, following a conflict of opinion between the party of Meleager, who wished to give full power to Philip III of Macedon, and the party of Perdiccas, who wished to wait for the birth of the heir of Alexander (the future Alexander IV of Macedon) to give him the throne under the control of a regent. Under the agreement, Philip III became king, but Perdiccas, as a regent, ruled. Perdiccas, as regent, managed the repartition of the territories between the former generals and satraps of Alexander. Meleager and about 300 of his partisans were eliminated by Perdiccas soon after. Alexander the Great (Greek: Μέγας Αλέξανδρος[1] Megas Alexandros; July 356 BC — June 11, 323 BC), also known as Alexander III, king of Macedon (336–323 BC), is considered one of the most successful military commanders in history, conquering most of his known world before his death. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC - 320s BC - 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 328 BC 327 BC 326 BC 325 BC 324 BC - 323 BC - 322 BC 321 BC 320... Eumenes of Cardia (c. ... Meleager (d. ... Philip III (Arrhidaeus) (c. ... Perdiccas (d. ... Alexander IV Aegus (in Greek Aλεξανδρος Aιγος; 323–309 BC was the posthumous son of Alexander the Great by his wife Roxana, a princess of Bactria. ... Perdiccas (d. ...

Partition of Babylon
King Philip III of Macedon
Regent Perdiccas
Commander in Chief Seleucus
Chief of the guards Cassander
Egypt Ptolemy
Syria Laomedon of Mytilene
Cilicia Philotas
Illyria Philo
Greater Media Atropates
Less Father-in-law of Perdiccas
Susiana Antigenes
Greater Phrygia Antigonus
Lycia
Pamphylia
Nearchus
Caria Cassander
Lydia Menander
Lesser Phrygia Leonnatus
Thrace Lysimachus
Cappadocia
Paphlagonia
Eumenes
Punjab Taxiles
Indian colonies Python
Paropamisia Extarches
Arachosia
Gedrosia
Sibyrtius
Drancae
Arci
Stasanor
Bactria Amyntas
Sogdia Scythaeus
Parthia Nicanor
Hyrcania Philip
Armenia Phrataphernes
Persia Tlepolemus
Babylonia Peucestas
Pelasgia Archon
Mesopotamia Arcesilaus

Justin describes in details how the various territories were attributed: Look up monarch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Philip III (Arrhidaeus) (c. ... // High public office A regent, from the Latin regens who reigns is anyone who acts as head of state, especially if not the monarch (who has higher titles). ... Perdiccas (d. ... Silver coin of Seleucus. ... Cassander (c. ... Ptolemy I Soter (367 BC–283 BC) was a Macedonian Greek who became the ruler of Egypt (323 BC - 283 BC) and founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty. ... Laomedon (in Greek Λαoμέδων; lived 4th century BC), native of Mytilene and son of Larichus, was one of Alexander the Greats generals, and appears to have enjoyed a high place in his confidence even before the death of Philip II, as he was one of those banished by that... Cilicia as Roman province, 120 AD In Antiquity, Cilicia (Κιλικία) was the name of a region, now known as Çukurova, and often a political unit, on the southeastern coast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey), north of Cyprus. ... Philotas (in Greek Φιλωτας; lived 4th century BC) was a Macedonian officer in the service of Alexander the Great, who commanded one taxis or division of the phalanx during the advance into Sogdiana and India. ... Illyria Illyria (Anc. ... Greater Media, Inc. ... Atropates (in Greek Aτρoπατης; in Old Persian Atarepata), called Atrapes by Diodorus1, a Persian satrap, apparently of Media, had the command of the Medes, together with the Cadusii, Albani, and Sacesinae, at the battle of Gaugamela, 331 BC. After the death of king Darius III Codomannus (330 BC), he... Less is a grammatical particle in the English language, functioning as an adverb that modifies comparatives. ... Perdiccas (d. ... The ancient Elamite Empire, تمدن عیلام in Farsi, lay to the east of Sumer and Akkad, in what is now southwestern Iran. ... Location of Phrygia - traditional region (yellow) - expanded kingdom (orange line) In antiquity, Phrygia was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolian Highland, part of modern Turkey. ... Antigonus I Cyclops or Monophthalmos (the One-eyed, so called from his having lost an eye) (382 BC - 301 BC) was a Macedonian nobleman, general, and satrap under Alexander the Great. ... Lycia (Lycian: Trm̃misa) is a region in the modern day Antalya Province on the southern coast of Turkey. ... Pamphylia, in ancient geography, was the region in the south of Asia Minor, between Lycia and Cilicia, extending from the Mediterranean to Mount Taurus. ... Nearchus (or Nearchos) was one of the officers in the army of Alexander the Great. ... Location of Caria Caria (Greek Καρία; see also List of traditional Greek place names) was a region of Asia Minor, situated south of Ionia, and west of Phrygia and Lycia. ... Cassander (c. ... Lydia is a historic region of western Anatolia, congruent with Turkeys modern provinces of Ä°zmir and Manisa. ... Menander (in Greek MενανδρoÏ‚; lived 4th century BC) was an officer in the service of Alexander the Great. ... Location of Phrygia - traditional region (yellow) - expanded kingdom (orange line) In antiquity, Phrygia was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolian Highland, part of modern Turkey. ... Leonnatus (356 BC - 322 BC), Macedonian officer of Alexander the Great and one of the diadochi. ... Thrace (Greek Θράκη, ThrákÄ“, Latin: Thracia or Threcia, Turkish Trakya, Bulgarian Тракия, Trakiya) is a historical and geographic area in southeast Europe. ... Lysimachus (c. ... Cappadocia in 188 BC In ancient geography, Cappadocia (Greek: Καππαδοκία; see also List of traditional Greek place names; Turkish Kapadokya) was an extensive inland district of Asia Minor (modern Turkey). ... Paphlagonia was an ancient area on the Black Sea coast of north central Anatolia, situated between Bithynia and Pontus, and separated from Phrygia (later, Galatia) by a prolongation to the east of the Bithynian Olympus. ... Eumenes of Cardia (c. ... Punjab (or Panjab) may refer to: Punjab region, an area of South Asia shared by India and Pakistan Punjab (India), a state in India Punjab (Pakistan), the most populated province in Pakistan Haryana, a former part of Punjab Himachal Pradesh, a former part of Punjab A number of former states... Taxiles (in Greek Tαξιλης; lived 4th century BC) was a prince or king, who reigned over the tract between the Indus and the Hydaspes rivers, in the Punjab at the period of the expedition of Alexander the Great, 327 BC. His real name was Ambhi, and the Greeks appear to... Peithon, son of Agenor (?-312 BCE) was an officer in the expedition of Alexander the Great to India, who became satrap of the Indus from 325 to 316 BCE, and then satrap of Babylon, from 316 to 312 BCE, until he died at the Battle of Gaza in 312 BCE... The Paropamisadae is an ancient area of the Hindu-Kush, in the Eastern part of Afghanistan. ... Arachosia is the ancient name of an area that corresponds to the southern part of today s Afghanistan, around the city of Kandahar. ... Gedrosia is the ancient name of an area that corresponds to the southernwestern part of today s Pakistan, from the Indus River to the areas of Baluchistan and Makran. ... Sibyrtius (in Greek ΣιβυρτιoÏ‚; lived 4th century BC) was a Macedonian officer in the service of Alexander the Great, who was appointed by him, on his return from India (326 BC), governor of the province of Carmania. ... Stasanor (in Greek Στασανωρ; lived 4th century BC) was a native of Soli in Cyprus who held a distinguished position among the officers of Alexander the Great. ... It has been suggested that Ta-Hsia be merged into this article or section. ... Sogdiana (Sug`ud,Sug`diyona - Uzbek, Sughd - Tajik, Sugdiane, Old Persian Sughuda, Persian:سغد, Chinese: Sute 粟特) was an ancient civilization of Iranian peoples, then was a province of the Achaemenian Empire, the eighteenth in the list in the Behistun Inscription of Darius the Great (i. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Gorgan (گرگان); Hyrcania ; Hyrcana (Old Persian Varkâna, land of wolves; modern Persian Gorgan): part of the ancient Persian empire, on the southern shores of the Caspian Sea (present day Golestan, Mazandaran, Gilan and parts of Turkmenistan). ... Philip (in Greek ΦιλιππoÏ‚; died 318 BC) was satrap of Sogdiana, to which government he was first appointed by Alexander the Great himself in 327 BC. He retained his post, as did most of the satraps of the more remote provinces, in the arrangements which followed the death of the... Phrataphernes (in Greek Φραταφερνης; lived 4th century BC) was a Persian who held the government of Parthia and Hyrcania, under the king Darius III Codomannus, and joined that monarch with the contingents from the provinces subject to his rule, shortly before the battle of Gaugamela, 331 BC. He afterwards accompanied the... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Tlepolemus (in Greek TληπoλεμoÏ‚; lived 4th century BC) was the son of Pythophanes and one of the etairoi, or body-guard of Alexander the Great, who was joined in the government of the Parthians and Hyrcanii with Amminapes, a Parthian, whom Alexander had appointed satrap of those provinces. ... Babylonia, named for its capital city, Babylon, was an ancient state in the south part of Mesopotamia (in modern Iraq), combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... Peucestas (in Greek Πευκεστας;lived 4th century BC) was son of Alexander, a native of the town of Mieza, in Macedonia, and a distinguished officer in the service of Alexander the Great. ... Archon (ib Greek Aρχων; lived 4th century BC) was a Pellaean appointed satrap of Babylonia after the death of Alexander the Great, 323 BC.1, is probably the same as the son of Cleinias mentioned in the Indian expedition of Alexander. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Justin may refer to: Justin (name), a common given name Junianus Justinus, a 3rd century Roman historian Justin I (c. ...

-"In the first place Egypt, with part of Africa and Arabia, fell by lot to Ptolemy, whom Alexander, for his merit, had raised from the condition of a common soldier;
- and Cleomenes, who had built Alexandria, was directed to put the province into his hands.
- Laomedon of Mytilene was allotted Syria, which bordered on Ptolemy's province;
- Philotas, Cilicia;
- and Philo, Illyria.
- Atropates was set over the Greater Media;
- the father-in-law of Perdiccas over the Less.
- Susiana was assigned to Scynus [this is thought to be an error as Arrian says Susiana went to Antigenes]
- and the Greater Phrygia to Antigonus, the son of Philip.
- Nearchus received Lycia and Pamphylia;
- Cassander, Caria;
- and Menander, Lydia.
- The Lesser Phrygia fell to Leonnatus;
- Thrace, and the coasts of the Pontic sea, to Lysimachus;
- Cappadocia and Paphlagonia were given to Eumenes.
The chief command of the camp fell to Seleucus the son of Antiochus. Cassander, the son of Antipater, was made commander of the king's guards and attendants.
In Ulterior Bactriana, and the countries of India, the present governors were allowed to retain their office.
- The region between the rivers Hydaspes and Indus, Taxiles received.
- To the colonies settled in India, Python, the son of Agenor, was sent.
- Of Paropamisia, and the borders of mount Caucasus, Extarches had the command.
- The Arachosians and Gedrosians were assigned to Sibyrtius;
- the Drancae and Arci to Stasanor.
- Amyntas was allotted the Bactrians,
- Scythaeus, the Sogdians,
- Nicanor, the Parthians,
- Philip, the Hyrcanians,
- Phrataphernes, the Armenians,
- Tlepolemus, the Persians,
- Peucestas, the Babylonians,
- Archon, the Pelasgians,
- Arcesilaus, Mesopotamia."
Justin, Epitome of the Philippic History of Pompeius Trogus XIII-4

This partition was followed by a second one, the Partition of Triparadisus, in 320 BCE. Ptolemy I Soter (367 BC–283 BC) was a Macedonian Greek who became the ruler of Egypt (323 BC - 283 BC) and founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty. ... Cleomenes (in Greek Kλεoμενης; died 322 BC), a Greek of Naucratis in Egypt, was appointed by Alexander the Great as nomarch of the Arabian district (νoμoÏ‚) of Egypt and receiver of the tributes from all the districts of Egypt and the neighbouring part of Africa (331 BC). ... Laomedon (in Greek Λαoμέδων; lived 4th century BC), native of Mytilene and son of Larichus, was one of Alexander the Greats generals, and appears to have enjoyed a high place in his confidence even before the death of Philip II, as he was one of those banished by that... Philotas (in Greek Φιλωτας; lived 4th century BC) was a Macedonian officer in the service of Alexander the Great, who commanded one taxis or division of the phalanx during the advance into Sogdiana and India. ... Cilicia as Roman province, 120 AD In Antiquity, Cilicia (Κιλικία) was the name of a region, now known as Çukurova, and often a political unit, on the southeastern coast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey), north of Cyprus. ... Illyria Illyria (Anc. ... Atropates (in Greek Aτρoπατης; in Old Persian Atarepata), called Atrapes by Diodorus1, a Persian satrap, apparently of Media, had the command of the Medes, together with the Cadusii, Albani, and Sacesinae, at the battle of Gaugamela, 331 BC. After the death of king Darius III Codomannus (330 BC), he... Greater Media, Inc. ... Less is a grammatical particle in the English language, functioning as an adverb that modifies comparatives. ... The ancient Elamite Empire, تمدن عیلام in Farsi, lay to the east of Sumer and Akkad, in what is now southwestern Iran. ... Alexander the Great Lucius Flavius Arrianus Xenophon (c. ... Location of Phrygia - traditional region (yellow) - expanded kingdom (orange line) In antiquity, Phrygia was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolian Highland, part of modern Turkey. ... Antigonus I Cyclops or Monophthalmos (the One-eyed, so called from his having lost an eye) (382 BC - 301 BC) was a Macedonian nobleman, general, and satrap under Alexander the Great. ... Nearchus (or Nearchos) was one of the officers in the army of Alexander the Great. ... Lycia (Lycian: Trm̃misa) is a region in the modern day Antalya Province on the southern coast of Turkey. ... Pamphylia, in ancient geography, was the region in the south of Asia Minor, between Lycia and Cilicia, extending from the Mediterranean to Mount Taurus. ... Cassander (c. ... Location of Caria Caria (Greek Καρία; see also List of traditional Greek place names) was a region of Asia Minor, situated south of Ionia, and west of Phrygia and Lycia. ... Menander (in Greek MενανδρoÏ‚; lived 4th century BC) was an officer in the service of Alexander the Great. ... Lydia is a historic region of western Anatolia, congruent with Turkeys modern provinces of Ä°zmir and Manisa. ... Location of Phrygia - traditional region (yellow) - expanded kingdom (orange line) In antiquity, Phrygia was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolian Highland, part of modern Turkey. ... Leonnatus (356 BC - 322 BC), Macedonian officer of Alexander the Great and one of the diadochi. ... Thrace (Greek Θράκη, ThrákÄ“, Latin: Thracia or Threcia, Turkish Trakya, Bulgarian Тракия, Trakiya) is a historical and geographic area in southeast Europe. ... Map of the Black Sea. ... Lysimachus (c. ... Cappadocia in 188 BC In ancient geography, Cappadocia (Greek: Καππαδοκία; see also List of traditional Greek place names; Turkish Kapadokya) was an extensive inland district of Asia Minor (modern Turkey). ... Paphlagonia was an ancient area on the Black Sea coast of north central Anatolia, situated between Bithynia and Pontus, and separated from Phrygia (later, Galatia) by a prolongation to the east of the Bithynian Olympus. ... Eumenes of Cardia (c. ... Silver coin of Seleucus. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... Cassander (c. ... Antipater (in Greek Αντίπατρος; lived c. ... Hydaspes is the ancient Greek name for the modern-day Jhelum river. ... The Indus River in Northern Areas of Pakistan, near the rock Aornus. ... Taxiles (in Greek Tαξιλης; lived 4th century BC) was a prince or king, who reigned over the tract between the Indus and the Hydaspes rivers, in the Punjab at the period of the expedition of Alexander the Great, 327 BC. His real name was Ambhi, and the Greeks appear to... Peithon, son of Agenor (?-312 BCE) was an officer in the expedition of Alexander the Great to India, who became satrap of the Indus from 325 to 316 BCE, and then satrap of Babylon, from 316 to 312 BCE, until he died at the Battle of Gaza in 312 BCE... The Paropamisadae is an ancient area of the Hindu-Kush, in the Eastern part of Afghanistan. ... Arachosia is the ancient name of an area that corresponds to the southern part of today s Afghanistan, around the city of Kandahar. ... Gedrosia is the ancient name of an area that corresponds to the southernwestern part of today s Pakistan, from the Indus River to the areas of Baluchistan and Makran. ... Sibyrtius (in Greek ΣιβυρτιoÏ‚; lived 4th century BC) was a Macedonian officer in the service of Alexander the Great, who was appointed by him, on his return from India (326 BC), governor of the province of Carmania. ... Stasanor (in Greek Στασανωρ; lived 4th century BC) was a native of Soli in Cyprus who held a distinguished position among the officers of Alexander the Great. ... It has been suggested that Ta-Hsia be merged into this article or section. ... Sogdiana (Sug`ud,Sug`diyona - Uzbek, Sughd - Tajik, Sugdiane, Old Persian Sughuda, Persian:سغد, Chinese: Sute 粟特) was an ancient civilization of Iranian peoples, then was a province of the Achaemenian Empire, the eighteenth in the list in the Behistun Inscription of Darius the Great (i. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Philip (in Greek ΦιλιππoÏ‚; died 318 BC) was satrap of Sogdiana, to which government he was first appointed by Alexander the Great himself in 327 BC. He retained his post, as did most of the satraps of the more remote provinces, in the arrangements which followed the death of the... Gorgan (گرگان); Hyrcania ; Hyrcana (Old Persian Varkâna, land of wolves; modern Persian Gorgan): part of the ancient Persian empire, on the southern shores of the Caspian Sea (present day Golestan, Mazandaran, Gilan and parts of Turkmenistan). ... Phrataphernes (in Greek Φραταφερνης; lived 4th century BC) was a Persian who held the government of Parthia and Hyrcania, under the king Darius III Codomannus, and joined that monarch with the contingents from the provinces subject to his rule, shortly before the battle of Gaugamela, 331 BC. He afterwards accompanied the... Tlepolemus (in Greek TληπoλεμoÏ‚; lived 4th century BC) was the son of Pythophanes and one of the etairoi, or body-guard of Alexander the Great, who was joined in the government of the Parthians and Hyrcanii with Amminapes, a Parthian, whom Alexander had appointed satrap of those provinces. ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... Peucestas (in Greek Πευκεστας;lived 4th century BC) was son of Alexander, a native of the town of Mieza, in Macedonia, and a distinguished officer in the service of Alexander the Great. ... Babylonia, named for its capital city, Babylon, was an ancient state in the south part of Mesopotamia (in modern Iraq), combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... Archon (ib Greek Aρχων; lived 4th century BC) was a Pellaean appointed satrap of Babylonia after the death of Alexander the Great, 323 BC.1, is probably the same as the son of Cleinias mentioned in the Indian expedition of Alexander. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC - 320s BC - 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 325 BC 324 BC 323 BC 322 BC 321 BC - 320 BC - 319 BC 318 BC 317...


 
 

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