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Encyclopedia > Parti Québécois
Parti Québécois
Active Provincial Party
Founded October 11, 1968
Leader Bernard Landry
President Monique Richard
Headquarters 1200 Papineau Avenue
Suite 150
Montreal, Quebec
H2K 4R5
Political ideology Sovereigntism, Nationalism & Social democracy
International alignment None
Colours Blue (also White & Red)
Website www.pq.org

The Parti Québécois or PQ is a centre-left political party that advocates national sovereignty for Quebec from Canada. It officially advocates social democracy and has traditionally had support from the labour movement though unlike other social democratic parties it has no formal ties with labour. Members and supporters of the PQ are sometimes called Péquistes (pronounced /peˈkists/ -- a word derived from the French pronunciation of the party's initials). The Parti Québécois logo. ... October 11 is the 284th day of the year (285th in Leap years). ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Bernard Landry official 2003 election picture. ... {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: Concordia Salus (Salvation through harmony) Ville de Montréal, Québec, Canada Location. ... ... The Quebec sovereignty movement is a movement calling for the attainment of sovereignty for Quebec, a province of the Canadian federation. ... Nationalism is an ethno-political ideology that sustains the concept of a nation-identity for an exclusive group of people. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... Blue (from Old High German blao shining) is one of the three primary additive colors; blue light has the shortest wavelength range (about 420-490 nm) of the three primary colors. ... White is a color (more accurately it contains all the colors of the spectrum and is sometimes described as an achromatic color—black is the absence of color) that has high brightness but zero hue. ... Red is a color at the lowest frequencies of light discernible by the human eye. ... A political party is a political organization that subscribes to a certain ideology and seeks to attain political power within a government. ... Nationalism is an ethno-political ideology that sustains the concept of a nation-identity for an exclusive group of people. ... ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... The labor movement (or labour movement) is a broad term for the development of a collective organization of working people, to campaign in their own interest for better treatment from their employers and political governments. ...

Contents

History

The PQ is the result of the 1968 merger between René Lévesque's Mouvement souveraineté-association and the Ralliement national. Following the creation of the PQ, the Rassemblement pour l'indépendance nationale held a general assembly that voted to dissolve the RIN. Its former members were invited to join the new Parti Québécois. 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... René Lévesque. ... The Mouvement Souveraineté-Association (MSA, or Movement for Sovereignty-Association) was formed on November 19, 1967 by René Lévesque to promote the concept of sovereignty-association between Quebec and the rest of Canada. ... The Ralliement national was political party that advocated the political independence of Quebec from Canada in the 1960s. ... Pierre Bourgault speaks as leader of the Rassemblement pour lIndépendance Nationale. ...


The PQ's primary goals were and still are to obtain the political, economic and social independence for the Quebec political nation. In the 1976 provincial election, the Parti Québécois was elected to form the government of Quebec. The party's leader, René Lévesque, became the Premier of Quebec. This was cause for celebration among many French-speaking Quebecers, but resulted in panic and a mass exodus among many of the province's anglophone and minority workers and business people. A nation is an imagined community of people created by a national ideology, to which certain norms and behavior are usually attributed. ... The Quebec general election of 1976 was held on November 15, 1976 to elect members to National Assembly of the Province of Quebec, Canada. ... The Premier of Quebec (in French Premier ministre du Québec, sometimes literally translated to Prime Minister of Quebec) is the first minister for the Canadian province of Quebec. ... This article describes the Canadian province. ...


The first PQ government was known as the "republic of teachers" because of the large number of PQ Members of the National Assembly of Quebec (MNAs) who taught at the university level. The PQ was the first government to recognize the First Peoples' right to self-determination. The PQ passed laws on public consultations and the financing of political parties, which insured equal financing of political parties and limited contributions by individuals to $3000. However, the most important legacy of the PQ is the Charter of the French Language (the so-called Bill 101), a framework law which defines the linguistic primacy of French and seeks to make French the common public language of Quebec. Critics, both francophone and anglophone, have however criticized the charter for restraining citizens' linguistic school choice, as it forbids immigrants and Quebecers of French descent from attending English-language schools. The Quebec Parliament Building at night The National Assembly of Québec (French: Assemblée nationale du Québec) is the legislative body of the Province of Quebec, Canada. ... First Peoples is a term used in Canada as an alternative to Native Americans to refer to the First Nations, the Inuit, and the Métis, collectively. ... The Charter of the French Language (also known as Bill 101) is a framework law in the province of Quebec, Canada, defining the linguistic rights of all Quebecers and making French, the language of the majority, the sole official language of Quebec. ...


The Parti Québécois has initiated two referendums to begin negotiation for independence. The 1980 Quebec referendum on sovereignty association was rejected by 60 per cent of voters. A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Negotiation is the process whereby interested parties resolve disputes, agree upon courses of action, bargain for individual or collective advantage, and/or attempt to craft outcomes which serve their mutual interests. ... The 1980 Quebec referendum was the first referendum in Quebec that put to public vote the role of Quebec within Canada and whether Quebec should pursue a path toward independent statehood (sovereignty). The referendum was called by Quebecs governing party, the Parti Québécois (PQ), which strongly favoured secession. ... Quebec The Quebec sovereignty movement is a movement calling for the attainment of sovereignty for Quebec, a province of the country of Canada. ...


With the failure of the Charlottetown Accord and the Meech Lake Accord, two packages of proposed amendments to the Canadian constitution, the question of Quebec's status remained unresolved, and the PQ called the 1995 Quebec referendum proposing negotiations on sovereignty. It was rejected by a slim margin, less than one per cent. On the night of the defeat, Premier Jacques Parizeau stated that the loss was caused by "money and the ethnic vote" as well as by the divided votes amongst francophones. Parizeau resigned the next day (as he had planned beforehand in case of a defeat). The Charlottetown Accord was a package of constitutional amendments, proposed by the Canadian federal and provincial governments in 1992. ... The Meech Lake Accord was a set of failed constitutional amendments to the Constitution of Canada proposed by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and Robert Bourassa, premier of Quebec. ... The Constitution of Canada is the supreme law in Canada. ... The 1995 Quebec referendum was the second referendum in Quebec (see 1980 Quebec referendum) that put to public vote the role of Quebec within Canada and whether Quebec should pursue a path toward independent statehood (sovereignty). The referendum was the culmination of years of rising support for autonomy (see Quiet... Portrait of Jacques Parizeau. ... After the narrow 50. ...


Lucien Bouchard, founder of the Bloc Québécois, a sovereigntist party at the federal level, succeeded Parizeau as PQ leader, but chose not to call another referendum due to the absence of "winning conditions". Bouchard's government then engaged in massive cuts in social programs in order to balance the provincial budget. The PQ won another term in 1998, and continued with this program. Bouchard resigned in 2001, and was succeeded as PQ leader and Quebec premier by Bernard Landry, a former PQ Finance minister. Under Landry's leadership, the party lost the 2003 Quebec election to Jean Charest's Quebec Liberal Party. Lucien Bouchard official Quebec government picture. ... The Bloc Québécois is a federal political party in Canada that is primarily devoted to promoting sovereignty for the province of Quebec. ... Bernard Landry official 2003 election picture. ... (Redirected from 2003 Quebec election) In the Quebec general election on April 14, 2003, the Quebec Liberal Party under Jean Charest defeated the incumbent Parti Québécois under Bernard Landry. ... Portrait of Jean J. Charest. ... The Parti libéral du Québec (Liberal Party of Quebec), or PLQ, is a liberal political party in the Canadian province of Quebec. ...


Summer and fall 2004 were difficult seasons for Bernard Landry's leadership which is being widely contested. A vote will be held during the party's June 2005 convention to determine whether Landry continues to have the confidence of the party membership.


After gaining only 76,2% approval on the confidence vote from party membership on June 4th, 2005, Bernard Landry resigned.


Brother party

The Bloc Québécois is a Canadian political party at the federal level that was founded in 1990 by future PQ leader Lucien Bouchard. It holds close ties to the Parti Québécois, and shares its two principal objectives: sovereignty and social democracy. The two parties frequently share political candidates, and support each other during election campaigns. They have a similar membership and voter base. Prominent members of either party often attend and speak at both organizations' public events. The current Bloc leader, Gilles Duceppe, is also the son of Jean Duceppe, a famous Quebec actor who helped found the PQ. Jean Duceppe also helped found the New Democratic Party branch in Quebec, which later separated from the federal NDP and merged into the Union des Forces Progressistes (UFP), which gathered 1.0% of the provincial vote during the 2004 election, twice the number of the closest fourth party (the Bloc Pot, with 0.5% of vote turnout in 2004). The Bloc Québécois is a federal political party in Canada that is primarily devoted to promoting sovereignty for the province of Quebec. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lucien Bouchard official Quebec government picture. ... Sovereignty is the exclusive right to exercise supreme authority over a geographic region, group of people, or ones self. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... Gilles Duceppe Gilles Duceppe, PC (b. ... Jean Duceppe is a Canadian actor, and the father of sovereigntist Canadian politician Gilles Duceppe. ... The New Democratic Party (NDP) (French: Nouveau Parti démocratique (NPD)) is a social democratic political party in Canada. ... The Parti de la Democratie Socialiste (PDS) (in English: Party of Socialist Democracy) was a political party in Quebec, Canada. ... The Union des forces progressistes (UFP) is a left wing political party in Quebec, Canada. ... The Bloc pot is a political party in the Canadian province of Quebec that is dedicated to the legalization of marijuana. ...


Leaders of the Parti Québécois

René Lévesque. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pierre-Marc Johnson (b. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Portrait of Jacques Parizeau. ... 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Lucien Bouchard official Quebec government picture. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bernard Landry official 2003 election picture. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Elections and slogans

  • 1970: OUI - Yes
  • 1973: J'ai le goût du Québec - I have the taste for Quebec
  • 1976: On a besoin d'un vrai gouvernement - We need a real government [won power]
  • 1981: Faut rester forts au Québec - We must remain strong in Quebec [remained in power]
  • 1985: Le Québec avec Johnson - Quebec with Johnson
  • 1989: Je prends le parti du Québec - I'm taking the party of Quebec / I'm choosing Quebec (double meaning)
  • 1994: L'autre façon de gouverner - The other way of governing [won power]
  • 1998: J'ai confiance - I have confidence [remained in power]
  • 2003: Restons forts - Let's stay strong

In the Quebec general election on April 29, 1970, the Quebec Liberal Party under Robert Bourassa defeated the incumbent Union Nationale under Jean-Jacques Bertrand. ... In the Quebec general election on October 29, 1973, the incumbent Quebec Liberal Party under Robert Bourassa won re-election, defeating the Parti Québécois under René Lévesque and the Union Nationale. ... The Quebec general election of 1976 was held on November 15, 1976 to elect members to National Assembly of the Province of Quebec, Canada. ... In the Quebec general election on April 13, 1981, the incumbent Parti Québécois under René Lévesque won re-election, defeating the Quebec Liberal Party under Claude Ryan. ... In the Quebec general election on December 2, 1985, the Quebec Liberal Party under Robert Bourassa defeated the incumbent Parti Québécois under Pierre-Marc Johnson. ... In the Quebec general election on September 25, 1989, the incumbent Quebec Liberal Party under Robert Bourassa won re-election, defeating the Parti Québécois under Jacques Parizeau. ... Categories: Stub | Quebec general elections ... Categories: Stub | Quebec general elections ... Map of Quebecs ridings and how they voted by percentage The Quebec general election of 2003 was held on April 14, 2003, to elect members of the National Assembly of Quebec (Canada). ...

Election results

General election # of candidates # of seats won % of popular vote
1970 108 7 23.06%
1973 110 6 30.22%
1976 110 71 41.37%
1981 122 80 49.26%
1985 122 26 38.69%
1989 125 29 40.16%
1994 125 77 44.75%
1998 124 76 42.87%
2003 125 45 33.24%

See also

This is an article about the politics of the Province of Quebec, Canada. ... This is a list of Quebec general elections since Confederation in 1867, when Quebec became a province of the Dominion of Canada. ... This is a list of the Premiers of Quebec, Canada since Confederation (1867). ... This is a list of the leaders of the Opposition of Quebec, Canada since Confederation (1867). ... The Quebec Parliament Building at night The National Assembly of Québec (French: Assemblée nationale du Québec) is the legislative body of the Province of Quebec, Canada. ... This article presents a detailed timeline of Quebec history both as part of the British Empire and the Dominion of Canada. ... This article lists political parties in Canada. ... René Lévesque. ... A number of events and strategies have punctuated the history of the Quebec sovereigntist movement. ... Quebec nationalism is the subject of many international studies together with the contemporary nationalism of Scotland, Catalonia and other non-sovereign regions of the world. ... Quebec The Quebec sovereignty movement is a movement calling for the attainment of sovereignty for Quebec, a province of the country of Canada. ... Secessionist movements of Canada Movements seeking independence from Canada Quebec Quebec Sovereignism seeks independence from Canada for the province of Quebec. ...

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