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Encyclopedia > Parnassian poets
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The Parnassians were a group of 19th-century French poets, so called from their journal, the Parnasse contemporain, itself named after Mount Parnassus, home of the Muses in Greek mythology. Issued from 1866 to 1876, it included poems by Charles Leconte de Lisle, Théodore de Banville, Sully-Prudhomme, Paul Verlaine, François Coppée and José María de Heredia. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) Vagina The 19th century lasted from 1801 through 1900 in the Gregorian calendar. ... A poet is someone who writes poetry. ... A journal (through French from late Latin diurnalis, daily) has several related meanings: a daily record of events or business; a private journal is usually referred to as a diary. ... Mount Parnassus is a mountain of barren limestone in central Greece that towers above Delphi, north of the Gulf of Corinth, and offers scenic views of the surrounding olive groves and countryside. ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek Μουσαι, Mousai : from a root meaning mountain) are nine goddesses who embody the right evocation of myth, inspired through remembered and improvised song and traditional music and dances. ... The Oricoli bust of Zeus, King of the Gods, in the collection of the Vatican Museum. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Charles-Marie-René Leconte de Lisle (October 22, 1818 - July 17, 1894), was a French poet of the Parnassian movement. ... Theodore Faullain de Banville (March 14, 1823 – March 15, 1891) was a French poet and writer. ... Prudhomme René-François-Armand (Sully) Prudhomme (Paris, France, March 16, 1839 - Châtenay-Malabry, France, September 6, 1907) was a French poet and essayist, winner of the first Nobel Prize in Literature, 1901. ... Paul Verlaine illustrated in the frontispiece of , 1902 Paul Marie Verlaine (March 30, 1844 – January 8, 1896) is considered one of the greatest and most popular of French poets. ... François Coppée François Edouard Joachim Coppée (January 12, 1842 - May 23, 1908), was a French poet and novelist. ... José María de Heredia (November 22, 1842 - October 3, 1905), French poet, the modern master of the French sonnet, was born at Fortuna Cafeyere, near Santiago de Cuba, being in blood part Spanish Creole and part French. ...


The Parnassians were influenced by Théophile Gautier and his doctrine of art for art's sake. In reaction to the looser forms of romantic poetry, they strove for exact and faultless workmanship, selecting exotic and classical subjects which they treated with rigidity of form and emotional detachment. Elements of this detachment were derived from the philosophical work of Arthur Schopenhauer. Pierre Jules Théophile Gautier (August 30, 1811 – October 23, 1872) was a French poet, dramatist, novelist, journalist, and literary critic. ... Art for arts sake is the usual English rendition of a French slogan, lart pour lart, which is credited to Théophile Gautier (1811–1872). ... Arthur Schopenhauer (February 22, 1788 – September 21, 1860) was a German philosopher. ...


Parnassianism did not restrict itself to France, though. Perhaps the most idiosyncratic of Parnassians, Olavo Bilac was an author from Brazil who managed to carefully craft verses and metre while still keeping a strong feel of emotion to them. Olavo Braz Martins dos Guimarães Bilac (December 16, 1865 – December 28, 1918) was a Brazilian poet of the Parnassian school. ...


Gerard Manley Hopkins used the term Parnassian to describe competent but uninspired poetry, where a talented poet is merely operating on auto-pilot. He identified this trend particularly in the work of Alfred Tennyson, citing the poem Enoch Arden as an example. Gerard Manley Hopkins (July 28, 1844 - June 8, 1889) was a British Victorian poet and Jesuit priest. ... Lord Tennyson, Poet Laureate Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (August 6, 1809 - October 6, 1892) is generally regarded as one of the greatest English poets. ... Enoch Arden is the hero of a poem by Tennyson, who finds, on his return from the sea, after long absence, his wife, who believed him dead, married happily to another; does not disclose himself, and dies broken-hearted. ...


French Parnassianism had a decisive influence on the Latin American literary current known as Modernismo, whose leading light was the notable Nicaraguan poet, Rubén Darío. Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Modernismo is Spanish for modernism, however the term Modernismo indicates a more specific art movement: Modernismo, also known by its Catalan name Modernisme, as term in architecture generally refers to the pre-Art Nouveau style existing; e. ... Félix Rubén García Sarmiento (January 18, 1867 – February 6, 1916) was a Nicaraguan poet who wrote under the pseudonym of Rubén Darío. ...


See also


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Glossary of Poetic Terms from BOB'S BYWAY, Letter P (3309 words)
Sidelight: The successful poet must be a diligent student of language -- sensitive to sounds and rhythms -- and a student of technique, through the knowledge of what forms of expression have worked effectively for other poets, past and present, in order to develop, master, and expand his or her art.
While most often used to describe the poet's liberty to depart from prosaic diction and standard syntactical structures to achieve a desired effect, poetic license also includes the freedom for creative deviations from historical fact in the subject matter, such as the use of anachronisms.
A poet honored for his artistic achievement or selected as most representative of his country or area; in England, a court official appointed by the sovereign, whose original duties included the composition of odes in honor of the sovereign's birthday and in celebration of State occasions of importance.
Parnassian poets - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (179 words)
The Parnassians were a group of 19th-century French poets, so called from their journal, the Parnasse contemporain, itself named after Mount Parnassus, home of the Muses in Greek mythology.
The Parnassians were influenced by Théophile Gautier and his doctrine of art for art's sake.
Perhaps the most idiosyncratic of Parnassians, Olavo Bilac was an author from Brazil that managed to carefully craft verses and metre while still keeping a strong feel of emotion to them.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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