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Encyclopedia > Parliament of Malaysia
Malaysia

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Malaysia
Image File history File links MalaysianParliament. ... Image File history File links MalaysianParliament. ... The Parliament building The Malaysian Houses of Parliament is where the Malaysian legislative arm assemble. ... Flag Seal Nickname: KL Motto: Maju dan makmur (Malay: Peace and progress) Location Location in Malaysia Coordinates: Government Country State Malaysia Federal Territory Establishment 1857 (Granted city status in 1974) Mayor Ruslin Hasan Geographical characteristics Area 243. ... Image File history File links Msia-crest. ... Politics of Malaysia takes place in a framework of a federal parliamentary monarchy, whereby the Prime Minister of Malaysia is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ...



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The Parliament of Malaysia is the national legislature of Malaysia, based on the Westminster system of Parliament. It consists of the Dewan Rakyat (House of Representatives or literally People's Hall, in Malay) and the Dewan Negara (Nation's Hall in Malay; however, it is commonly referred to as the Senate). Members of the Dewan Rakyat are known as members of Parliament (MPs) while members of the Dewan Negara are called senators. The social contract in Malaysia refers to the agreement made by the countrys founding fathers in the Constitution. ... Flag of the Supreme Head of Malaysia Yang di-Pertuan Agong, a Malay title usually translated as Supreme Head, Supreme Ruler or Paramount Ruler, is the official title of the constitutional head of state of the federation of Malaysia. ... In full, Tuanku Syed Sirajuddin ibni Almarhum Tuanku Syed Putra Jamalullail (born 1943) is the Yang di-Pertuan Agong (roughly equivalent to King) of Malaysia, and Raja of Perlis. ... The Cabinet of Malaysia is the executive branch of Malaysias government. ... The Prime Minister of Malaysia is the indirectly elected head of government of Malaysia. ... Dato Seri Abdullah bin Haji Ahmad Badawi (born November 26, 1939) is the current prime minister of Malaysia, succeeding Tun Dr. Mahathir bin Mohamad. ... Deputy Prime Minister of Malaysia (Timbalan Perdana Menteri in Malay) is the second highest political post in Malaysia. ... The Dewan Negara is the Malaysian Senate. ... The Parliament of Malaysia consists of the lower house (Dewan Rakyat or literally Peoples Hall, in Malay) and upper house (Dewan Negara or Nations Hall in Malay). ... This article is about the Courts of Malaysia. ... The Opposition in Malaysia is a term used to describe political parties represented in the Parliament of Malaysia that is not in government either on its own or as part of a governing coalition. ... Elections in Malaysia gives information on election and election results in Malaysia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Political parties in Malaysia lists political parties in Malaysia. ... Malaysia is a federation of 13 states. ... This article concerns the Foreign relations of Malaysia. ... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... A legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... The Westminster system is a democratic system of government modelled after that of the United Kingdom system, as used in the Palace of Westminster, the location of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... States currently utilizing parliamentary systems are denoted in orange and red—the former being constitutional monarchies where authority is vested in a parliament, and the latter being parliamentary republics whose parliaments are effectively supreme over a separate head of state. ... The Parliament of Malaysia consists of the lower house (Dewan Rakyat or literally Peoples Hall, in Malay) and upper house (Dewan Negara or Nations Hall in Malay). ... The Malay language, also known locally as Bahasa Melayu or Bahasa Malaysia, is an Austronesian language spoken by the Malay people who reside in the Malay Peninsula, southern Thailand, the Philippines, Singapore, central eastern Sumatra, the Riau islands, and parts of the coast of Borneo. ... The Dewan Negara is the Malaysian Senate. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... A senate is a deliberative body, often the upper house or chamber of a legislature. ...


A general election is held every four or five years to elect representatives to the Dewan Rakyat; members of the Dewan Negara, like those of the House of Lords in the United Kingdom, are appointed. Members of Parliament are commonly referred to as MPs. Malaysian law requires that a general election must be held at least once every five years. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ...


The Parliament assembles in the Malaysian Houses of Parliament, located in the national capital city of Kuala Lumpur. The Parliament building The Malaysian Houses of Parliament is where the Malaysian legislative arm assemble. ... Flag Seal Nickname: KL Motto: Maju dan makmur (Malay: Peace and progress) Location Location in Malaysia Coordinates: Government Country State Malaysia Federal Territory Establishment 1857 (Granted city status in 1974) Mayor Ruslin Hasan Geographical characteristics Area 243. ...

Contents


History

Historically, none of the states forming the Federation of Malaysia had parliaments before independence. Although the British colonial government had permitted the forming of legislative councils for Malaya, Singapore, Sabah and Sarawak, these were not the supreme makers of law, and remained subordinate to the British High Commissioner. The Reid Commission, which drafted the Constitution of Malaya — Malaya gained independence in 1957, ahead of the other states that would later form Malaysia — modelled the Malayan system of government after that of Britain's, with a bicameral parliament, one house being directly elected, and the other being appointed by the King — just like the British House of Commons and House of Lords. Originally Parliament had no specific place to convene until with the completion of Parliament House in 1962, which comprises a three-storey main building for the two houses of Parliament to meet, and an 18-storey tower for the offices of Ministers and members of Parliament. [1] The Federal Legislative Council was the legislative body of Federation of Malaya and the predecessor the the Malaysian Parliament. ... Map of Peninsular Malaysia Peninsular Malaysia (Malay: Semenanjung Malaysia) is the part of Malaysia which lies on the Malay Peninsula, and shares a land border with Thailand in the north. ... State motto: Sabah Maju Jaya Capital Kota Kinabalu Governor Tun Haji Ahmadshah Abdullah Chief Minister Hj. ... State motto: United, Industrious, Dedicated (Malay: Bersatu, Berusaha, Berbakti ) Capital Kuching Governor T.Y.T Tun Datuk Patinggi Abang Muhammad Salahuddin Chief Minister Y.A.B. Datuk Patinggi Tan Sri Haji Abdul Taib Bin Mahmud / Pehin Sri Dr. Hj. ... The Reid Commission was an independent commission responsible in drafting the Federation of Malayan Constitution prior to the Malayan independence from Britain on 31 August 1957. ... The Constitution of Malaysia, comprising more than 180 articles, is the supreme law of Malaysia. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ...


In 1963, when Malaya merged with Singapore, Sabah and Sarawak to form Malaysia, the Malayan Parliament became the Parliament of Malaysia, following the same system as before. Originally under the 1957 Constitution, most Senators were elected by the state assemblies in order to provide representation of state interests; changes to the Constitution in 1963 saw each state receiving two members, with the rest (including members for federal territories) being appointed by the King on the advice of the Cabinet.[2] When Singapore seceded from Malaysia in 1965, its Legislative Assembly became Parliament, and it ceased to be represented in the Parliament of Malaysia. This article is about the term as used within the Commonwealth of Nations; there is also an Legislative Assembly in Oregon and there used to be a Legislative Assembly in France during the French Revolution. ... The unicameral Parliament of Singapore is the legislature of Singapore with the President as its head [1]. It currently consists of 94 Members of Parliament. ...


Parliament has been suspended only once in the history of Malaysia, in the aftermath of the May 13 racial riots in 1969. From 1969 to 1971 — when Parliament reconvened — the nation was run by the National Operations Council (NOC). The May 13 Incident saw numerous cases of arson in the Malaysian capital city of Kuala Lumpur. ... The National Operations Council was an emergency administrative body which attempted to restore law and order in Malaysia during the race riots in 1967. ...


Debates in Parliament are broadcast on radio and television occasionally, such as during the tabling of a budget. Proposals from the opposition to broadcast all debates live have been repeatedly rejected by the government; in one instance, a Minister said that the government was concerned over the poor conduct of the opposition as being inappropriate for broadcasting. The prohibitive cost (RM100,000 per sitting) was also cited as a reason. [3] Budget generally refers to a list of all planned expenses and revenues. ... Ringgit (Malay for jagged) mostly refers to the Malaysian ringgit, which is the local currency in Malaysia, but it can also refer to the Singapore dollar and Brunei dollar in the Malay language. ...


Scope

As the ultimate legislative body in Malaysia, Parliament is responsible for passing, amending and repealing acts of law. It is subordinate to the Head of State, the Yang di-Pertuan Agong (King), under Article 39 of the Constitution. [4] Flag of the Supreme Head of Malaysia Yang di-Pertuan Agong, a Malay title usually translated as Supreme Head, Supreme Ruler or Paramount Ruler, is the official title of the constitutional head of state of the federation of Malaysia. ...


Parliament's members are permitted to speak on any subject without fear of censure outside Parliament; the only body that can censure an MP is the House Committee of Privileges. Such "Parliamentary immunity" takes effect from the moment a member of Parliament is sworn in, and only applies when that member has the floor; it does not apply to statements made outside the House. An exception to this rule are portions of the constitution related to the social contract, such as the Articles governing citizenship, Bumiputra (Malays and indigenous people) privileges, the Malay language, etc. — all public questioning of these provisions is illegal under the 1971 amendments to the Sedition Act, which Parliament passed in the wake of the 1969 May 13 racial riots.[5] Members of Parliament are also forbidden from criticising the King and judges. [6] Parliamentary immunity and other such privileges are set out by Article 63 of the Constitution; as such, the specific exceptions to such immunity had to be included in the Constitution by amendment after the May 13 incident. Parliamentary immunity is a system in which members of the parliament are granted partial immunity from prosecution. ... The social contract in Malaysia refers to the agreement made by the countrys founding fathers in the Constitution. ... Bumiputra or Bumiputera (Sanskrit, translated literally, it means sons of the Earth; Malay, translated literally, it means princes of the Earth), is an official definition widely used in Malaysia, embracing ethnic Malays as well as other indigenous ethnic groups. ... The May 13 Incident saw numerous cases of arson in the Malaysian capital city of Kuala Lumpur. ...


The executive government, comprising the Prime Minister and his Cabinet, is usually drawn from members of Parliament; most of its members are typically members of the Dewan Rakyat. After a general election or the resignation or death of a Prime Minister, the King selects the Prime Minister, who is the Head of Government but constitutionally subordinate to him, from the Dewan Rakyat. In practice, this is usually the leader of the largest party in Parliament. The Prime Minister then submits a list containing the names of members of his Cabinet, who will then be appointed as Ministers by the King. Members of the Cabinet must also be members of Parliament. If the Prime Minister loses the confidence of the Dewan Rakyat, whether by losing a no-confidence vote or failing to pass a budget, he must submit his resignation to the King, who will then appoint a new Prime Minister. The Cabinet formulates government policy and drafts bills, meeting in private. Its members must accept "collective responsibility" for the decisions the Cabinet makes, even if some members disagree with it; if they do not wish to be held responsible for Cabinet decisions, they must resign. Although the Constitution makes no provision for it, there is also a Deputy Prime Minister, who is the de facto successor of the Prime Minister should he die or be otherwise incapacitated. [4] The Prime Minister of Malaysia is the indirectly elected head of government of Malaysia. ... The Cabinet of Malaysia is the executive branch of Malaysias government. ... ... Budget generally refers to a list of all planned expenses and revenues. ...


Although the judiciary is constitutionally an independent branch of the government, after the 1988 constitutional crisis, the judiciary was made subject to Parliament; judicial powers are held by Parliament, and vested by it in the courts, instead of being directly held by the judiciary as before. The Attorney-General was also conferred the power to instruct the courts on what cases to hear, where they would be heard, and whether to discontinue a particular case. [7] The Sultan Abdul Samad Building housed the Supreme Court at the time of the 1988 Malaysian constitutional crisis. ...


Procedure

Parliament meets from Monday to Thursday when it is in session, as Friday is part of the weekend in certain states such as Kelantan. [8] State Motto: Berserah kepada Tuhan Kerajaan Kelantan (English : Submit to God, government of Kelantan Capital Kota Bharu Sultan Tuanku Ismail Petra ibni al-Marhum Sultan Yahya Petra Chief minister Tuan Guru Dato Haji Nik Aziz Nik Mat Area 14,922 km² Population 1. ...


A proposed act of law begins its life when a particular government minister or ministry prepares a first draft with the assistance of the Attorney-General's Department. The draft, known as a bill, is then discussed by the Cabinet. If it is agreed to be submitted to Parliament, the bill is distributed to all MPs. It then goes through three readings before the Dewan Rakyat. The first reading is where the minister or his deputy submits it to Parliament. At the second reading, the bill is discussed and debated by MPs. Until the mid-1970s, both English and Malay (the national language) were used for debates, but henceforth, only Malay was permitted, unless permission was obtained from the Speaker of the House. At the third reading, the minister or his deputy formally submit it to a vote for approval. A 2/3rds majority is usually required to pass the bill, but in certain cases, a simple majority suffices. Should the bill pass, it is sent to the Dewan Negara, where the three readings are carried out again. The Dewan Negara may choose not to pass the bill, but this only delays its passage by a month, or in some cases, a year; once this period expires, the bill is considered to have been passed by the house. [8] [9] The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Malay language, also known locally as Bahasa Melayu or Bahasa Malaysia, is an Austronesian language spoken by the Malay people who reside in the Malay Peninsula, southern Thailand, the Philippines, Singapore, central eastern Sumatra, the Riau islands, and parts of the coast of Borneo. ...


If the bill passes, it is presented to the Yang di-Pertuan Agong (King), who has 30 days to consider the bill. Should he disagree with it, he returns it to Parliament with a list of suggested amendments. Parliament must then reconsider the bill and its proposed amendments and return it to the King within 30 days if they pass it again. The King then has another 30 days to give the royal assent; otherwise, it passes into law. The law does not take effect until it is published in the Government Gazette. [10] Flag of the Supreme Head of Malaysia Yang di-Pertuan Agong, a Malay title usually translated as Supreme Head, Supreme Ruler or Paramount Ruler, is the official title of the constitutional head of state of the federation of Malaysia. ...


The government attempts to maintain top secrecy regarding bills debated; MPs generally receive copies of bills only a few days before they are debated, and newspapers are rarely provided with copies of the bills before they are debated. In some cases, such as a 1968 amendment to the Constitution, an MP may be presented with a bill to be debated on the same day it is tabled, and all three readings may be carried out that day itself. [11] In rare circumstances, the government may release a White paper containing particular proposals that will eventually be incorporated into a bill; this has been done for legislation such as the Universities and University Colleges Act. [12] A white paper is an authoritative report; a government report outlining policy; or a document whose purpose is to educate industry customers or collect leads for a company. ...


Although the process above assumes only the government can propose bills, there also exists a process for Private Member's Bills. However, as in most other legislatures following the Westminster System, few members of Parliament actually introduce bills. [13] To present a Private Member's Bill, the member in question must seek the leave of the House in question to debate the bill before it is moved. Originally, it was allowed to debate the bill in the process of seeking leave, but this process was discontinued by an amendment to the Standing Orders of Parliament. [14] It is also possible for members of the Dewan Negara (Senate) to initiate bills; however, only cabinet ministers are permitted to move finance-related bills, which must be tabled in the Dewan Rakyat. [15] A Private Members Bill is a proposed law introduced by a member of parliament, whether from the government or the opposition side, to that legislature or parliament. ... The Westminster system is a democratic system of government modelled after that of the United Kingdom system, as used in the Palace of Westminster, the location of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Dewan Negara is the Malaysian Senate. ...


It is often alleged that legislation proposed by the opposition parties, which must naturally be in the form of a Private Member's Bill, is not seriously considered by Parliament. Some have gone as far as to claim that the rights of members of Parliament to debate proposed bills have been severely curtailed by incidents such as an amendment of the Standing Orders that permitted the Speaker of the Dewan Rakyat to amend written copies of MPs' speeches before they were made. Nevertheless, it is admitted by some of these critics that "Government officials often face sharp questioning in Parliament, although this is not always reported in detail in the press." [7] The Speaker of the Dewan Rakyat (Malay: Yang di-Pertua Dewan Rakyat) is the presiding officer of the Dewan Rakyat, the lower house of the Parliament of Malaysia. ...


Relationship with the government

In theory, based on the Constitution of Malaysia, the government is accountable to Parliament. However, there has been substantial controversy over the independence of the Malaysian Parliament, with many viewing it simply as a rubber stamp, approving the executive branch's decisions. Constitutional scholar Shad Saleem Faruqi has calculated that 80% of all bills the government introduced from 1991 to 1995 were passed without a single amendment. According to him, another 15% were withdrawn due to pressure from non-governmental organisations (NGOs) or other countries, while only 5% were amended or otherwise altered by Parliament. Shad concludes that "the legislative process is basically an executive process, not a parliamentary process." [16] The Constitution of Malaysia, comprising more than 180 articles, is the supreme law of Malaysia. ... This article is about vulcanized rubber stamps. ... The executive is the branch of a government charged with implementing, or executing, the law and running the day-to-day affairs of the government or state. ... Shad Saleem Faruqi is a Malaysian professor of law and also serves as legal advisor at the Universiti Teknologi Mara in Shah Alam, Selangor. ... A non-governmental organization (NGO) is an organization which is not a part of a government. ...


Checks and balances

Theoretically, the executive branch of the government is held in check by the legislative and judiciary branches. Parliament largely exerts control on the government through question time, where MPs question members of the cabinet on government policy, and through Select Committees that are formed to look into a particular issue. This article is about the Courts of Malaysia. ... A Select Committee is a committee made up of a small number of parliamentary members appointed to deal with particular areas or issues originating in the Westminster System of parliamentary democracy. ...


Formally, Parliament exercises control over legislation and financial affairs. However, the legislature has been condemned as having a "tendency to confer wide powers on ministers to enact delegated legislation", and a substantial portion of the government's revenue is not under Parliament's purview; government-linked companies, such as Petronas, are generally not accountable to Parliament.[17] In his 1970 book The Malay Dilemma, future Prime Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad stated: "In the main, Parliamentary sittings were regarded as a pleasant formality which afforded members opportunities to be heard and quoted, but which would have absolutely no effect on the course of the Government. ... The sittings were a concession to a superfluous democratic practice. Its main value lay in the opportunity to flaunt Government strength."[18] Critics have regarded Parliament as a "safe outlet for the grievances of backbenchers or opposition members," and meant largely to "endorse government or ruling party proposals" rather than act as a check on them.[19] Delegated legislation (sometimes referred to as secondary legislation or subordinate legislation) is law made by ministers under powers given to them by parliamentary acts (primary legislation) in order to implement and administer the requirements of the acts. ... PETRONAS, short for Petroliam Nasional Berhad, is Malaysias owned oil and gas company that was founded on August 17, 1974. ... The Malay Dilemma is a controversial book written by Mahathir bin Mohamad in 1970. ... Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamad (born July 10, 1925) is the former Prime Minister of Malaysia. ...


There have been only six Select Committees formed since 1970, when Parliament reconvened after the May 13 Incident. Of these, three were formed between 2002 and 2005. Although question time exists for Parliament to check the power of the executive, it has been argued that the question time alloted for MPs to question the government on its policies is insufficient or ineffective. Shad has calculated that as each question time session lasts only an hour, at the most, twelve questions can be asked. Opposition Leader Lim Kit Siang of the Democratic Action Party (DAP) calculated that over the space of three days (from 10 October to 13 October 2005), only 32 questions were answered orally. Of these 32 questions, only nine or 28% percent were answered by the Ministers concerned. The rest were answered either by Deputy Ministers (41%) or Parliamentary Secretaries (31%). [16] [20] The May 13 Incident saw numerous cases of arson in the Malaysian capital city of Kuala Lumpur. ... Lim Kit Siang Lim Kit Siang (b. ... Democratic Action Party (DAP) logo The Democratic Action Party (DAP, Parti Tindakan Demokratik in Malay) is Malaysias largest secular and Socialist opposition party. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in Leap years). ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


However, Minister in the Prime Minister's Department in charge of Parliamentary Affairs Nazri Aziz stated in 2006 that question time would be expanded to 90 minutes later in the year. He also proposed televising question time; opposition lawmakers have proposed televising whole Parliamentary sessions on a regular basis before, but their suggestions were rejected by the Cabinet. It remains to be seen if Nazri's suggestion will be taken up.[21] Datuk Seri Mohamed Nazri Abdul Aziz is a Malay Malaysian politician from the United Malays National Organisation (UMNO), and is as of 2005 a Minister in the Prime Ministers Department. ...


Time is allocated for discussion of the annual budget after it is tabled by the government's representative (usually the Prime Minister); however, most MPs spend much of the time questioning the government on other issues. Shad contends that although about 20 days are given for discussion of the budget, "the budget debate is used to hit the government on the head about everything else other than the budget. From potholes to education policy to illegal immigrants."[16] Budget generally refers to a list of all planned expenses and revenues. ... Pothole can also be the sport of exploring vertical caves as a synonym of caving The city of Los Angeles is famous for its large potholes. ...


If Parliament votes to reject the budget, it is taken as a vote of no-confidence, forcing the government out of office. The government will then either have to reform itself with a new cabinet and possibly new Prime Minister, or call for a general election. As a result, Shad states that "MPs may criticise, they may have their say but the government will have its way" when it comes to the budget. [16] A Motion of No Confidence, also called Motion of Non Confidence is a parliamentary motion traditionally put before a parliament by the opposition in the hope of defeating or embarrassing a government. ...


With the judiciary, it is possible for the courts to declare a particular act of Parliament unconstitutional. However, this has never occurred. Parliament is not involved in the process of judicial appointments.[22] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into constitutionality. ...


Department of Parliament controversy

In early October of 2005 the Minister in the Prime Minister's Department in charge of parliamentary affairs, Nazri Aziz, announced the formation of a Department of Parliament to oversee its day-to-day running. The leader of the Opposition, Lim Kit Siang, immediately announced a "Save Parliament" campaign to "ensure that Parliament does not become a victim in the second most serious assault on the doctrine of separation of powers in the 48-year history of the nation". [23] Datuk Seri Mohamed Nazri Abdul Aziz is a Malay Malaysian politician from the United Malays National Organisation (UMNO), and is as of 2005 a Minister in the Prime Ministers Department. ... Lim Kit Siang Lim Kit Siang (b. ... The separation of powers (or trias politica, a term coined by French political thinker Montesquieu) is a model for the governance of the state. ...


Nazri soon backed down, saying he had meant an office (although he stated jabatan, which means department; pejabat is the Malay word for office) and not Department (Jabatan) of Parliament. The New Straits Times, a newspaper owned by the United Malays National Organisation (a key member of the ruling Barisan Nasional coalition) wrote in an editorial that "ministerial authority was established over Parliament the building" and not Parliament the institution and that "[i]f the new 'department' and its management and staff do their jobs well, the rakyat (people) would have even more of a right to expect their MPs to do theirs by turning up for Dewan sessions, preserving that quaint tradition of the quorum, on behalf of their constituencies." [24] The New Straits Times is a Malaysian English language newspaper. ... UMNO Flag The United Malays National Organisation, or UMNO, (Malay: Pertubuhan Kebangsaan Melayu Bersatu), is the largest political party in Malaysia and a founding member of the Barisan Nasional coalition, which has ruled the country uninterruptedly since its independence. ... Barisan Nasional (National Front or BN) is a political coalition in Malaysia. ...


Lim was dissatisfied with such a response and went ahead with a "Save Parliament" roundtable attended by several MPs (including Nazri) and non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Although Lim thanked Nazri (the only Barisan Nasional MP in attendance), he stated that the proposed department remained a threat to Parliament's independence, and had to be "seen in the context of the relentless erosion and diminution of parliamentary powers and functions by the Executive". In a statement, the roundtable found that "Nazri’s explanations were not convincing" and urged "Nazri to halt all implementation of the Cabinet decision to establish a Department or Office of Parliament until MPs and the civil society could approve and support the proposal". [25]


On October 13 in the Dewan Rakyat, Ahmad Shabery Cheek (BN MP for Kemaman) tabled a motion to reinstate the Parliamentary Services Act 1963 (which would provide for a parliamentary service independent of the Public Service Department currently handling parliamentary affairs) that had been repealed (upon the unilateral suggestion of then Speaker of the House, Zahir Ismail) in 1992. Ahmad Shabery demanded to know if the government would make the status of parliament as an independent institution clear, and stated that "Aside from nice flooring, chairs and walls, we don’t even have a library that can make us proud, no in-house outlet selling copies of different Acts that are passed in Parliament itself and no proper information centre." [26] October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years). ... Ahmad Shabery Cheek is a Malaysian politician and Member of Parliament for the seat of Kemaman in Terengganu. ... Kemaman is a district in Terengganu, Malaysia. ... The Parliamentary Services Act (PSA) 1963 is an act providing for the Parliament of Malaysia to conduct its own administration, staffing and financing. ...


Nazri responded that the motion would have to be referred to the House Committee for review. Shahrir Abdul Samad, chairman of the Barisan Nasional Backbenchers' Club, then insisted that the Act be immediately restored without being referred to the Committee, and called on all MPs who supported the motion to stand. Several immediately stood, with some Opposition MPs shouting "bangun, bangun" (stand up, stand up). Following Shahrir's lead, a majority of the BN MPs also stood, including some frontbenchers. However, several ministers, including Foreign Minister Syed Hamid Albar (who had supported repealing the Act in 1992) remained seated. Nazri then stated that the matter would remain with the Committee, as he did not want it dealt with in a slipshod manner. [26] Yang Berhormat Dato Shahrir Abdul Samad is a member of Parliament in Malaysia, and the chairman of the Barisan Nasional Back-Benchers Club. ... Datuk Seri Syed Hamid Albar (born January 15, 1944 in Kampong Malayu Air Hitam, Penang, Malaysia) is a politician from Malaysia. ...


The following day, Lim called on Kamaruddin Mohd Baria, who would have taken the post of Parliament Head of Administration, not to report for duty in his new post. Meanwhile, the Dewan Negara House Committee held a specially-convened meeting, which called on the government to revive the Act and to call off all moves to change the administrative structure of Parliament. The President of the Dewan Negara, Abdul Hamid Pawanteh, also stated that he had not been informed "at all" by the government regarding the new department or office of Parliament. Later the same day, Minister in the Prime Minister's Department Radzi Sheikh Ahmad stated that the government had agreed to revive the Act. [27]


However, on October 17, Nazri refused to budge on the issue of the new post of "Parliament Head of Administration" (which would make the current Parliamentary Secretary, who is accountable to Parliament and not the executive, redundant). He also stated that the Parliamentary Service Act would have to go through the Dewan Rakyat House Committee and endorsed by the Dewan Rakyat before being sent to the cabinet for approval. In his blog, Lim slammed Nazri for overlooking "the fact that when the Parliamentary Privilege Act was repealed in 1992, it was not at the recommendation of the Dewan Rakyat House Committee but merely at the unilateral request of the Speaker." [28] October 17 is the 290th (in leap years the 291st) day of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that Online diary be merged into this article or section. ...


Current composition

[discuss] – [edit]
Summary of the 21 March 2004 Dewan Rakyat (House of Representatives) election results
Votes % of vote Seats +/-
National Front (Barisan Nasional): 4,420,452 63.9 198 +51
   United Malays National Organization (Pertubuhan Kebangsaan Melayu Bersatu, UMNO) 2,483,249 35.9 109 +38
   Malaysian Chinese Association (Persatuan China Malaysia, MCA) 1,074,230 15.5 31 +2
   Malaysian Indian Congress (Kongres India Se-Malaysia, MIC) 221,546 3.2 9 +2
   Malaysian People's Movement Party (Parti Gerakan Rakyat Malaysia, Gerakan) 257,763 3.7 10 +4
   United Traditional Bumiputera Party (Parti Pesaka Bumiputera Bersatu, PBB) 383,664 5.5 11 +5
   Sarawak United People's Party (Parti Rakyat Bersatu Sarawak, SUPP) 6
   Sarawak United People's Party (Parti Rakyat Bersatu Sarawak, SUPP) 6
   Sarawak Progressive Democratic Party (Parti Demokratik Progresif Sarawak, SAPP) 4
   United Sabah Party (Parti Bersatu Sabah, PBS) 4
   United Pasokmomogun Kadazandusun Murut Organisation (Pertubuhan Pasok Momogun Kadazandusun Bersatu, UPKO) 4
   Sabah Progressive Party (Parti Maju Sabah, SAPP) 2
   United Sabah People's Party (Parti Bersatu Rakyat Sabah) 1
   People's Progressive Party (Parti Progresif Penduduk Malaysia, PPP) 1
   Liberal Democratic Party (Parti Liberal Demokratik, LDP) -
Democratic Action Party (Parti Tindakan Demokratik, DAP) 687,340 9.9 12 +2
Alternative Front (Barisan Alternatif) coalition: 1,668,998 24.1 8 -24
   Islamic Party of Malaysia (Parti Islam SeMalaysia, PAS) 1,051,480 15.2 7 -20
   People's Justice Party (Parti Keadilan Rakyat, PKR) 617,518 8.9 1 -4
Non partisans (and others) 139,438 2.1 1 -2
Overall total 6,916,138 100.0 219 +26
Source: The Star, Kuala Lumpur
Dewan Negara
Mode of Appointment Seats
By King 44
By State Rep. 26
Total 70

General elections were held in Malaysia on March 21, 2004. ... The Parliament of Malaysia consists of the lower house (Dewan Rakyat or literally Peoples Hall, in Malay) and upper house (Dewan Negara or Nations Hall in Malay). ... Barisan Nasional (National Front or BN) is a political coalition in Malaysia. ... The United Malays National Organisation (UMNO), Pertubuhan Kebangsaan Melayu Bersatu in Malay, is the largest political party in Malaysia and a founding member of the Barisan Nasional coalition, which has ruled the country uninterrupted since independence. ... MCA Logo The Malaysian Chinese Association (Persatuan Cina Malaysia, MCA) (Simplified Chinese: 马华公会; pinyin: Mǎ Huá Gōng Huì; Cantonese: Ma Wah Koong Wui) is a political party in Malaysia, made up of Chinese Malaysian and one of the three major parties that make up the ruling Barisan Nasional, or National... The Malaysian Indian Congress (MIC) was established in August 1946 at the end of World War II. It was established in the cause of the communitys struggle during the inter-war years, to end British colonial rule, as well as in the need for representation on behalf of the... The Malaysian Peoples Movement Party (Parti Gerakan Rakyat Malaysia) formed on 24th March 1968, is a liberal party in Malaysia. ... The United Traditional Bumiputera Party (Parti Pesaka Bumiputera Bersatu) is a political party in Malaysia. ... The Sarawak United Peoples Party (Parti Rakyat Bersatu Sarawak) is a political party in Malaysia. ... The Sarawak United Peoples Party (Parti Rakyat Bersatu Sarawak) is a political party in Malaysia. ... Sarawak Progressive Democratic Party is a political party in Malaysia. ... The Parti Bersatu Sabah (United Sabah Party) is a political party in Malaysia. ... The United Pasokmomogun Kadazandusun Murut Organisation is a political party based in Sabah, east Malaysia. ... The Sabah Progressive Party (Parti Majuh Sabah) is a political party in Sabah, Malaysia. ... The Parti Bersatu Rakyat Sabah (United Sabah Peoples Party) is a political party in Malaysia. ... The Peoples Progressive Party (Parti Progresif Penduduk Malaysia) is a political party in Malaysia. ... The Liberal Democratic Party (Parti Liberal Demokratik) is a Chinese minority political party in Sabah, Malaysia. ... Democratic Action Party (DAP) logo The Democratic Action Party (DAP, Parti Tindakan Demokratik in Malay) is Malaysias largest secular and Socialist opposition party. ... Barisan Alternatif (BA, Alternative Front in Malay) is a coalition of Malaysian opposition parties, formed as a counterweight to the ruling Barisan Nasional. ... PAS logo The Islamic Party of Malaysia (also PAS, from Malay Parti Islam SeMalaysia) is an Islamist political party in Malaysia and is currently headed by Datuk Seri Abdul Hadi Awang. ... The Peoples Justice Party (Parti Keadilan Rakyat in Malay, often known simply as Keadilan) is a Malaysian opposition party. ... The Star is the leading English-language newspaper in Malaysia. ...

See also

Politics of Malaysia takes place in a framework of a federal parliamentary monarchy, whereby the Prime Minister of Malaysia is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... The Parliament building The Malaysian Houses of Parliament is where the Malaysian legislative arm assemble. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ "Parliament House". Retrieved Feb. 12, 2006.
  2. ^ Funston, John (2001). "Malaysia: Developmental State Challenged". In John Funston (Ed.), Government and Politics in Southeast Asia, pp. 180, 183. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.
  3. ^ "MALAYSIA: Why Parliament sessions can't go live on TV". (May 6, 2004). Straits Times.
  4. ^ a b "Branches of Government in Malaysia". Retrieved Feb. 3, 2006.
  5. ^ Means, Gordon P. (1991). Malaysian Politics: The Second Generation, pp. 14, 15. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-588988-6.
  6. ^ Myytenaere, Robert (1998). "The Immunities of Members of Parliament". Retrieved Feb. 12, 2006.
  7. ^ a b "Malaysia". Retrieved Jan. 22, 2006.
  8. ^ a b Lim, Kit Siang (2004). "Master English campaign - one day a week in Parliament for free use of English". Retrieved Feb. 15, 2006.
  9. ^ Shuid, Mahdi & Yunus, Mohd. Fauzi (2001). Malaysian Studies, pp. 33, 34. Longman. ISBN 983-74-2024-3.
  10. ^ Shuid & Yunus, p. 34.
  11. ^ Tan, Chee Koon & Vasil, Raj (ed., 1984). Without Fear or Favour, p. 7. Eastern Universities Press. ISBN 967-908-051-X.
  12. ^ Tan & Vasil, p. 11.
  13. ^ Ram, B. Suresh (Dec. 16, 2005). "Pro-people, passionate politician". The Sun.
  14. ^ Lim, Kit Siang (1997). "Consensus Against Corruption". Retrieved Feb. 11, 2006.
  15. ^ Henderson, John William, Vreeland, Nena, Dana, Glenn B., Hurwitz, Geoffrey B., Just, Peter, Moeller, Philip W. & Shinn, R.S. (1977). Area Handbook for Malaysia, p. 219. American University, Washington D.C., Foreign Area Studies. LCCN 771294.
  16. ^ a b c d Ahmad, Zainon & Phang, Llew-Ann (Oct. 1, 2005). The all-powerful executive. The Sun.
  17. ^ Funston, p. 180.
  18. ^ Mohammad, Mahathir bin. The Malay Dilemma, p. 11.
  19. ^ "Conclusion". In John Funston (Ed.) Government and Politics in Southeast Asia, p. 415.
  20. ^ Lim, Kit Siang (2005). "The day Dr. Mahathir was 'taken for a ride' by Rafidah". Retrieved Oct. 15, 2005.
  21. ^ Ahmad, Abdul Razak (Feb. 5, 2006). "Live broadcast from the Dewan Rakyat?", pp. 18, 21. New Straits Times.
  22. ^ Funston, p. 183.
  23. ^ Lim, Kit Siang (2005). "'Save Parliament' campaign". Retrieved Oct. 12, 2005.
  24. ^ "Order in the House". (Oct. 12, 2005). New Straits Times, p. 18.
  25. ^ Lim, Kit Siang (2005). "Minister for 'First-World' Parliament - not Minister for Parliament toilets and canteen". Retrieved Oct. 12, 2005.
  26. ^ a b "Resounding aye to power separation". (Oct. 14, 2005). New Straits Times, p. 8.
  27. ^ Lim, Kit Siang (2005). "Skies brighten for Parliament after a week of dark clouds". Retrieved Oct. 14, 2005.
  28. ^ Lim, Kit Siang (2005). "Sorry I was wrong, there is still no light at the end of the tunnel". Retrieved Oct. 17, 2005.

The Straits Times is an English-language broadsheet newspaper based in Singapore. ... LCCN is an abbreviation for two different but related concepts: Library of Congress Cataloging Newsline, an irregularly published online newsletter about matters relating to Library of Congress Classification (which see). ... The New Straits Times is a Malaysian English language newspaper. ...

External links

  • Official Parliament website (in Malay)
  • Videos of Parliamentary Proceedings at Google Video (in Malay)
  • Videos of Parliamentary Proceedings at YouTube (in Malay)

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parliament: Definition and Much More From Answers.com (5714 words)
The parliament, which is also referred to as the Estates of Scotland, the Three Estates, the Scots Parliament or the auld Scots Parliament (Eng: old), met until the Acts of Union merged the parliament of Scotland and the Parliament of England, creating the new Parliament of Great Britain in 1707.
The Parliament of the United Kingdom was originally formed in 1707 by the Acts of Union that replaced the former parliaments of England and Scotland - the Irish Parliament was subsumed into the Imperial Parliament in 1801.
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The West Malaysia wing of the 13-state federation of Malaysia occupies the southern half of the Malay Peninsula and is separated from East Malaysia by the South China Sea.
The East Malaysia wing of the 13-state federation of Malaysia consists of the states of Sabah and Sarawak on the northern and northwestern part of the island of Borneo and is separated from mainland Peninsular, or West, Malaysia on the Malay Peninsula by some 400 mi (640 km) of the South China Sea.
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