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Encyclopedia > Parliament Square
Anti-war protesters gather at Parliament Square on the afternoon of March 20, 2003, as seen from the roof of the Palace of Westminster.
Anti-war protesters gather at Parliament Square on the afternoon of March 20, 2003, as seen from the roof of the Palace of Westminster.

Parliament Square is a square outside the north-western end of the Palace of Westminster in London. It features a large open green area in the middle, with a group of trees to its west. Parliament Square may refer to: Parliament Square, Berne, Switzerland Parliament Square, Dublin, Ireland; part of Trinity College, Dublin Parliament Square, Edinburgh, Scotland Parliament Square, London, England Parliament Square, Melbourne, Australia Parliament Square, Nassau, The Bahamas Parliament Square, Toronto, Canada Parliament House Category: ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1152x852, 309 KB) Image:Parlsquareprotests. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1152x852, 309 KB) Image:Parlsquareprotests. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... A town square is an open area commonly found in the heart of a traditional town used for community gatherings. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

Contents

Location

Other buildings looking upon the Square include Westminster Abbey and St. Margaret's, Westminster, the Middlesex Guildhall (to become the seat of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom), 100 Parliament Street serving HM Treasury and HM Revenue and Customs, and Portcullis House (and so Westminster tube station). The Middlesex Guildhall The Middlesex Guildhall is a building on the south-west corner of Parliament Square in London. ... The Supreme Court of the United Kingdom will be created under the provisions of the Constitutional Reform Act 2005 to take over the judicial functions of the Law Lords in the House of Lords and from the Judicial committee of the Privy Council. ... The new eastern entrance to HM Treasury HM Treasury, in full Her Majestys Treasury, informally The Treasury, is the United Kingdom government department responsible for developing and executing the UK Governments financial and economic policy. ... Her Majestys Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is a new department of the British Government created by the merger of the Inland Revenue and Her Majestys Customs and Excise which came into formal effect on 18 April 2005. ... Portcullis House is a building in Westminster, London, used as offices for members of Parliament. ... For other items relating to Westminster, see Westminster (disambiguation) Westminster tube station on the London Underground serves the Circle, District and Jubilee lines. ...


Roads coming off the Square are St. Margaret Street (becoming Abingdon Street and then Millbank), Broad Sanctuary (becoming Victoria Street), Lite George Street, Great George Street (which becomes Birdcage Walk), Parliament Street (becoming Whitehall), and Bridge Street (becoming Westminster Bridge). Millbank is an area of London, England, that is east of Pimlico and south of Westminster. ... Victoria Street is the name of several streets in various countries: In Australia: Victoria Street, Sydney, New South Wales Victoria Street, Melbourne, Victoria In Singapore: Victoria Street In the United Kingdom: Victoria Street, London, England In the United States: Victoria Street, Carson, California See also: List of places named after... Birdcage Walk is a street in London, United Kingdom, in the City of Westminster. ... Parliament Street is the name of several places including The southern extension of Whitehall in London, leading to Parliament Square and the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Whitehall, London, looking south towards the Houses of Parliament. ... Westminster Bridge and the Palace of Westminster, with a glimpse of Westminster Abbey behind the tower of Big Ben. ...


Statues in and around the Square are mostly of well-known statesmen, and include ones of Winston Churchill (on the north-eastern edge of the green and turned east, overlooking Parliament), Abraham Lincoln (in front of Middlesex Guildhall), Robert Peel (south-western edge of the green), Lord Palmerston (north-western edge of the green), Jan Christian Smuts (northern edge of the green), Derby, Disraeli and George Canning. On August 29, 2007, a nine-foot high bronze statue of Nelson Mandela was erected in the square, Westminster City Council having objected to its erection in Trafalgar Square, due to space considerations. It was unveiled by the British Prime Minister, Gordon Brown, in the presence of Wendy Woods, the widow of Donald Woods, the late anti-apartheid campaigner, and the former British actor and long-time friend of Woods, Lord Attenborough. Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (Can) (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Right Honourable Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (October 20, 1784 - October 18, 1865) was a British statesman who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid 19th century. ... Jan Smuts Field Marshal Jan Christiaan Smuts, OM, CH, ED, KC, FRS (May 24, 1870 – September 11, 1950) was a prominent South African and Commonwealth statesman, military leader, and philosopher. ... Arms of Edward Smith-Stanley Statue in Parliament Square, London Edward George Geoffrey Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, KG, PC (29 March 1799–23 October 1869) was a British statesman, three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and is to date the longest serving leader of the Conservative... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, KG, PC, FRS (December 21, 1804 – April 19, 1881), born Benjamin DIsraeli was a British Conservative statesman and literary figure. ... George Canning (11 April 1770-8 August 1827) was a British statesman and politician who served as Foreign Secretary and, briefly, Prime Minister. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela (IPA: ) (born 18 July 1918) is the former President of South Africa, and the first to be elected in fully representative democratic elections. ... Trafalgar Square viewed from the northeast corner. ... For others with the same or similar names, see Gordon Brown (disambiguation). ... Donald James Woods, CBE (December 15, 1933 – August 19, 2001) was a South African journalist and anti-apartheid activist. ... Richard Samuel Attenborough, Baron Attenborough (born August 29, 1923 in Cambridge, England) is an actor and director. ...


History

A statue of Sir Winston Churchill in Parliament Square.
A statue of Sir Winston Churchill in Parliament Square.

Parliament Square was laid out in 1868 in order to open up the space around the Palace of Westminster and improve traffic flow, and featured London's first traffic signals. A substantial amount of property had to be cleared from the site. The architect responsible was Sir Charles Barry. Its original features included the Buxton Memorial Fountain, which was removed in 1940 and placed in its present position in nearby Victoria Tower Gardens in 1957. In 1950 the square was redesigned by George Grey Wornum. The central garden of the Square was transferred from the Parliamentary estate to the control of the Greater London Authority by the Greater London Authority Act 1999. It has responsibility to light, cleanse, water, pave, and repair the garden, and has powers to make bylaws for the garden. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (690x1026, 148 KB) Statue of Winston Churchill in Parliament Square, opposite the Palace of Westminster in central London. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (690x1026, 148 KB) Statue of Winston Churchill in Parliament Square, opposite the Palace of Westminster in central London. ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (Can) (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster, Barrys most famous building. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Victoria Tower Gardens is a public park along the north bank of the River Thames in London. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... George Grey WORNUM. British Architect. ... The Greater London Authority (GLA) administers the 1579 km² (610 sq. ... The Greater London Authority Act 1999 (1999 c. ... A bylaw (sometimes also seen as by-law or Byelaw) was originally the Viking town law in the Danelaw. ...


The east side of the Square, lying opposite one of the key entrances to the Palace of Westminster, has historically been a common site of protest against government action or inaction. On May Day 2000 the square was transformed into a giant allotment by a Reclaim the Streets guerrilla gardening action. Most recently, Brian Haw staged a continual protest there for several years, campaigning against British and American action in Iraq. Starting on 2 June 2001, Haw only left his post once, on 10 May 2004 - and then because he had been arrested on the charge of failing to leave the area during a security alert, and returned the following day when he was released. The disruption that Haw's protest is alleged to have caused led Parliament to insert a clause into the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005 making it illegal to have protests in Parliament Square (or, indeed, in a large area reaching roughly a kilometre in all directions) without first seeking the permission of the Metropolitan Police Commissioner. May Day is May 1, and refers to any of several holidays celebrated on this day. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... A typical allotment plot, Essex, England Allotment gardens are characterized by a concentration in one place of a few or up to several hundreds of land parcels that are assigned to individual families. ... Reclaim the Streets (RTS) is a collective with a shared ideal of community ownership of public spaces. ... Guerrilla gardeners planting vegetables in downtown Calgary. ... Brian Haw. ... The subject of this article is the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005 (SOCPA) (2005 c. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... The Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis (usually just referred to as the Metropolitan Police Commissioner or, more colloquially, as the Met Commissioner) is the head of the Metropolitan Police Service in London. ...


As well as sparking a great deal of protest from various groups on the grounds of infringement of civil liberties including the European Convention on Human Rights, the Act was initially unsuccessful in accomplishing its goals: Brian Haw was held to be exempt from needing authorisation in a High Court ruling, as his protest had started before the Act came into effect (though any new protests would be covered); Haw remained in Parliament Square. Later, the Court of Appeal overturned this ruling, forcing Haw to apply for police authorisation to continue his protest. Civil liberties is the name given to freedoms that protect the individual from government. ... “ECHR” redirects here. ...


To commemorate New Zealand's national day (Waitangi Day), as Big Ben strokes 4 p.m. on the Saturday closest to the 6th February, the annual expat-kiwi Circle Line pub crawl culminates in an epic 5,000+ strong mass haka (Maori war dance) in Parliament Square. Waitangi Day is a public holiday in New Zealand held each year on February 6 to celebrate the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi, New Zealands founding document, on that date in 1840. ... The Clock Tower, often mistakenly known as Big Ben (the nickname of the Great Bell housed within the Clock Tower) The Clock Tower is the worlds largest four-faced, chiming turret clock. ... The haka is a traditional genre of Māori dance. ...


Links to pictures of statues

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1536x2048, 392 KB) George Canning statue in Parliament Square, London; 13 June 2006 I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 451 KB) Summary Earl_of_Derby_statue, Parliament Square, London, Tuesday 13 June 2006 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 322 KB) Summary Benjamin Disraeli statue, Parliament Square, London, Tuesday 13 June 2006 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (848x1749, 143 KB) Viscount Palmerston statue in Parliament Square, London; 13 June 2006--Runcorn 22:12, 13 June 2006 (UTC) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 385 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Robert Peel ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1536x2048, 298 KB) Jan Smuts statue in Parliament Square, London; 13 June 2006 NB: The sculptor was Jacob Epstein --Runcorn 19:37, 14 June 2006 (UTC) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or...

References

The Buildings of England, London 6: Westminster, (2003) Simon Bradley and Nickolaus Pevsner. ISBN 0-300-09595-3 Sir Nikolaus Pevsner CBE (January 30, 1902 – August 18, 1983) was a German-born British historian of art and, especially, architecture. ...


External links

  • Brian Haw's website
  • 360 Panorama from Parliament Square

Coordinates: 51°30′02″N, 0°07′36″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Parliament Square - definition of Parliament Square in Encyclopedia (242 words)
Parliament Square is a roundabout west of the northern end of the British Houses of Parliament.
The east side of the square is a common location for protests, due to its proximity to the Palace of Westminster.
The central garden of the square was transferred to control of the Greater London Authority by the Greater London Authority Act 1999.
Mayor of London - Booking Parliament Square (460 words)
Parliament Square may be used for filming, photo-shoots and photo-calls, subject to approval in advance.
Applications cannot be taken for Parliament Square more than six (6) months in advance and organisers should not have any more than two applications pending in the same period.
Activities that could impact on the general maintenance of the Square may require a specific assessment prior to approval being granted and there may be a cost for this assessment that will need to be met by the organiser and may increase the time required to process the application.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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