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Encyclopedia > Park Slope, Brooklyn
A typical Park Slope block in spring.

Park Slope is a neighborhood in the western section of Brooklyn, New York City's most populous borough. Park Slope is roughly bounded by Prospect Park West to 4th Avenue, Park Place to the Greenwood Cemetery according to the New York City Department of City Planning[1], though other definitions are sometimes offered.[2][3] It takes its name from its location on the western slope of neighboring Prospect Park. Seventh Avenue and Fifth Avenue are its primary commercial streets, while its east-west side streets are populated by many historic brownstones. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 634 KB) Photo by Greogry Kats (myself) Fabulosly-looking Park Slope street in a Spring. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 634 KB) Photo by Greogry Kats (myself) Fabulosly-looking Park Slope street in a Spring. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Five Boroughs redirects here. ... Prospect Park is a 585[1] acre (2. ... This article is about the building material and the dwelling. ...


Park Slope is characterized by its historic buildings, top-rated restaurants, bars, and shops, as well as close access to Prospect Park, the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, the Brooklyn Museum, the Brooklyn Conservatory of Music, and the Central Library (as well as the Park Slope branch) of the Brooklyn Public Library system. [4] Prospect Park is a 585[1] acre (2. ... Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) is a major performing arts venue in Brooklyn, a borough of New York City, known as a center for progressive and avant garde performance. ... The Cranford Rose Garden in Brooklyn Botanic Garden, New York City The Brooklyn Botanic Garden (BCG) is a botanical garden located next to Prospect Park near Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn, New York, USA. Founded in 1910, the 52 acre (210,000 m²) garden includes a cherry tree esplanade, a... The Brooklyn Museum, located at 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York, is the second largest art museum in New York City, and one of the largest in the United States. ... The Main Branch, Brooklyn Public Library, Grand Army Plaza, 2003 The Brooklyn Public Library (BPL), is the public library system of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ...


The neighborhood had a population of more than 62,000 as of the 2000 census,[5] resulting in a population density of approximately 68,000/square mile (or approximately 26,000/square kilometer) in the area bounded by Fourth Avenue, Prospect Park West, Flatbush Avenue, and Sixteenth Street.


In December 2006 Natural Home magazine named Park Slope one of America's 10 best neighborhoods based on criteria including parks, green spaces and neighborhood gathering spaces; farmer’s markets and community gardens; public transportation and locally-owned businesses; and environmental and social policy.[6] Park Slope is part of Brooklyn Community Board 6. The Brooklyn Community Board 6 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Red Hook, Carroll Gardens, Park Slope, Gowanus, and [[Cobble Hill, in the borough of Brooklyn. ...

Contents

History

Early history

The area that today comprises the neighborhood of Park Slope was first inhabited by the Canarsee Native Americans. The Dutch colonized the area by the 1600s and farmed the region for more than 200 years. During the American Revolutionary War on August 27, 1776, the Park Slope area served as the backdrop for the beginning of the Battle of Long Island, also called the Battle of Brooklyn, the first pitched battle between the British and the Continental Army under the command of George Washington. In this battle, over 10,000 British Redcoats and Hessians routed outnumbered American forces at Battle Pass. What appeared as a major defeat for the colonials was actually the first of many of Washington's tactical retreats. The historic site of Battle Pass is now preserved in Prospect Park, and on Fifth Avenue there is a reconstruction of a stone farmhouse where a countercharge covered the American retreat. This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... This article is about military actions only. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States Kingdom of Great Britain Commanders George Washington, Israel Putnam William Howe, Charles Cornwallis, Henry Clinton Strength 11,000-13,000 (about 10,000 of which were militia ) 22,000 (including 9,000 Hessians) Casualties 1,719 total (312 dead, 1,407 wounded, captured or missing) 377 total... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The term Hessian refers to the inhabitants of the German state of Hesse. ...


19th-century development

The architectural details of one of Park Slope's buildings.
The architectural details of one of Park Slope's buildings.

In 1814, ferry service from the nearby Brooklyn Terminal linked the Park Slope and South Brooklyn region to Manhattan, a thriving business center at the time. By the 1850s, a local lawyer and railroad developer named Edwin Clarke Litchfield (1815-1885) purchased large tracts of what was then farmland. Through the American Civil War era, he sold off much of his land to residential developers. During the 1860s, the City of Brooklyn purchased his estate and adjoining property to create the famous 526 acre (2 km²) Prospect Park, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 249 KB) Summary The architectural details of one of houses in Park Slope Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 249 KB) Summary The architectural details of one of houses in Park Slope Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation... South Brooklyn is a hybrid neighborhood encompassing areas of Carroll Gardens, Cobble Hill, Red Hook, Gowanus and Boerum Hill. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... A real estate developer (American English) or property developer (British English) makes improvements of some kind to real property, thereby increasing its value. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Prospect Park is a 585[1] acre (2. ... {{Infobox Person | name = | image = FLOlmstead. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Park Slope’s bucolic period ended soon after. By the late 1870s, with horse-drawn rail cars running to the park and the ferry, bringing many rich New Yorkers in the process, urban sprawl dramatically changed the neighborhood into a streetcar suburb. Many of the large Victorian mansions on Prospect Park West, known as the Gold Coast, were built in the 1880s and 1890s to take advantage of the beautiful park views. Today, many of these buildings are preserved within the 24-block Park Slope Historic District, one of New York's largest landmarked neighborhoods. By 1883, with the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge, Park Slope continued to boom and subsequent brick and brownstone structures pushed the neighborhood's borders farther. The 1890 census showed Park Slope to be the richest community in the United States. Bucolic, although often used as an adjective, is a noun originally describing a type of pastoral poetry that praises rural life over that of the city. ... Urban sprawl (also: suburban sprawl) is the spreading out of a city and its suburbs over rural land at the fringe of an urban area. ... A streetcar suburb is a community whose growth and development was strongly shaped by the use of streetcar lines as a primary means of transportation. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... For other uses, see Brooklyn Bridge (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Brick (disambiguation). ... This article is about the building material and the dwelling. ...


In 1892, President Grover Cleveland presided over the unveiling of The Soldiers and Sailors Arch at Grand Army Plaza, a notable Park Slope landmark. Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908), the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, was the only President to serve non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... The Soldiers and Sailors Arch at Grand Army Plaza Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn, New York forms the main entrance to Prospect Park. ...


The Old Stone House is a 1930 reconstruction of the Vechte-Cortelyou House which was destroyed in 1897. It is located on Third Street between Fourth and Fifth Avenues, beside the former Gowanus Creek. The Old Stone House is a 1930 reconstruction of the Vechte-Cortelyou House which was destroyed in 1897. ...


Baseball history

Baseball has played a prominent role in the history of the Park Slope area. From 1879-1889, the Brooklyn Atlantics (later to become the Dodgers) played at Washington Park on 5th Avenue between 3rd and 4th Streets. When the park was destroyed by a fire, the team moved to their part-time home in Ridgewood, Queens and then to a park in East New York. In 1898, the "New" Washington Park was built between Third and Fourth Avenues and between First and Third Streets near the Gowanus Canal. The team, by this point known as the Dodgers, played to an ever-growing fan base at this location. By the end of the 1912 season, it was clear that the team had outgrown the field, and the neighborhood. Team owner Charles Ebbets moved the team to his Ebbets Field stadium in Flatbush for the beginning of the 1913 season. [7] The team went on to have historic crosstown rivalries with both the New York Giants and New York Yankees. This article is about the sport. ... The Atlantic Base Ball Club of Brooklyn (Atlantic or the Brooklyn Atlantics) was baseballs first champion and its first dynasty. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899... Washington Park was the name given to two different major league baseball parks in the Park Slope neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, located at 3rd St. ... The Myrtle Avenue Business Improvement District runs from Wyckoff Avenue to Fresh Pond Road in Ridgewood. ... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ... East New York is a primarily low to middle income neighborhood in the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... An aerial view of the canal and its crossings. ... Charles Hercules Ebbets (October 29, 1859 - April 18, 1925) was an American sports executive who was owner of the Brooklyn Dodgers from 1903 to 1925. ... Ebbets Field was a Major League Baseball park located in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, New York. ... Flatbush is a community of the Borough of Brooklyn, a part of New York City, consisting of several neighborhoods. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as...


Crash of United Flight 826

On December 16, 1960, two airliners collided above Staten Island, killing 135 people in what was the worst U.S. aviation disaster to that time. One of the airplanes, a Douglas DC-8 operating as United Airlines Flight 826, was able to stay airborne for a few miles before crashing near the corner of Sterling Place and Seventh Avenue[8], destroying several buildings. Almost everyone on board was instantly killed, but one 11-year-old boy survived the night before succumbing to his injuries. December 17 front page of Syracuse Post-Standard The 1960 New York air disaster was a collision in December 16, 1960 between two airlines over Staten Island, New York in which one plane crashed into Staten Island and the other airline crashed into a Brooklyn neighborhood. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the borough in New York City. ... The Douglas DC-8 is a four-engined jet airliner, manufactured between 1959 and 1972. ... United Airlines Flight 826 crashed in Brooklyn, New York on December 16, 1960 after colliding in mid-air over a foggy Staten Island with a TWA Constellation that was approaching La Guardia Airport. ...


Blight and renewal

A close-up of houses.

Through the 1950s, Park Slope saw its decline as a result of suburban sprawl and bearish local industries. Many of the wealthy and middle-class families fled for the suburban life and Park Slope became a rougher, working class neighborhood. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 327 KB) Photo by Greogry Kats (myself) Especially in a spring, Victorian Houses of Park Slope Streets look so fabulous File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 327 KB) Photo by Greogry Kats (myself) Especially in a spring, Victorian Houses of Park Slope Streets look so fabulous File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Urban sprawl (also called suburban sprawl and Los Angelization) describes the growth of a metropolitan area, particularly the suburbs, over a large area. ... Wealth usually refers to money and property. ... This article is about the socio-economic class from a global vantage point. ... White flight is a term for the demographic trend where working- and middle-class white people move away from increasingly racial-minority inner-city neighborhoods to white suburbs and exurbs. ... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ...


The precursor to renovated brownstones and boutique bohemianism was an urban renewal process started by working families and a community of feminists, many of them lesbians. [9] By the 1960s, an official revitalization movement was in full swing to preserve the neighborhood's historic row houses, stately brownstones, and Queen Anne, Renaissance Revival, and Romanesque mansions. With the historic Park Slope district (around Seventh Avenue) seeing a rebirth, the rest of the area saw a similar increase in popularity. Feminists redirects here. ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... The Buttermans, the historic home of John Newman, the butter king, is one of several Queen Anne mansions in Elgin, Illinois The Queen Anne style of British and American architecture reached its greatest popularity in the last quarter of the 19th century, manifesting itself in a number of different ways... Tempietto di San Pietro in Montorio, Rome, 1502, by Bramante. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ...


In the late 1970s, the area around Fifth Avenue in Park Slope was suffering from widespread abandonment and blight, with more than 200 vacant buildings and 150 vacant lots within one mile. As a result of the neighborhood's close proximity to Prospect Park, and the many well-built apartment houses and brownstones, this region also became ripe for renewal.


By the 1990s, partly as a result of inflated Manhattan rents along with the inflated dot-com economy, people who might otherwise have lived in Manhattan began moving to Park Slope in large numbers. The influx was mainly families and young professionals: hipsters tended to move to Williamsburg, while yuppies tended to move to Park Slope and Greenpoint. For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... The New Economy is a term that was coined in late 1990s to describe the evolution of the United States and other rich countries from an industrial/manufacturing-based economy into a high technology-based economy, arising largely from new developments in the technology sector. ... The word hipster is usually applied to middle class and upper class young people of North America and Europe and also in few cities of Latin America and Asia. ... Williamsburg is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, bordering Greenpoint, Bed-Stuy, and Bushwick. ... Yuppies (young urban professionals, young up and coming professionals or less commonly young upwardly-mobile professionals[1]) is a market segment whose consumers are characterized as self-reliant, financially secure individualists. ...


During the second major boom for the neighborhood, Park Slope evolved into a racially and economically mixed neighborhood, a place where stock brokers live alongside poor and middle-class working families. But, this phenomenon is far from natural and is the result of much planning and activism by local community organizations, like the Fifth Avenue Committee, that fought to maintain much of the neighborhood's diversity. A 2001 report by the New York City Rent Guidelines Board found that from 1990 to 1999, rents in New York City increased by 3.5-4.4% per year, depending on what kind of building the apartment was in. [10] The explosion of property values inspired real estate agents to be increasingly generous about the borders of Park Slope, not unlike the expansion of Fort Greene into Bedford-Stuyvesant; South Slope, Prospect Heights, Windsor Terrace, Gowanus, Greenwood Heights, and Boerum Hill all became to some extent part of greater Park Slope. A Stock broker sells or buys stock on behalf of a customer. ... Working poor is a term used to describe individuals and families who maintain regular employment but remain in relative poverty due to low levels of pay and dependent expenses. ... Urban planning is concerned with the ordering and design of settlements, from the smallest towns to the worlds largest cities. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... Community organizations are nonprofits that operate within a single local community. ... The term multiculturalism generally refers to a state of both cultural and ethnic diversity within the demographics of a particular social space. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with rental agreement. ... Fort Greene is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... Bedford-Stuyvesant (also known as Bed-Stuy) is a neighborhood in the central portion of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... Prospect Heights is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, bounded by Flatbush Avenue to the west, Atlantic Avenue to the north, Eastern Parkway to the south, and, traditionally, Washington Avenue to the east,[1] though some people believe the eastern boundary is Bedford Avenue. ... A circle of greenery in Windsor Terrace Windsor Terrace is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... Gowanus is a neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York, USA, situated roughly between Red Hook and Carroll Gardens on the west and Park Slope on the East. ... Boerum Hill is a small segment of Brooklyn roughly bounded by State Street to the north, 3rd Avenue to the east, Court Street to the west, and Warren Street to the south. ...


The negative impact, however, of this renewal is the displacement of the immigrant population that settled here in the 1980s. As the more affluent began to move into Park Slope, the rising rents made it difficult for low-income residents to stay. Thanks to rent stabilization and the "cachet" of specific addresses, it is not uncommon to find those same early immigrants who moved into the neighborhood living adjacent to renters paying two to three times higher rent.


The commercial impacts of the renewal can also be seen along the popular Fifth Avenue stretch, where numerous banks and bars have replaced old neighborhood staples such as the Salvation Army and once popular dollar stores. Similarly, on Seventh Avenue, many small family-owned bookstores and coffee shops saw a reduction in clientèle when Barnes & Noble and Starbucks appeared in the neighborhood. While renewal and the ensuing rush of brand name stores normally signal a driving down of prices, in some industries such as food services, prices have gone up. Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a non-military evangelical Christian organisation. ... A 99 cent store A dollar store is a store that sells inexpensive items for one dollar or less each. ... A bookstore. ... Discussing the War in a Paris Café, Illustrated London News 17 September 1870 Coffee shop redirects here. ... A typical Barnes & Noble bookstore. ... For other meanings of the name Starbuck, see Starbuck. ...


Transportation

The neighborhood is well served by the New York City Subway. Several lines have stops in Park Slope, including the F train at Fourth Avenue, Seventh Avenue and 15th Street–Prospect Park/Prospect Park West; The 2 and 3 trains at Atlantic Avenue, Bergen Street and Grand Army Plaza; the 4 and 5 (during rush hours only) trains also at Atlantic Avenue; the N, M, and R trains at Prospect Avenue, Ninth Street, Union Street and Atlantic Avenue–Pacific Street; the D train also at Atlantic Avenue-Pacific Street; and the B and Q trains at Atlantic Avenue and Seventh Avenue at Flatbush. Times Square–42nd Street station entrance The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority , an affiliate of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and also known as MTA New York City Transit. ... 179th Street to Coney Island The F Sixth Avenue Local is a rapid transit service of the New York City Subway. ... Fourth Avenue–Ninth Street is a New York City Subway station complex shared by the IND Culver Line and the BMT Fourth Avenue Line. ... Seventh Avenue, occasionally referred to as Seventh Avenue–Park Slope, is a station on the IND Culver Line of the New York City Subway. ... 15th Street-Prospect Park is a local station on the IND Culver Line, The mezzanine is full length and has a minimum of two former booths, one for the two exits to Prospect Park West and another near the 16th Street staircase. ... The 2 Seventh Avenue Express is a service of the New York City Subway. ... The 3 Seventh Avenue Express is a service of the New York City Subway. ... Atlantic Avenue, located at Flatbush Avenue and Atlantic Avenue, is a complex three-platform station, with an island platform between the express tracks, and two side platforms for the local tracks. ... Bergen Street is a station on the IRT Eastern Parkway Line of the New York City Subway, located at Bergen Street and Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn. ... Grand Army Plaza is a station on the IRT Eastern Parkway Line of the New York City Subway, located underneath Flatbush Avenue at Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn. ... The 4 Lexington Avenue Express is a service of the New York City Subway. ... The 5 Lexington Avenue Express is a service of the New York City Subway. ... The N Broadway Express is a service of the New York City Subway. ... The M Nassau Street Local is a service of the New York City Subway. ... Current and former R services The R Broadway Local is a service of the New York City Subway. ... 9th Street is a local station on the BMT Fourth Avenue Line. ... The Union Street station on the BMT Fourth Avenue Line is located at the corner of Fourth Avenue and Union Street in Brooklyn, NY. The station serves the R Train (all times), the M Train (rush hours only), the N Train and D Train (late night, 11pm-5:30am only). ... Atlantic Avenue–Pacific Street is a New York City Subway station complex shared by the IRT Eastern Parkway Line, the BMT Brighton Line and the BMT Fourth Avenue Line. ... The D Sixth Avenue Express is a service of the New York City Subway. ... The B Sixth Avenue Express is a service of the New York City Subway. ... The Q Broadway Express is a service of the New York City Subway. ... Seventh Avenue is a station on the BMT Brighton Line of the New York City Subway. ...


Community institutions

  • Park Slope Food Co-op on Union Street has approximately 12,000 members from Park Slope and other neighborhoods. Only members may shop there and membership requires a work commitment of 2 3/4 hours every four weeks.

Houses of worship

Park Slope has many beautiful and historic churches of many denominations, especially Catholic, as well as newer ones, as well as many synagogues to serve the large Jewish population. Park Slope's Muslims are served by mosques outside the neighborhood, though there are several nearby on Atlantic Avenue in Boerum Hill and in the Greenwood Terrace area just south of Park Slope. Atlantic Avenue is a street in the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens in New York City. ... Boerum Hill is a small segment of Brooklyn roughly bounded by State Street to the north, 3rd Avenue to the east, Court Street to the west, and Warren Street to the south. ...


Schools

Park Slope is home to a number of public and private educational institutions.

  • Poly Prep Lower School
  • Beth Elohim Day School (private preK-K) on Eighth Avenue and Garfield Place.
  • Berkeley Carroll School (private preK-12) on Lincoln Place, between Seventh and Eighth Avenues; Carroll Street, between Sixth and Seventh Avenues; and President Street, between Sixth and Seventh Avenues.
  • Brooklyn Free School (private ages 5-15) on Sixteenth Street, between Fourth and Fifth Avenues. See Free Schools.
  • Montessori School of New York (private ages 2-13) on Eighth Avenue between Carroll and President Streets. See Montessori.
  • MS 51 (public 6-8) on Fifth Avenue, between Fourth and Fifth Streets.
  • Poly Prep Lower School (private PreK-4) on Prospect Park West between First and Second Streets.
  • PS 39 (public preK-5) on Sixth Avenue, between Seventh and Eighth Streets. Also see [2].
  • PS 107 (public preK-5) on Eighth Avenue, between Thirteenth and Fourteenth Streets. Also see [3].
  • PS 124 (public preK-5) on Fourth Avenue, between Thirteenth and Fourteenth Streets.
  • PS 282 (public preK-5) on Sixth Avenue, between Berkeley Place and Lincoln Place.
  • PS 321 (public preK-5) on Seventh Avenue, between First and Second Streets. Also see [4].
  • Secondary School for Law, Journalism and Research (public 6-12) (Formerly John Jay HS), 237 Seventh Avenue between Fourth and Fifth Streets.
  • St. Francis Xavier (Catholic School) (K-8). 763 President St. between 6th & 7th Ave.
  • St. Saviour (Catholic School) (K-8) (9-12) 8th Avenue and 5th Street

The Berkeley Carroll School is an independent, nonsectarian, coed day school, enrolling about 750 students from pre-kindergarten through high school. ... Free Schools (or Free Skools) are decentralized networks that share skills, information, and knowledge without hierarchy and the institutional environment of formal schooling. ... The Montessori method is a methodology for nursery and elementary school education, first developed by Dr. Maria Montessori. ... Our Mission The mission of the Secondary School for Law, Journalism and Research is to provide a comprehensive, college preparatory educational experience for students in District 15. ...

Notable residents

Many notable people have lived in Park Slope, and many more still continue to call it home. John Linnell of They Might Be Giants has lived in Park Slope since the late 1990s. Former resident KRS-One was born Lawrence Krisna Parker in Park Slope before running away from home to the Bronx. Author Pete Hamill was born and raised here. Novelist Jhumpa Lahiri was a resident until 2005. Charles Schumer, New York's senior US Senator, lives near Grand Army Plaza overlooking Prospect Park. Deceased MC Ol' Dirty Bastard's mother lives in a four-story brownstone in Park Slope. Underground MC Pumpkinhead also hails from Park Slope, and bases multiple songs of his off it, as well as the names of two mixtapes. A promotional photograph from the late 1990s. ... This article is about the musical group. ... KRS-One (born Lawrence Krisna Parker on August 20, 1965 in Brooklyn, New York. ... For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ... Pete Hamill Pete Hamill (born June 24, 1935) is a prominent American journalist, novelist, and short story writer. ... Jhumpa Lahiri Vourvoulias (born Nilanjana Sudeshna in 1967) (Bengali: ঝুম্পা লাহিড়ী Jhumpa Lahiŗi) is a contemporary Indian American author based in New York City. ... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is a Jewish American politician. ... The Soldiers and Sailors Arch at Grand Army Plaza Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn, New York forms the main entrance to Prospect Park. ... Ol Dirty Bastard (November 15, 1968 - November 13, 2004) was an American rapper and one of the founding members of the hip hop group Wu-Tang Clan. ... For the album by Los Abandoned, see Mix Tape (album). ...


Many famous writers live in Park Slope including Jim Knipfel, Jonathan Safran Foer, Paul Auster, Franco Ambriz, Peter Blauner, Siri Hustvedt, John Wray, and Kathryn Harrison. Jim Knipfel (born 1965), a native of Wisconsin, is the author of a series of memoirs, Slackjaw, Quitting the Nairobi Trio, and Ruining It for Everybody, and a novel, The Buzzing. ... Jonathan Safran Foer This American author is not to be confused with the Australian media personality John Safran. ... Paul Auster Paul Benjamin Auster (born February 3, 1947, Newark, New Jersey) is a Brooklyn-based author. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Peter Blauner (1959- ) is the author of six novels, including Slow Motion Riot, which won the 1992 Edgar Award for Best First Novel from the Mystery Writers of America and was named an International Book of the Year by The Times Literary Supplement. ... Siri Hustvedt is a writer, born February 19th 1955 in Northfield, Minnesota, United States. ... John Wray may refer to: John Ray, the English naturalist, who for the first part of his life wrote his name as John Wray John Wray, the actor who appeared in films such as All Quiet on the Western Front This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists... Kathryn Harrison was born in 1961 in Los Angeles, and was raised by her grandparents. ...


Jazz musicians Danny Kalb, Joshua Redman and Michael Weiss, and Sara Moulton of the Food Network live in Park Slope. Danny Kalb is a blues guitarist and former founder of the 1960s group, Blues Project. ... Joshua Redman (born February 1, 1969) is a prominent American Neo-bop jazz saxophonist who records for Nonesuch Records. ... Pianist, composer Michael Weiss, best known for his fifteen year association with saxophonist Johnny Griffin, has forged a solid reputation accompanying jazz luminaries such as Art Farmer, Charles McPherson, Slide Hampton, George Coleman, the Heath brothers, the Jazztet, Lou Donaldson, Pepper Adams, Bill Hardman, Junior Cook, Wynton Marsalis and the... Sara Moulton is the executive chef of Gourmet magazine and was host of the Food Network show Saras Secrets. ... Food Network is an American cable network that airs many specials and recurring (episodic) shows about food. ...


Actors

Jon Avery Abrahams (born 29 October 1977 in New York) is an American actor, most notably playing Bobby Prinze in the horror spoof Scary Movie. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Steven Vincent Buscemi (born December 13, 1957) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American actor and film director. ... Jennifer Lynn Connelly (born December 12, 1970) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former child model. ... David Cross (born April 4, 1964) is an Emmy-winning American comedian, writer and actor. ... Kathryn Erbe (born July 5, 1966) is an American actress best known for her role as Detective Alexandra Eames on Law & Order: Criminal Intent, a spin-off of Law & Order. ... Laurence John Fishburne III[1] (born July 30, 1961) is an American Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Tony Award-winning actor of screen and stage, as well as playwright, director, and producer. ... Zena Lotus Grey (born November 15, 1988) is an American actress. ... Maggie Ruth Gyllenhaal (born November 16, 1977) is an American actress. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Terry Kinney(b. ... Born: Athanasios Demetrios Maroulis on September 22 1964 in Brooklyn NY. Athan Maroulis acted in various college and summer stock theater productions prior to turning his attentions towards being a band vocalist. ... Kelly McGillis (born July 9, 1957 in Newport Beach, California, USA) is an American actress, whose notable movies include Witness (for which she received a Golden Globe nomination), Top Gun and The Accused. ... Colin Quinn Colin Quinn (born June 6, 1959) is a Irish-American comedian, best known for his five years in the cast of Saturday Night Live. ... Peter Sarsgaard (born March 7, 1971) is a Golden Globe Award-nominated American film and stage actor. ... John Michael Turturro (born February 28, 1957) is an Emmy Award-winning American actor noted for his performances in To Live and Die in L.A. (1985), The Color of Money (1986), Five Corners (1987), Men of Respect (1991), Quiz Show (1994), Monday Night Mayhem (1999), Secret Window (2004), The... John Ventimiglia (born July 17, 1968 in Ridgewood, Queens, New York City) is an American actor, most famous for his role as Artie Bucco on the HBO television series The Sopranos. ... Wentworth Earl Miller III (born June 2, 1972) is an English-born American Golden Globe nominated actor. ...

Rappers

KRS-One (born Lawrence Krisna Parker on August 20, 1965 in Brooklyn, New York. ...

Artists

Alex Grey (born November 29, 1953 in Columbus, Ohio) is an artist specializing in spiritual and psychedelic art (or visionary art) that is sometimes associated with the New Age movement. ... David Rees (born 1972) is a cartoonist whose best known series combine bland clip art with outraged trash talk to incongruous effect. ... Byron Kim (born in 1961 in La Jolla, California) is a contemporary artist who lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. ... Janine Antoni (b. ... Lisa Sigal (born 1962, Philadelphia) is a contemporary artist who lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. ...

Writers

Paul Auster Paul Benjamin Auster (born February 3, 1947, Newark, New Jersey) is a Brooklyn-based author. ... Siri Hustvedt is a writer, born February 19th 1955 in Northfield, Minnesota, United States. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Peter Blauner (1959- ) is the author of six novels, including Slow Motion Riot, which won the 1992 Edgar Award for Best First Novel from the Mystery Writers of America and was named an International Book of the Year by The Times Literary Supplement. ... Betty Crow and Helen Boyd in 2005 Helen Boyd is the author of two noteworthy books about her relationship with Betty Crow, her transgender husband. ... Arthur H. Bradford (born November 19, 1969, in Boothbay Harbor, Maine) is an American short story author. ... Bruce Brooks (born September 23, 1950) is an American author of young adult and childrens literature. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Rudolph Delson (born March 26, 1975) is an American author best known for his 2007 debut novel, Maynard and Jennica, published by Houghton Mifflin. ... Jonathan Safran Foer This American author is not to be confused with the Australian media personality John Safran. ... Ben Greenman (born 1969) is an American writer and magazine editor. ... Pete Hamill Pete Hamill (born June 24, 1935) is a prominent American journalist, novelist, and short story writer. ... Colin Harrison (born 1960 in New York City) is an American author and editor. ... Kathryn Harrison was born in 1961 in Los Angeles, and was raised by her grandparents. ... John Hodgman in 2006 John Kellogg Hodgman[1] (born June 1971) is an American author and humorist who is best known for his personification of a PC in Apples Get a Mac advertising campaign and his correspondent work on Comedy Central’s The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. ... Jim Knipfel (born 1965), a native of Wisconsin, is the author of a series of memoirs, Slackjaw, Quitting the Nairobi Trio, and Ruining It for Everybody, and a novel, The Buzzing. ... Nicole Krauss is an American writer who lives in the Park Slope neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, with her husband, novelist Jonathan Safran Foer, and their dog, George. ... Jhumpa Lahiri Vourvoulias (born Nilanjana Sudeshna in 1967) (Bengali: ঝুম্পা লাহিড়ী Jhumpa Lahiŗi) is a contemporary Indian American author based in New York City. ... Michael Patrick MacDonald (born in 1966) is an Irish-American activist against crime and violence and author of his memoir, All Souls: A Family Story From Southie. ... Jennie Fields is an American author born in Chicago, and raised in Highland Park, Illinois. ... Rick Moody (born Hiram Frederick Moody III October 18, 1961 in New York City), is an American novelist and short story writer best known for The Ice Storm (1994), a chronicle of the dissolution of two suburban Connecticut families over Thanksgiving weekend in 1973. ... Douglas Rushkoff (born 18 February 1961) is a New York-based writer, columnist and lecturer on technology, media and popular culture. ... Brian Selznick (born 14 July 1966 in East Brunswick, New Jersey) is an American author and illustrator of childrens books. ... Jon Scieszka (SHEH-ska) (born September 8, 1954 in Flint, Michigan, USA) is an American author of childrens literature, best known for his collaborations with illustrator Lane Smith. ... Marilyn Singer, Author of over 70 books for Children and Young Adults. ... Darin Strauss Darin Strauss (born March 1, 1970) is an American writer based in Brooklyn, NY. Both of his novels were The New York Times Notable Books; Strauss is a 2006 recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, and he currently resides in Brooklyn, New York. ... Ned Vizzini, birth name Edison Vizzini, (b. ... Mo Willems (born February 11, 1968) is an American writer, animator, and childrens books author/illustrator. ... Brian Wood (born January 29, 1972) is a writer, illustrator, and graphic designer living in Brooklyn, New York. ...

Political figures

James F. Brennan of Brooklyn is a New York Assemblyman elected in 1984 to represent the 44th district. ... Hugh Leo Carey (born April 11, 1919) was the Governor of New York between 1975 and 1983. ... Caroline Bouvier Kennedy Schlossberg (born November 27, 1957) is the daughter and only surviving child of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and his wife, Jacqueline. ... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is a Jewish American politician. ...

See also

December 17 front page of Syracuse Post-Standard The 1960 New York air disaster was a collision in December 16, 1960 between two airlines over Staten Island, New York in which one plane crashed into Staten Island and the other airline crashed into a Brooklyn neighborhood. ... These are the neighborhoods of Brooklyn, one of five boroughs of New York City. ... A streetcar suburb is a community whose growth and development was strongly shaped by the use of streetcar lines as a primary means of transportation. ...

References

  1. ^ South Park Slope Rezoning - Approved, New York City Department of City Planning. Accessed October 8, 2007.
  2. ^ Park Slope neighborhood profile, New York (magazine), extracted from a March 10, 2003 article. Accessed September 25, 2007. "Boundaries: Stretching from Prospect Park West to 4th Avenue, Park Place to Prospect Expressway."
  3. ^ Oser, Alan N. "Rezoning, and Redefining, Park Slope", The New York Times, December 28, 2003. Accessed September 25, 2007. 'As broadly defined by brokers marketing real estate there, Park Slope runs all the way from Flatbush Avenue on the north to the Prospect Park Expressway on the south, and from Prospect Park and Prospect Park West to Fourth Avenue on the east. The April rezoning actually goes as far as Third Avenue on some blocks, and only to 15th Street on the south."
  4. ^ Brooklyn Public Library, accessed August 17, 2006
  5. ^ Oser, Alan. "Rezoning, and Redefining, Park Slope", The New York Times, December 28, 2003. Retrieved on 2007-06-02. 
  6. ^ Natural Home. "America's Best Eco-Neighborhoods." December 6, 2006.[1]
  7. ^ Dodgers Ballparks, accessed May 27, 2006
  8. ^ Nathaniel Altman. "Pillar of Fire, Recalling the Day the Sky Fell, December 16, 1960", Park Slope Reader, October 7, 2004. 
  9. ^ Megan Cossey. "Replanting the Rainbow Flag", The New York Times, January 16, 2005. 
  10. ^ Urban Gentry, Ford Foundation Report, Spring 2003
  11. ^ Lee, Linda. "A NIGHT OUT AT THE: Paramount Hotel; The Pajama Game", The New York Times, May 27, 2001. Accessed November 3, 2007. "A product of St. Ann's School in Brooklyn, Mr. Abrahams, 23, had invited a batch of friends from high school to join him. He lives in North Park Slope, exactly 41 minutes from here, he said."

New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Headquarters New York magazine is a weekly magazine, founded in 1968, concerned with the life, culture, politics, and style of New York City. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Ford Foundation is a charitable foundation incorporated in Michigan and based in New York City created to fund programs that promote democracy, reduce poverty, promote international understanding, and advance human achievement. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Park Slope, Brooklyn (1) (4637 words)
The Park Slope District, centering about the Grand Army Plaza entrance to Prospect Park at the intersection of Flatbush Avenue and Eastern Parkway, has been since the mid-nineteenth century Brooklyn's "Gold Coast." In the quiet streets off the plaza are rows of residences that rival the mansions on Manhattan's Fifth Avenue.
The park is the chief playground of Brooklyn, with picnic grounds, tennis courts, baseball diamonds, ponds, a zoo, a lagoon, parade grounds, bandstand, gravel walks, and broad driveways.
The lake curves around the southern edge of the park; boating in summer, ice skating in winter, attract many of the park's 75,000 weekly visitors On the north side of the lake is the miniature yacht boathouse, housing the sloops which dot the wide water front in mild weather.
New York Architecture Images- Park Slope, Brooklyn (12064 words)
The park is the chief playground of Brooklyn, with picnic grounds, tennis courts, baseball diamonds, ponds, a zoo, a lagoon, parade grounds, bandstand, gravel walks, and broad driveways.
The slope of Park Slope descends gradually from northeast to southwest, leading to the terminology North Slope (from Flatbush Avenue to Union Street), Center Slope (from the south side of Union Street to Fifth or Sixth Streets) and South Slope beyond that.
Park Slope Estates, with 38 condominium apartments in six buildings, was the first project of its kind in the area.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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