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Encyclopedia > Park Avenue South
Park Avenue in the Upper East Side (2004)
Park Avenue in the Upper East Side (2004)

Park Avenue (formerly Fourth Avenue) is a wide boulevard that carries traffic north and south in Manhattan in New York City. Throughout most of its duration it runs parallel to Madison Avenue, to the west, and Lexington Avenue, to the east. The thoroughfare is noted for its perennially high real estate prices and affluent reputation, especially as it runs through the Upper East Side. Download high resolution version (480x640, 203 KB)I took this photo of Park Avenue in New York City in Aug 2004 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (480x640, 203 KB)I took this photo of Park Avenue in New York City in Aug 2004 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This photo, showing the architectural mix on the Upper East Side, was taken from 87th Street and Second Avenue. ... Manhattan Borough,highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... The city is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture, and is one of the worlds major global cities (along with London, Tokyo and Paris) with a virtually unrivaled collection of museums, galleries, performance venues, media outlets, international corporations, and stock exchanges. ... Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City which carries northbound one-way traffic. ... Lexington Avenue is an avenue on the East Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that carries southbound one-way traffic from East 131st Street to Gramercy Park at East 21st Street. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... This photo, showing the architectural mix on the Upper East Side, was taken from 87th Street and Second Avenue. ...


The road that becomes Park Avenue originates just above City Hall as Lafayette Street, a one-way avenue carrying southbound traffic. At Spring Street, traffic direction becomes northbound only. From 8th Street to 14th Street, it is known as Fourth Avenue. Above 14th Street, it becomes a north-south thoroughfare. From 14th Street to 17th Street, it forms Union Square's eastern boundary, and is known as Union Square East; its southbound lanes merge with Broadway (Manhattan) for this distance. From 17th Street to 32nd Street, it is known as Park Avenue South, and for the remainder of its distance it is known as Park Avenue. ... 14th Street is an important thoroughfare in Manhattan in New York City. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City, and is the oldest north-south main thoroughfare in the city, dating to the first New Amsterdam settlement. ...


Between 33rd Street and 40th Street, its two center lanes, one in each direction, descend into the Murray Hill Tunnel. Immediately across from 40th Street, these center lanes rise onto an elevated structure that goes over and around Grand Central Terminal, carrying each direction on opposite sides of the building, which takes up the space formerly occupied by Park Avenue from 42nd Street to 45th Street. The bridge, one of two structures known as the Park Avenue Viaduct, returns to ground level at 46th Street after going through the Helmsley Building (also called the New York Central Building, 230 Park Ave.). This article covers streets in Manhattan, New York City, USA between and including 23rd Street and 42nd Street. ... This article covers streets in Manhattan, New York City, USA between and including 23rd Street and 42nd Street. ... The north end of the tunnel The Murray Hill Tunnel passes under Park Avenue in Manhattan, New York, New York, USA, just south of Grand Central Terminal. ... Grand Central Terminal, along 42nd Street, next to the Grand Hyatt New York and the Chrysler Building Grand Central Terminal (often still called Grand Central Station, although technically that is the name of the nearby post office and New York City Subway station on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line) is... 42nd Street, NYC 42nd Street is a major crosstown street in the New York City borough of Manhattan, known for its theaters, especially near the intersection with Broadway at Times Square. ...


As Park Avenue enters Midtown north of Grand Central, it is distinguished by many glass-box skyscrapers that serve as headquarters for corporations such as JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup, and MetLife. View of Midtown from Empire State Building. ... JPMorgan Chase & Co. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... MetLife, Inc. ...


From Grand Central to 97th Street, Metro-North Railroad tracks run in a tunnel underneath Park Avenue (the Park Avenue Tunnel). At 97th, the tracks come above ground, rising onto the other structure known as the Park Avenue Viaduct. The first street to pass under the viaduct is 102nd Street; from there to the Harlem River the railroad viaduct runs down the middle of Park Avenue. Marble Hill station The Metro-North Railroad (officially the Metro-North Commuter Railroad Company, and usually abbreviated as Metro-North) is a suburban commuter railroad service between New York City to its northern suburbs in New York State and Connecticut. ... The Harlem River, shown in red, between the Bronx and Manhattan in New York City The Harlem River is a tidal strait in New York City, USA that flows 8 miles between the East River and the Hudson River, separating the borough of Manhattan from the Bronx. ...


Park Avenue ends north of 132nd Street, with connections to FDR Drive. The name is continued on the other side of the river in the Bronx by the street just east of the railroad; see Park Avenue (Bronx). FDR Drive is a major freeway-standard parkway on the east side of the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States. ...


The following corporations are headquartered on Park Avenue:

Altria Group, Inc. ... The Bankers Trust is a historic US banking organisation that was merged with Deutsche Bank in 1998, but continues to operate under that name. ... Bloomberg L.P. is a financial news service founded by Michael Bloomberg in 1981. ... Bristol-Myers Squibb (NYSE: BMY) is a pharmaceutical corporation, formed by a merger between two smaller pharmaceutical companies. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Colgate-Palmolive Company NYSE: CL is a multinational corporation in the business of the provision of products such as soaps, detergents, and oral hygiene products such as toothpaste and toothbrushes. ... JPMorgan Chase & Co. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in the world. ... MetLife, Inc. ...

History

Park Avenue was originally known as Fourth Avenue and carried the tracks of the New York and Harlem Railroad starting in the 1830s. The railroad originally built an open cut through Murray Hill which was covered with grates and grass between 34th and 40th Street in the early 1850s. A section of this "park" was renamed Park Avenue in 1860. In 1867 the name applied all the way to 42nd Street. When Grand Central Depot was opened in the 1870s the railroad between 56th and 96th Street were sunk out of sight and in 1888, Park Avenue was extended to the Harlem River. An 1847 map of Lower Manhattan; the only railroad in Manhattan is the New York and Harlem Railroad. ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Murray Hill neighborhood of Manhattan derives its name from the Murray family, 18th-century Quaker merchants mainly concerned with shipping and overseas trade. ... // Events and Trends Technology Production of steel revolutionised by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Science Charles Darwin publishes The Origin of Species, putting forward the theory of evolution... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... 1867 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For the film of this name, see 42nd Street (film). ... Interior of Grand Central Terminal, circa 1920 Grand Central Terminal (often still called Grand Central Station, although technically that is the name of the nearby post office) is a train station at 15 Vanderbilt Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, New York, a borough of New York City, located at 42nd Street... Events and Trends Technology The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... The Harlem River, shown in red, between the Bronx and Manhattan in New York City The Harlem River is a tidal strait in New York City, USA that flows 8 miles between the East River and the Hudson River, separating the borough of Manhattan from the Bronx. ...

The railroad tunnel in 1941
The railroad tunnel in 1941

In 1936, an elevated structure was built around Grand Central Terminal to allow automobile traffic to pass the station unimpeded. In October 1937, a part of the Murray Hill Tunnel was reopened for road traffic. Image File history File links The Park Avenue railroad tunnel in Manhattan from 1941. ... Image File history File links The Park Avenue railroad tunnel in Manhattan from 1941. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Grand Central Terminal, along 42nd Street, next to the Grand Hyatt New York and the Chrysler Building Grand Central Terminal (often still called Grand Central Station, although technically that is the name of the nearby post office and New York City Subway station on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line) is... Look up October in Wiktionary, the free dictionary October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The north end of the tunnel The Murray Hill Tunnel passes under Park Avenue in Manhattan, New York, New York, USA, just south of Grand Central Terminal. ...


In 1959, the City Council changed the name of Fourth Avenue between 17th and 32nd Streets to Park Avenue South. In 1963, the Pan Am Building was built straddling Park Avenue atop Grand Central Terminal, with a tunnel through it to accommodate the automobile bridge. 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The MetLife Building in New York City The MetLife Building, formerly the Pan Am Building, is located at 200 Park Avenue in New York City. ...

Major Avenues of New York City
To the west
Madison Avenue
Park Avenue To the east
Lexington Avenue
WSH (12th) | 11th | 10th | 9th | 8th | 7th | 6th | 5th | Madison | Park (4th) | Lexington | 3rd | 2nd | 1st | FDR

  Results from FactBites:
 
Park Avenue (Manhattan) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (652 words)
Park Avenue (formerly Fourth Avenue) is a wide boulevard that carries traffic north and south in Manhattan in New York City.
As Park Avenue enters Midtown north of Grand Central, it is distinguished by many glass-box skyscrapers that serve as headquarters for corporations such as JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup, and MetLife.
Park Avenue was originally known as Fourth Avenue and carried the tracks of the New York and Harlem Railroad starting in the 1830s.
South Park (1380 words)
The parks were to be more convenient to the residents of that area of the city than the existing parks, as the area was experiencing very rapid growth and was quite distant from the northern park system already constructed.
Entrances were to be afforded from South Park Avenue on the east, and from Ridge Road on the south, with provision made for a third entrance from the north should city development necessitate it.
An additional entrance, at Electric Avenue in Lackwanna, was constructed in the 1930s as a convenience to the residents of the neighboring city, and was not closed until the late1980s, with the final remnants not removed until this past year.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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