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Encyclopedia > Paris Salon
Honoré Daumier satirized the bourgeoises scandalized by the Salon's Venuses, 1864

The Paris Salon (French: Salon de Paris) is the official art exhibition of the Académie des beaux-arts in Paris, France. This Year Venuses Again. ... This Year Venuses Again. ... Honoré Daumier (portrait by Nadar) Honoré Daumier (1808 – 1879) was a French caricaturist and painter. ... Art exhibitions are traditionally the space in which art objects (in the most general sense) meet an audience, a temporary presentation of art. ... The Académie des beaux-arts (Academy of Fine Arts) is a French learned society. ... The Eiffel Tower, the international symbol of the city, with the skyscrapers of La Défense business district 5 km/ 3 mi behind. ...


In 1673, the royally sanctioned French institution of art patronage, the Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture (a division of the Académie des beaux-arts), held its first semi-public art exhibit at the Salon Carré. Beginning in 1725 the salon was held in the Palace of the Louvre, when it became known as Salon de Paris. Events January 22 - Impostor Mary Carleton is hanged in Newgate prison in England for multiple thefts and returning from penal transportation March 18 - John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton sells his part of New Jersey to the Quakers. ... The Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture (Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture), Paris, was founded in 1648, modelled on Italian examples, such as the Accademia di San Luca in Rome. ... The Académie des beaux-arts (Academy of Fine Arts) is a French learned society. ... Events February 8 - Catherine I became empress of Russia February 20 - The first reported case of white men scalping Native Americans takes place in New Hampshire colony. ... I.M. Peis Louvre Pyramid: one of the entrances to the galleries lies below the glass pyramid. ...


The Salon's original focus was the display of the work of recent graduates of the École des Beaux-Arts, which was created by Cardinal Mazarin, chief minister of France, in 1648. Thereafter, the Salon influenced French high culture. Exhibition at the Salon de Paris was essential for any artist to achieve success in France for at least the next 200 years. Exhibition in the salon marked a sign of royal favor. École des Beaux-Arts (IPA ) refers to several art schools in France. ... Cardinal Jules Mazarin, French diplomat and statesman Jules Mazarin, born Giulio Raimondo Mazzarino; but best known as Cardinal Mazarin (July 14, 1602 – March 9, 1661) served as the France from 1642, until his death. ... // Events January 17 - Englands Long Parliament passes the Vote of No Address, breaking off negotiations with King Charles I and thereby setting the scene for the second phase of the English Civil War. ...


In 1737, the exhibitions became public and were held, at first, annually, and then biannually in odd number years. They would start on the feast day of St. Louis (August 25th) and run for some weeks. Once made regular and public, the salon's status was never seriously in doubt (Crow, 1987). Events 12 February — The San Carlo, the oldest working opera house in Europe, is inaugurated. ... Only representation of Saint Louis known to be true to life - Early 14th century statue from the church of Mainneville, Eure, France King Louis IX of France or Saint Louis (April 25, 1214/1215 – August 25, 1270) was King of France from 1226 until his death. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 129 days remaining. ...


The Salon exhibited paintings floor-to-ceiling and on every available inch of space. The jostling of artwork became the subject of many other paintings, including Pietro Antonio Martini's Salon of 1785. Printed catalogues of the Salons are primary documents for art historians. Critical descriptions of the exhibitions published in the gazettes marks the beginning of the modern occupation of art critic. A gazette is a newspaper. ... An art critic is normally a person who have a speciality in giving reviews mainly of the types of fine art you will find on display. Typically the art critic will go to an art exhibition where works of art are displayed in the traditional way in localities especially made...


In the 19th century the idea of a public salon extended to an annual government-sponsored juried exhibition of new painting and sculpture, held in large commercial halls, to which the ticket-bearing public was invited. The vernissage (varnishing) of opening night was a grand social occasion, and a crush that gave subject matter to newspaper caricaturists like Honoré Daumier. Charles Baudelaire and others wrote reviews of the salons. A vernissage (varnishing, from French), also known as a preview or private view, is the ceremonial start of an art exhibition. ... Honoré Daumier (portrait by Nadar) Honoré Daumier (1808 – 1879) was a French caricaturist and painter. ... Charles Baudelaire, photograph taken by Nadar. ...


The increasingly conservative and academic juries refused entry to the impressionist painters. In order to prove that the Salons were democratic, Napolean III instituted the Salon des Refusés that contained all the works that the Salon had rejected that year. It opened on May 17, 1863, marking the birth of the avant-garde. The Impressionists held their own exhibitions called the Impressionist Exhibitions in 1874, 1876, 1877, 1879, 1880, 1881, 1882 and 1886. Manet never exhibited in the Impressionist Exhibitions but continued to exhibit in the official Salon. In 1881 the government withdrew official sponsorship from the annual Salon, and a group of artists organised the Société des artistes français to take responsibility for the show. Birth of Venus, Alexandre Cabanel, 1863 Academic art is a style of painting and sculpture produced under the influence of European academies or universities. ... Impressionism was a 19th century art movement that began as a loose association of Paris-based artists who began publicly exhibiting their art in the 1860s. ... The Salon des Refusés (Salon of the Rejected) was an art exhibition in Paris. ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... See also Impressionist (entertainment): A girl with a watering can by Renoir, 1876 Impressionism was a 19th century art movement, which began as a private association of Paris-based artists who exhibited publicly in 1874. ... 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... Édouard Manet - 19th century French painter Mobile_ad-hoc_network - A self configuring wireless network This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Société des artistes français is the administrative group of the Salon de Paris formed in 1881 when the French government withdrew official sponsorship from the annual Salon. ...


In 1903, in response to what many artists at the time felt was a bureaucratic and conservative organization, a group of painters and sculptors led by Pierre-Auguste Renoir and Auguste Rodin, organized the Salon d'Automne. 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Pierre-Auguste Renoir Pierre-Auguste Renoir (February 25, 1841 – December 3, 1919) was a French artist who painted in the impressionist style. ... Auguste Rodin Rodins The Burghers of Calais in Calais, France. ... First Salon dAutomne Catalog In 1903, the first Salon dAutomne (Fall Salon) was organized as a reaction to the conservative policies of the official Paris Salon. ...


See also

Albert Henry Krehbiel (November 25, 1873 _ June 29, 1945) was an American impressionist painter. ... A salon is a gathering of stimulating people of quality under the roof of an inspiring hostess or host, partly to amuse one another and partly to refine their taste and increase their knowledge through conversation and readings, often consciously following Horaces definition of the aims of poetry, to... From the seventeenth century to the early part of the twentieth century, artistic production in France was controled by artistic academies which organized official exhibitions called salons. ... The Salon des Refusés (Salon of the Rejected) was an art exhibition in Paris. ... Birth of Venus, Alexandre Cabanel, 1863 Academic art is a style of painting and sculpture produced under the influence of European academies or universities. ... The Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture (Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture), Paris, was founded in 1648, modelled on Italian examples, such as the Accademia di San Luca in Rome. ... The Académie des beaux-arts (Academy of Fine Arts) is a French learned society. ...

References

  • Marquet de Vasselot, J.J. Répertoire des catalogues du musée du Louvre, 1793- 1917
  • Crow, Thomas Painters and Public Life in 18th Century Paris, Yale University Press 1987
  • Timeline of the Paris salons

  Results from FactBites:
 
Paris Salon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (541 words)
The Paris Salon (French: Salon de Paris) is the official art exhibition of the Académie des beaux-arts in Paris, France.
The Salon's original focus was the display of the work of recent graduates of the École des Beaux-Arts, which was created by Cardinal Mazarin, chief minister of France, in 1648.
In the 19th century the idea of a public salon extended to an annual government-sponsored juried exhibition of new painting and sculpture, held in large commercial halls, to which the ticket-bearing public was invited.
Salon (gathering) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (842 words)
The salons, commonly associated with French literary and philosophical salons of the 17th century and 18th century, were carried on until quite recently in urban settings among like-minded people of a 'set': many 20th-century salons could be instanced.
The most famous of the literary salons of Paris formed in the 1620s were the Hôtel de Rambouillet by Madame de Rambouillet and the rival salon that gathered around Madeleine de Scudéry.
The Paris Salon was originally an officially-sanctioned exhibit of recent works of painting and sculpture by members of the Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture, starting in 1673 and soon moving from the Salon Carré of the Palace of the Louvre.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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