FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Paris (mythology)

See List of King Priam's children The following is a list of the known children of the trojan king Priam. ...

Statue of Paris in the British Museum

Paris (Greek: Πάρις; also known as Alexander or Alexandros, c.f. Alaksandus of Wilusa), mythological son of Priam, king of Troy, appears in a number of Greek legends. Probably the best-known was his abduction of, or elopement with, Helen, queen of Sparta, this being one of the immediate causes of the Trojan War. Later in the war, he fatally wounds Achilles in the heel with an arrow, as foretold by Achilles' mother, Thetis. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (343x640, 91 KB) Summary photo taken by lonpicman Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (343x640, 91 KB) Summary photo taken by lonpicman Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... The British Museum in London, England is one of the worlds greatest museums of human history and culture. ... // Paris is the capital of France. ... Alaksandu is addressed as king of Wilusa by Muwatalli II in ca. ... Walls of the excavated city of Troy This article is about the city of Troy / Ilion as described in the works of Homer, and the location of an ancient city associated with it. ... King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... “Helen of Troy” redirects here. ... For other uses see Sparta (disambiguation). ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ...

Contents

Paris' childhood

In Greek mythology Paris was the child of Priam and Hecuba; just before his birth, his mother dreamed that she gave birth to a flaming torch. This dream was interpreted by the seer Aesacus as a foretelling of the downfall of Troy, and he declared that the child would be the ruin of his homeland. On the day of Paris' birth it was further announced by Aesacus that the child born of a royal Trojan that day would have to be killed to spare the kingdom, being the child that would bring about the prophecy. Though Paris was indeed born before nightfall, he was spared by Priam; Hecuba, too, was unable to kill the child, despite the urging of the priestess of Apollo, one Herophile. Instead, Paris' father prevailed upon his chief herdsman, Agelaus, to remove the child and kill him. The herdsman, unable to use a weapon against the infant, left him exposed on Mount Ida, hoping he would perish there (cf: Oedipus); he was, however, suckled by a she-bear. Returning after nine days, Agelaus was astonished to find the child still alive, and brought him home in a backpack (πήρα, hence Paris' name, which means "backpack") to rear as his own. He returned to Priam bearing a dog's tongue as evidence of the deed's completion. [1] King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Consulting the Oracle by John William Waterhouse, showing eight priestesses in a temple of prophecy An oracle is a person or persons considered to be the source of wise counsel or prophetic opinion; an infallible authority, usually spiritual in nature. ... Aesacus or Aisakos in Greek mythology was a son of King Priam of Troy. ... Roman Catholic priest A priest or priestess is a holy man or woman who takes an officiating role in worship of any religion, with the distinguishing characteristic of offering sacrifices. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... In antiquity, the oracular seeresses of the Ancient Near East and the Mediterranean were referred to by the Greek term Sibyls. ... In Greek mythology, Agelaus, or Ageláos was a suitor of Penelope, killed by Odysseus. ... Two sacred mountains are called Mount Ida in Greek mythology, equally named Mount of the Goddess. ... For other uses, see Oedipus (disambiguation). ...


Paris' noble birth was betrayed by his outstanding beauty and intelligence; while still a child he routed a gang of cattle-thieves and restored the animals they had stolen to the herd, thereby earning the surname Alexander ("protector of men")[1]. It was at this time that Oenone became Paris' first lover. She was a nymph from Mount Ida in Phrygia. Her father was Cebren, a river-god (other sources declare her to be the daughter of Oeneus). She was skilled in the arts of prophecy and medicine, which she had been taught by Rhea and Apollo respectively. When Paris later left her for Helen she told him that if ever he was wounded, he should come to her for she could heal any injury, even the most serious wounds. In Greek mythology, Oenone (wine woman) was the first wife of Paris. ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... In antiquity, Phrygia (Greek: ) was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolia. ... Cebren was a Greek river-god (an Oceanid), whose river was located near Troy. ... Mythological personifications of rivers (river gods, river goddesses) and of the sea or the ocean // [edit] Sea deities [edit] Greek Oceanus and Tethys Proteus Triton Nereids Poseidon/Neptune [edit] Vedic Sea deities are much less common in Vedic than in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Oeneus, or Oineus was a Calydonian king, son of Porthaon, husband of Althaea and father of Deianira, Meleager and Melanippe. ... For other uses, see Prophecy (disambiguation). ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Rhea (or Ria meaning she who flows) was the Titaness daughter of Uranus and of Gaia. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... “Helen of Troy” redirects here. ...


Paris' chief distraction at this time was to pit Agelaus' bulls against one another. One bull began to win these bouts consistently, and Paris began to set it against rival herdsmen's own prize bulls; it defeated them all. Finally Paris offered a golden crown to any bull that could defeat his champion. Ares responded to this challenge by transforming himself into a bull and easily winning the contest. Paris gave the crown to Ares without hesitation; it was this apparent honesty in judgment that prompted the gods of Olympus to have Paris arbitrate the divine contest between Hera, Aphrodite and Athena (though it may be noted that Paris did not maintain the same level of disinterest here). Bulls may refer to several things: Male cattle Blue Bulls, a rugby club in South Africa Belfast Bulls, an american football team in Northern Ireland Belleville Bulls, a junior ice hockey team in Ontario, Canada Bulldog, of which there are many different breeds Bulls, a rugby club in South Africa... This article is about the ancient Greek god; for other uses, see Ares (disambiguation). ... Mount Olympus (Greek: ; also transliterated as Mount Ólympos, and on modern maps, Óros Ólimbos) is the highest mountain in Greece at 2,919 meters high (9,576 feet)[1]. Since its base is located at sea level, it is one of the highest mountains in Europe, in real absolute altitude... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ...


The Judgment of Paris

Main article: Judgment of Paris This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: spelling redirect If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ...

In celebration of the marriage of Peleus and Thetis, Lord Zeus, father of the Greek pantheon, hosted a banquet on Mount Olympus. Every deity and demi-god had been invited, except Eris, the goddess of strife; no one wanted a troublemaker at a wedding. For revenge, Eris threw the golden Apple of Discord inscribed with the word "Kallisti" — "For the most beautiful one" — into the party, provoking a squabble among the attendant goddesses over for whom it had been meant. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Judgment of Paris, Peter Paul Rubens, ca 1636 (National Gallery, London) For the wine-tasting event known as The Judgment of Paris, see Paris Wine Tasting of 1976 The Judgement of Paris is a story from Greek mythology, in which the legendary roots of the Trojan War can be... Michelangelos design for Capitoline Hill, now home to the Capitoline Museums. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Peleus consigns Achilles to Chirons care, white-ground lekythos by the Edinburgh Painter, ca. ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... The Oricoli bust of Zeus, King of the Gods, in the collection of the Vatican Museum. ... Mount Olympus (Greek: ; also transliterated as Mount Ólympos, and on modern maps, Óros Ólimbos) is the highest mountain in Greece at 2,919 meters high (9,576 feet)[1]. Since its base is located at sea level, it is one of the highest mountains in Europe, in real absolute altitude... Eris (ca. ... An apple of discord is a reference to the Golden Apple of Discord which, according to Greek mythology, the goddess Eris (Gr. ... Kallisti is a word from the Greek language. ...


The goddesses thought to be the most beautiful were Hera, Athena, and Aphrodite, and each one claimed the apple. They started a quarrel so they asked Zeus to choose one of them. However, he couldn't decide and thought a mortal should, thus, Paris was appointed by Zeus to select the most beautiful. Escorted by Hermes, the three goddesses approached Paris as he herded his cattle on Mount Garagarus. They immediately attempted to bribe him to choose among them - Hera offered political power, riches and control of all of Asia; Athena offered skill in battle, wisdom and the abilities of the greatest warriors; and Aphrodite offered Helen of Troy, the most beautiful woman on Earth. Paris chose Aphrodite—and Helen. For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Helen was the wife of Menelaus and reputed to be the most beautiful woman in the world, and her abduction by Paris brought about the Trojan War. ...


Problematically, Helen was already married to King Menelaus of Sparta, so Paris had to raid Menelaus's house to steal Helen from him. (According to some accounts, she fell in love with Paris and left willingly.) The Greeks' expedition to retrieve Helen from Paris in Troy is the mythological basis of the Trojan War. This triggered the war because Helen was famous for her beauty throughout Achaea (ancient Greece), and had many suitors of extraordinary ability. Therefore, following Odysseus's advice, her father Tyndareus made all suitors promise to defend Helen's marriage to the man she chose. When she disappeared to Troy, Menelaus invoked this oath. Helen's other suitors—who between them represented the lion's share of Achaea's strength, wealth and military prowess—were obligated to help bring her back. Thus, the whole of Greece moved against Troy in force. The Trojan War had begun. Menelaus regains Helen, detail of an Attic red-figure crater, ca. ... Achaea (Greek: , Achaïa; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is an ancient province and a present prefecture of Greece, on the northern coast of the Peloponnese, stretching from the mountain ranges of Erymanthus and Cyllene on the south to a narrow strip of fertile land on the... For other meanings, see Odysseus crater, 1143 Odysseus “Ulysses” redirects here. ... In Greek mythology, Tyndareus (or Tyndareos) was a Spartan king, son of Oebalus (or Perieres) and Gorgophone (or Bateia), husband of Leda and father of Helen, Polydeuces (Pollux), Castor, Clytemnestra, Timandra, Phoebe and Philonoe. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ...


Paris and the Trojan War

In Homer's Iliad, Paris is portrayed as fairly unskilled and not incredibly brave. His brother Hector frequently criticizes him for this, though Paris readily admits his shortcomings in battle. The fact that he prefers to use a bow and arrow emphasize this, since he does not follow the code of honor of the other heroes, and it is speculated that in order to hit Achilles, he hit him from behind. title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... For other uses, see Hector (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ...


Early in the epic, Paris and Menelaus duel in an attempt to end the war without further bloodshed. Menelaus easily defeats Paris, though Aphrodite spirits him away before Menelaus can finish the duel. Paris is returned to his bedchambers where Aphrodite forces Helen to be with him. The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ...


Paris' second attempt at combat is equally faced; rather than engage the Greek hero Diomedes in melee combat, Paris wounds Diomedes with an arrow through the foot. Diomedes challenges him to fight despite his wound and Paris flees. Diomēdēs or Diomed (Gk:Διομήδης - God-like cunning or advised by Zeus) is a hero in Greek mythology, mostly known for his participation in the Trojan War. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


Tradition holds that Paris killed Achilles later in the war. Many accounts attribute it to an arrow guided by Apollo. For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ...


When Paris was mortally wounded late on in the war by Philoctetes, Helen made her way to Mount Ida where she begged Paris' former lover Oenone to heal him. She refused and returned to Troy, where he died later the same day. Sources state that her refusal was based on Paris' betrayal of her and saw his death as a just punishment. She felt betrayed in two ways in that Paris left her first, to reclaim his rightful place in Troy and then second, fell in love and took Helen as his wife and didn't bother about her. But, regardless of both reasons, Oenone still loved him, so when she heard of his funeral, she ran onto his funeral pyre and threw herself in its fire. In Greek mythology, Philoctetes (also Philoktêtês or Philocthetes, Φιλοκτήτης) was the son of King Poeas of Meliboea in Thessaly. ...


After Paris' death, his brother Deiphobus married Helen until he was killed mercilessly by Menelaus when he invaded Troy to take back Helen. In Greek mythology, Deiphobus was a son of Priam and Hecuba. ... “Helen of Troy” redirects here. ... Menelaus regains Helen, detail of an Attic red-figure crater, ca. ...


Paris in the arts

The scene of Paris presenting an apple to (one of) the goddesses Athena, Aphrodite, and Hera (most commonly called the "Judgement of Paris") is common in post-classical western art. For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... The Judgment of Paris, Peter Paul Rubens, ca 1636 (National Gallery, London) For the wine-tasting event known as The Judgment of Paris, see Paris Wine Tasting of 1976 The Judgement of Paris is a story from Greek mythology, in which the legendary roots of the Trojan War can be...


Ovid presents us with a seductive letter from Paris to Helen, from his Heroides [2]. For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC – 17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... Heroides (The Heroines) or Epistulae Heroidum (Letters of Heroines) was a work composed by Ovid in 5 BC. It is composed of fifteen fictional letters as if written by mythological heroines of antiquity grieving over their lovers mistreatment or neglect. ...


In the Divine Comedy Dante sees the soul of Paris in the second circle of Hell, being tossed around eternally by a fierce wind, along with Helen and others who succumbed to the sin of lust. Detail of a manuscript in Milans Biblioteca Trivulziana (MS 1080), written in 1337 by Francesco di ser Nardo da Barberino, showing the beginning of Dantes Comedy. ... DANTE is also a digital audio network. ... For other uses, see Sin (disambiguation). ... Lust is any intense desire or craving for self gratification. ...


Later treatments

  • In the 1956 film Helen of Troy, Paris, as the main character, is portrayed as a heroic character who at first worships peace and love but is later forced to take up arms against the treacherous Greeks.
  • In the 2004 Hollywood film Troy, the character Paris was played by actor Orlando Bloom. He is not killed by Philoctetes in this version, but leaves the falling city of Troy together with Helen and survives.
  • In prose he appears as the main character in Rudolf Hagelstange's book Spielball der Götter (Game of Gods).
  • The Judgment of Paris and its aftermath are the subject of Michael Tippett's 1962 opera King Priam.

Helen of Troy is a 1956 Warner Bros. ... Troy is an Oscar-nominated movie released on May 14, 2004 about the Trojan War, as described in Homers Iliad, Virgils Aeneid, and other Greek myths. ... Orlando Jonathan Blanchard Bloom[1] (born 13 January 1977) is an English actor. ... Sir Michael Kemp Tippett, O.M. (2 January 1905 – 8 January 1998) was one of the foremost English composers of the 20th century. ... See also: 1960s in music. ... King Priam is an opera by Michael Tippett, to his own libretto based on Homers Iliad. ...

Notes and References

  1. ^ For a comparison of hero births, including Sargon, Moses, Karna, Oedipus, Paris, Telephus, Perseus, Romulus, Gilgamesh, Cyrus, Jesus, and others, reference:
    Rank, Otto. The Myth of the Birth of the Hero. Vintage Books: New York, 1932.

Sargon may refer to: Sargon of Akkad (Šarrukînu, also known as Sargon the Great, Sargon I), Mesopotamian king, founder of the city of Agade and the Akkadian dynasty, unifier of Sumer and Akkad (2334 BC - 2279 BC). ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Karna (Sanskrit: कर्ण written Karṇa in IAST transliteration) is one of the central figures in Hindu epic Mahabharata. ... For other uses, see Oedipus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... A Greek mythological figure, Telephus referred to two different people. ... Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, and was the hero who killed Medusa. ... Romulus may refer to any of these articles: Romulus is a mythical founder of Rome, brother of Remus. ... For other uses, see Gilgamesh (disambiguation). ... The name Cyrus (or Kourosh in Persian) may refer to: [[Cyrus I of Anshan]], King of Persia around 650 BC [[Cyrus II of Persia | Cyrus the Great]], King of Persia 559 BC - 529 BC — See also Cyrus in the Judeo-Christian tradition Cyrus the Younger, brother to the Persian king... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Otto Rank (April 22, 1884 – October 31, 1939) was an Austrian psychologist. ...

External links

  • 'The Judgement of Paris' by William Etty at the Lady Lever Art Gallery
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Paris (mythology)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Greek mythology N-Z - All About Turkey (3951 words)
In Greek mythology, Peirithous was a King of the Lapiths and a son of Ixion and Dia.
In Greek mythology, Proteus was a son of Abas and the twin brother of Acrisius.
In Greek mythology, Xuthus was a son of Helen by the nymph Orseis.
Paris (mythology) - MSN Encarta (265 words)
Paris (mythology), also called Alexander, in Greek mythology, son of Priam and Hecuba, king and queen of Troy.
A prophecy had warned that Paris would someday be the ruin of Troy and, therefore, Priam exposed him on Mount Ida, where he was found and brought up by shepherds.
Paris favored Aphrodite, even though at the time he was in love with the nymph Oenone.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m