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Encyclopedia > Parallel key

In music, the parallel minor or tonic minor of a particular major key is the minor key with the same tonic; similarly the parallel major has the same tonic as the minor key. For example, G major and G minor have different modes but both have the same tonic, G; so we say that G minor is the parallel minor of G major. For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... In music theory, the key identifies the tonic triad, the chord, major or minor, which represents the final point of rest for a piece, or the focal point of a section. ... The tonic is the first note of a musical scale, and in the tonal method of music composition it is extremely important. ... This article is about modes as used in music. ...


In the early nineteenth century, composers began to experiment with freely borrowing chords from the parallel key.


To the Western ear, the switch from a major key to its parallel minor sounds like a fairly simplistic "saddening" of the mood (while the opposite sounds like a "brightening"). This change is quite distinct from a switch to the relative minor. In music, the relative minor of a particular major key (or the relative major of a minor key) is the key which has the same key signature but a different tonic, as opposed to parallel minor or major, respectively. ...


Calculating the key signature of the parallel major or minor key

Flats always appear in the order B-E-A-D-G-C-F. Sharps always appear in the order F-C-G-D-A-E-B.


For example, if there are 3 flats in the key signature, those flats would be B, E, and A. If there are 2 sharps in the key signature, they would be F and C.

  • To find the parallel minor of a key, add 3 flats to the key signature.
For example, F major has 1 flat (B). Adding 3 flats would yield 4 flats, meaning F minor consists of B, E, A, and D flat.
B major has 5 sharps (F, C, G, D, A). To find B minor, add 3 flats. Since flats cancel out sharps, one is left with 2 sharps (F and C).
  • To find the parallel major, add 3 sharps.
E minor to E major: E minor has 1 sharp (F). Add 3 to get 4 sharps (F, C, G, D).
F minor to F major: F minor has 4 flats (B, E, A, D). Add 3 sharps to get 1 flat (B).

See also

In music, the relative minor of a particular major key (or the relative major of a minor key) is the key which has the same key signature but a different tonic, as opposed to parallel minor or major, respectively. ... In music harmonic parallelism, also known as harmonic planing or parallel voice leading, is the parallel movement of two or more lines or chords (harmonies). ... For information on major/minor tonality, see Tonality or Major and minor // This term is used to refer to a musical composition that begins in a major key and ends in a minor key (generally the tonic minor), specifying the keynote (as C major/minor). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Parallel key - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (218 words)
In music, the parallel minor of a particular major key is the minor key with the same tonic; similarly the parallel major of a minor key has the same tonic.
For example, G major and G minor have different modes but both have the same tonic, G; so we say that G minor is the parallel minor of G major.
In the early nineteenth century, composers (notably Robert Schumann) began to experiment with freely borrowing chords from the parallel key.
Borrowed chord - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (232 words)
A borrowed chord is a chord borrowed from the parallel key.
For instance, in major, a chord borrowed from the parallel minor's sixth degree is a "flat six chord" written ♭VI (or bVI if the flat is not available in the font).
Borrowing from a parallel major key is generally limited in western music to ending a minor piece on a major tonic triad, a chord which is then called a Picardy third.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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