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Encyclopedia > Paradise Regained

Paradise Regain'd is a poem by the 17th century English poet John Milton, published in 1671. It is connected by name to his earlier and more famous epic poem Paradise Lost, with which it shares similar theological themes. The writing style, however, is more thoughtful and thrives upon the imagery of Jesus' perfection in contrast to the shame of Satan, making it less epic than that of Paradise Lost, and accounting for why some consider this later work inferior. Poetry (ancient Greek: poieo = create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq... John Milton, English poet John Milton (December 9, 1608 – November 8, 1674) was an English poet, best-known for his epic poem Paradise Lost. ... Events May 9 - Thomas Blood, disguised as a clergyman, attempts to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. ... In mathematics, see epic morphism. ... Title page of the first edition Paradise Lost (1667) is a poopy epic poem by the 17th century English poet John Milton. ... Theology (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason) means reasoned discourse concerning religion, spirituality and God. ... In literature (as well as many works of nonfiction), a theme is the main idea of the story, or the message the author is conveying. ...


Based on the Gospel of Luke's version of the Temptations of Christ, Paradise Regained is four books in length, in contrast to Paradise Lost's twelve. In it Milton uses parody to show Satan's folly in stark contrast to Jesus, the epitome of perfect heroism. The Gospel of Luke is the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament, which tell the story of Jesus life, death, and resurrection. ... A temptation is an act that looks appealing to an individual. ... This page is about the title or the Divine Person. For the Christian figure, see Jesus. ... In contemporary usage, a parody is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Gustave Dorés depiction of Satan from John Miltons Paradise Lost Satan (Standard Hebrew: , Satan Tiberian Hebrew ; Koine Greek: , Satanás; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , , Slavic Сатана) is a term with its origins in the Abrahamic faiths which is traditionally applied to an angel, demon, or minor god in many belief systems. ... Jesus (8–2 BC/BCE to 29–36 AD/CE),[1] also known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity. ...


One of the major concepts emphasized throughout Paradise Regained is the use of reversals. As implied by its title, Milton sets out to reverse the 'loss' of Paradise. Thus, antonyms are often found next to each other throughout the story, reinforcing the idea that everything that was lost in the first epic is going to be regained by the end of the mini-epic.


Additionally, this work focuses on the idea of 'hunger', but in a literal and in a spiritual sense. After wandering in the wilderness for forty days Jesus is starved of both food and the Word of God. Satan, too blind to see any non-literal meanings of the term, offers Christ food and infinite power in order to satiate his hunger, but Jesus, 'hungering' for the Word of God, continually denies him. This creates an interesting connection between Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained, where in one the heroes fall victim to their hunger while in the other the hero resists the temptation and thus effectively reverses the fall of mankind from the first epic.

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External links

  • "Typology in Paradise Regained" by Gilbert McInnis
  • E-text from the John Milton Reading Room
  • Project Gutenberg text
  • (Recording) 'The Pilgrim and the Liar', A Narrative Song by Edward Waters (Grateful Acknowledgement to John Milton's Paradise Regained)
  • (Lyrics) 'The Pilgrim and the Liar', A Narrative Song by Edward Waters (Grateful Acknowledgement to John Milton's Paradise Regained)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Paradise Regained - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (343 words)
Paradise Regain'd is a poem by the 17th century English poet John Milton, published in 1671.
One of the major concepts emphasized throughout Paradise Regain'd is the use of reversals.
This creates an interesting connection between Paradise Lost and Paradise Regain'd, where in one the heroes fall victim to their hunger while in the other the hero resists the temptation and thus effectively reverses the fall of mankind from the first epic.
Paradise Lost - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4375 words)
Paradise Lost (1667) is an epic poem by the 17th century English poet John Milton.
Paradise brings him pain rather than pleasure and he reaffirms his decision to make evil his good.
Rather, such critics would uphold the theology of Paradise Lost insofar as it conforms to the passages of Scripture on which it is based.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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