FACTOID # 30: If Alaska were its own country, it would be the 26th largest in total area, slightly larger than Iran.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Parable" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Parable

Contents

A parable is a brief, succinct story, in prose or verse, that illustrates a moral or religious lesson. It differs from a fable in excluding animals, plants, inanimate objects, and forces of nature as actors that assume speech and other powers of humankind. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to the patterns of everyday [[speech. ... Verse is a writing that uses meter as its primary organisational mode, as opposed to prose, which uses grammatical and discoursal units like sentences and paragraphs. ... A moral is a one sentence remark made at the end of many childrens stories that expresses the intended meaning, or the moral message, of the tale. ... Religious is a term with both a technical definition and folk use. ... For a comparison of fable with other kinds of stories, see Myth, legend, fairy tale, and fable. ...


Characteristics

The word "parable" comes from the Greek "παραβολή" (parabolē), the name given by Greek rhetoricians to any fictive illustration in the form of a brief narrative. Later it came to mean a fictitious narrative, generally referring to something that might naturally occur, by which spiritual and moral matters might be conveyed. Image File history File links Ignacy_Krasicki_1. ... Image File history File links Ignacy_Krasicki_1. ... Ignacy Krasicki Ignacy Krasicki (February 3, 1735, in Galicia — March 14, 1801, in Berlin) was a Polish prince of the Roman Catholic Church, a social critic, a leading writer, and the outstanding poet of the Polish Enlightenment, hailed by contemporaries as the Prince of Poets. ... Rhetoric (from Greek ρητωρ, rhêtôr, orator) is one of the three original liberal arts or trivium (the other members are dialectic and grammar). ... The Three Graces, here in a painting by Sandro Botticelli, were the goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity and fertility in Greek mythology. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Look up spiritual in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A moral is a one sentence remark made at the end of many childrens stories that expresses the intended meaning, or the moral message, of the tale. ...


Examples of parable are Ignacy Krasicki's "The Blind Man and the Lame," "The King and the Scribes" and "The Drunkard." Ignacy Krasicki Ignacy Krasicki (February 3, 1735, in Galicia — March 14, 1801, in Berlin) was a Polish prince of the Roman Catholic Church, a social critic, a leading writer, and the outstanding poet of the Polish Enlightenment, hailed by contemporaries as the Prince of Poets. ... Fables and Parables (Bajki i przypowieści, 1779) by Ignacy Krasicki is an enduring classic of Polish literature. ... Fables and Parables (Bajki i przypowieści, 1779) by Ignacy Krasicki is an enduring classic of Polish literature. ... Fables and Parables (Bajki i przypowieści, 1779) by Ignacy Krasicki is an enduring classic of Polish literature. ...


A parable is the simplest of narratives. It sketches a setting, and describes an action and its results. It often involves a character facing a moral dilemma, or making a questionable decision and then suffering the consequences of that choice. Many folktales could be viewed as extended parables. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In drama, the set (or setting) is the location of a storys action. ... Action, as a concept in philosophy, is what humans can do. ... A result is the final consequence of a sequence of actions or events (broadly incidents and accidents) expressed qualitatively or quantitatively, being a loss, injury, disadvantage, advantage, gain, victory or simply a value. ... A moral is a one sentence remark made at the end of many childrens stories that expresses the intended meaning, or the moral message, of the tale. ... Look up Dilemma in Wiktionary, the free dictionary For the Nelly song, see Dilemma (song). ... Look up decision in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Consequence can be: Consequences is a game. ... Folklore is the ethnographic concept of the tales, legends, or superstitions current among a particular ethnic population, a part of the oral history of a particular culture. ...


The prototypical parable differs from the apologue in that it is an inherently probable and realistic story — one taking place in some familiar setting of life. Many fairy tales could be viewed as extended parables, except for their magical settings. The Prototype is what a Stereotype is called in cognitive linguitics. ... An apologue (from the Greek: απολογος, a statement or account) is a brief fable or allegorical story with pointed or exaggerated details, meant to serve as a pleasant vehicle for some moral doctrine or to convey some useful lesson without explicitly stating it. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Realism in the visual arts and literature is the depiction of subjects as they appear in everyday life, without embellishment or interpretation. ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... Magic Circle by John William Waterhouse Magic in fiction is the endowing of fictional characters or objects with magical powers. ...

Plato, according to Raphael.
Plato, according to Raphael.

As with a fable, a parable should relate a single, simple, consistent action, without extraneous detail nor distracting circumstances. In Plato's Republic, parables like that of the shadows in the cave encapsulate an abstract argument into a concrete, more easily grasped narrative. Image File history File links Plato-raphael. ... Image File history File links Plato-raphael. ... PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... Raphael Sanzio or Raffaello (April 6, 1483 – April 6, 1520) was an Italian master painter and architect of the Florentine school in High Renaissance, celebrated for the perfection and grace of his paintings. ... For a comparison of fable with other kinds of stories, see Myth, legend, fairy tale, and fable. ... PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... The Republic is an influential dialogue by Plato, written in the first half of the 4th century BC. This Socratic dialogue mainly is about political philosophy and ethics. ... Look up abstract, abstraction in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the philosophical term . ...


In the preface to his translation of Aesop's Fables, George Fyler Townsend defined "parable" as "the designed use of language purposely intended to convey a hidden and secret meaning other than that contained in the words themselves, and which may or may not bear a special reference to the hearer or reader." Reverend George Fyler Townsend (1814-1900) was the translator of the standard English edition of Aesops Fables. ...


A parable is like a metaphor that has been extended to form a brief, coherent fiction. Unlike the situation with a simile, a parable's parallel meaning is unspoken and implicit, though not ordinarily secret. Look up metaphor in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A simile is a comparison of two unlike things, typically marked by use of like, as or than. Examples include the snow was as thick as a blanket, or she was as smart as a crow. // Similes are widely used in literature, both modern and ancient. ...


Though parables often have a strong prescriptive subtext, suggesting how a person should behave or believe, many parables simply explore a concept from a neutral point of view. Aside from providing guidance and suggestions for proper action in life, parables offer a metaphorical language which allows people to more easily discuss difficult or complex ideas. In linguistics, prescription is the laying down or prescribing of normative rules of the language. ... Look up metaphor in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... IDEA may refer to: Electronic Directory of the European Institutions IDEA League Improvement and Development Agency Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Indian Distance Education Association Integrated Data Environments Australia Intelligent Database Environment for Advanced Applications IntelliJ IDEA - a Java IDE Interactive Database for Energy-efficient Architecture International IDEA (International Institute...


Parable and allegory are often treated as synonyms, but are well distinguished by H.W. Fowler in Modern English Usage: "The object in each is to enlighten the hearer by submitting to him a case in which he has apparently no direct concern, and upon which therefore a disinterested judgment may be elicited from him." It then dawns on the reader or listener that the conclusion applies equally well to his own concerns. The parable, however, is more condensed than the allegory: a single principle comes to bear, and a single moral is deduced. Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ... Synonyms can be nouns, adverbs or adjectives, as long as both members of the pair are the same part of speech. ... Henry Watson Fowler (10 March 1858 - 26 December 1933) was an English schoolmaster, lexicographer and commentator on usage, notable for both Fowlers Modern English Usage (first published 1926) and his work on the Concise Oxford Dictionary. ... A Dictionary of Modern English Usage, often referred to simply as Fowlers Modern English Usage, or Fowler, is a style guide to British English usage, authored by Henry W. Fowler. ... Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ... A principle (not principal) is something, usually a rule or norm, that is part of the basis for something else. ... A moral is a one sentence remark made at the end of many childrens stories that expresses the intended meaning, or the moral message, of the tale. ...


History

Parables are favored in the expression of spiritual concepts. The best-known source of parables in Christendom is the Bible, which contains numerous parables. Besides the familiar parables of Jesus in the New Testament, such as those of the Good Samaritan and the Prodigal Son, two parables in the Old Testament are the parable of the ewe-lamb told by Nathan in 2 Samuel 12:1-9, and that of the woman of Tekoah in 2 Samuel 14:1-13. Image File history File links Boschverloren. ... Image File history File links Boschverloren. ... The Return of the Prodigal Son (1773) by Pompeo Batoni The Prodigal Son, also known as The Lost Son is one of the best known parables of Jesus. ... Hieronymus Bosch; alleged portrait (around 1560) Hieronymus Bosch, also Jeroen Bosch, ( 1450 – August, 1516) was a prolific Dutch painter of the 15th and 16th century. ... Look up spiritual in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This T-and-O map, which abstracts the known world to a cross inscribed within an orb, remakes geography in the service of Christian iconography. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library of Congress. ... The parables of Jesus, found in the synoptic gospels, embody much of Jesus teaching. ... John 21:1 Jesus Appears to His Disciples--Alessandro Mantovani: the Vatican, Rome. ... The Good Samaritan The Good Samaritan is a famous New Testament parable, that appears only in the Gospel of Luke (10:25-37). ... The Return of the Prodigal Son (1773) by Pompeo Batoni The Prodigal Son, also known as The Lost Son is one of the best known parables of Jesus. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh. ... Nathan is a male given name, from Hebrew נתן meaning gift (standard Hebrew Natan, Yiddish Nussen or Nosson, Tiberian Hebrew Nāṯān). ...


Medieval biblical exegesis often treated Jesus' parables as detailed allegories, with symbolic correspondences found for every element in the brief narratives. Modern critics regard these interpretations as inappropriate and untenable. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... The Bible (From Greek βιβλια—biblia, meaning books, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported papyrus) is the sacred scripture of Christianity. ... Exegesis (from the Greek to lead out) involves an extensive and critical interpretation of a text, especially of a holy scripture, such as of the Old and New Testaments of the Bible, the Talmud, the Midrash, the Quran, etc. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Correspondence may refer to: In the theology of Emanuel Swedenborg, correspondence is the relationship between spiritual and physical realities. ...


Recently there has been interest in contemporary parable, exploring how modern stories can be used as parables. A mid-19th-century contemporary parable is the Parable of the broken window, which exposes a fallacy in economic thinking. For the periodical, see Nineteenth Century (periodical). ... The parable of the broken window was created by Frédéric Bastiat in his 1850 essay That Which is Seen and That Which is Not Seen to illuminate the notion of hidden costs ( opportunity costs). ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ...


References

Henry Watson Fowler (10 March 1858 - 26 December 1933) was an English schoolmaster, lexicographer and commentator on usage, notable for both Fowlers Modern English Usage (first published 1926) and his work on the Concise Oxford Dictionary. ... A Dictionary of Modern English Usage, often referred to simply as Fowlers Modern English Usage, or Fowler, is a style guide to British English usage, authored by Henry W. Fowler. ... Reverend George Fyler Townsend (1814-1900) was the translator of the standard English edition of Aesops Fables. ... Aesop, as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle by Hartmann Schedel. ...

See also

Fables and Parables (Bajki i przypowieści, 1779) by Ignacy Krasicki is an enduring classic of Polish literature. ... Ignacy Krasicki Ignacy Krasicki (February 3, 1735, in Galicia — March 14, 1801, in Berlin) was a Polish prince of the Roman Catholic Church, a social critic, a leading writer, and the outstanding poet of the Polish Enlightenment, hailed by contemporaries as the Prince of Poets. ... List of New Testament stories are stories from the New Testament of Christianity. ... The parables of Jesus, found in the synoptic gospels, embody much of Jesus teaching. ... The Rooster Prince, also sometimes translated as The Turkey Prince, is a parable by Rabbi Nachman of Breslov, founder of the Breslov form of Hasidic Judaism. ... Hasidic Judaism (Hebrew: Chasidut חסידות) is a Haredi Jewish religious movement. ...

External links

Look up parable in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Parable (706 words)
The best-known parables are those attributed to Jesus Christ in the New Testament, including the Good Samaritan, the Prodigal Son, the Sower and the Seed, and the Pearl of Great Price.
Coercion cloaked as generosity: disguised in Jesus' parable of the unforgiving slave is a power dynamic as true today as it was then.
The parables of the mustard seed and the yeast; Reflections Today.(Opinion/Editorial)
parable - Encyclopedia.com (490 words)
parable the term translates the Hebrew word "mashal" —a term denoting a metaphor, or an enigmatic saying or an analogy.
The parables of the mustard seed and of the yeast.(Opinion & Editorial)
Kingdom, Grace, Judgment: Paradox, Outrage, and Vindication in the Parables of Jesus.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m