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Encyclopedia > Papist

Papist is a term, usually disparaging, referring to a member of the Roman Catholic Church. It was coined during the English Reformation to indicate a Christian's loyalties were to the Pope, rather than to the native Protestant Church of England. Over time, however, it came to mean one who supported Papal authority over all Christians and thus became a popular term, especially among Anglicans and Presbyterians. The word ultimately derives from Latin papa, meaning "Pope". The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The current Pope is Benedict XVI (born Joseph Alois Ratzinger), who was elected at the age of 78 on 19 April 2005. ...


The word was in common use until the mid-nineteenth century; it occurs frequently in Macaulay's History of England from the Accession of James II, and in other historical or controversial works from that period. It survives in the British legal system one of the surviving relics of the Penal Laws, Catholic ineligibility to the throne under the current law of the United Kingdom. Under the Act of Settlement enacted in 1701 and still in force, no one who professes "the popish religion" or marries "a papist" may succeed to the throne of the United Kingdom. Fears that Roman Catholic secular leaders would be Anti-Protestant arose during the suppression of the Catholic Church in England during the reign of Henry VIII and the subsequent persecution of Protestants during the reign of the Roman Catholic Mary I of England. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Quotes His imagination resembled the wings of an ostrich. ... The Electress Sophia The Act of Settlement (12 & 13 Wm 3 c. ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Anti-Protestantism is an irrational opposition to Protestantism which is primarily emotional and akin to the irrational hatreds of racism and and anti-semitism. ... Silver groat of Henry VIII, minted ca. ... Mary Tudor is the name of both Mary I of England and her fathers sister, Mary Tudor (queen consort of France). ...


A derivative term Apist is used to describe Anglo-Catholics who ape or copy the practices of the Roman Catholics, including the wearing of brightly coloured and elaborately embroidered vestments and large, twin-peaked episcopal mitres. Apist may be used by Protestants believing such apparel to be effeminate and foreign to Anglo-Saxon traditions. The terms Anglo-Catholic and Anglo-Catholicism describe people, groups, ideas, customs and practices within Anglicanism that emphasise continuity with Catholic tradition. ... Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Anglican Churches. ... A mitre. ...


Currently loyalty to the Pope is sometimes indicated by the newer term "Papalism" with no pejorative intended. [1]


Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) author of Gulliver's Travels, frequently uses the term in his satirical work A Modest Proposal in which he proposes selling Irish children to wealthy English landlords for cannabilistic purposes. Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish priest, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer, and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and A Tale of a Tub. ... First Edition of Gullivers Travels Gullivers Travels (1726, amended 1735), officially Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, is a novel by Jonathan Swift that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the travellers tales literary sub-genre. ... A Modest Proposal: For Preventing the Children of Poor People in Ireland from Being a Burden to Their Parents or Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to the Publick, commonly referred to as A Modest Proposal, is a satirical pamphlet written by Jonathan Swift in 1729. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Papist - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (368 words)
Papist is a term, usually disparaging, referring to a member of the Roman Catholic Church.
It survives in the British legal system one of the surviving relics of the Penal Laws, Catholic ineligibility to the throne under the current law of the United Kingdom.
Fears that Roman Catholic secular leaders would be Anti-Protestant arose during the suppression of the Catholic Church in England during the reign of Henry VIII and the subsequent persecution of Protestants during the reign of the Roman Catholic Mary I of England.
Gilder Lehrman Center: Sources: (1321 words)
And be it enacted, That no Papist, or person professing the Popish or Roman Catholic religion shall be liable to, or subject to any penalty for not attending divine service on the Sabbath-day, called Sunday, in his or her parish church.
By the 10th clause, the estate of a Papist, for want of a Protestant heir, is to be divided, share and share alike, among all his sons; for want of sons, among his daughters; and, for want of daughters, among the collateral kindred of the father.
The 16th clause provides, that a Papist teaching school publicly, or in a private house, or as usher to a Protestant, shall be deemed and prosecuted as a Popish regular convict.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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