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Encyclopedia > Papal regalia and insignia

The most famous symbol of the Papacy is almost certainly the triregnum (a crown with three levels), also called the "tiara" or "triple crown"; recent Popes (since Pope John Paul I) have not, however, worn the triregnum. The tiara was not worn during liturgies. Instead the pope wears the episcopal mitre (an erect cloth hat). Modern popes do not bear a crozier (a bent pastoral staff styled after a shepherd's crook), but rather bear a staff topped by an erect crucifix, a custom established before the thirteenth century, though some popes since then, notably Pope Leo XIII, have used a crozier-like staff. A vestment restricted to the pope is the fanon, a double mozzetta, one of silk and gold, the first going under the stole and the second over the chasuble. The fanon has gone out of common use in recent times but its use has not been abolished as Pope John Paul II made use of the fanon on a few occasions. The Pope also uses the pallium (a circular band of fabric about two inches wide, worn over the chasuble about the neck, breast and shoulders and having two twelve-inch-long pendants hanging down in front and behind, ornamented with six small, black or red crosses distributed about the breast, back, shoulders, and pendants) at all ecclesiastical functions but not subject to the restrictions imposed upon archbishops upon whom the Pope has conferred the right to use the pallium. Traditionally, the Pope uses special satin slippers indoors, and papal shoes outdoors. Since the 13th Century many papal portraits have shown the pontiff wearing the camauro, a red velvet cap trimmed with ermine. The camauro fell out of fashion with the death of Pope John XXIII, but has recently been revived by Pope Benedict XVI. The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, or in Latin as the Triregnum, and in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown, supposedly of Byzantine and Persian origin, that is a symbol of the Roman Catholic papacy. ... The current Pope is Benedict XVI (born Joseph Alois Ratzinger), who was elected at the age of 78 on 19 April 2005. ... Pope John Paul I (in Latin ), born Albino Luciani (October 17, 1912 – September 28, 1978), reigned as pope and as sovereign of Vatican City from August 26, 1978 to September 28, 1978. ... A mitre. ... A crosier (crozier, pastoral staff) is the stylized staff of office carried by high-ranking Catholic prelates. ... A crucifix amidst the cornfields near Mureck in rural Styria, Austria A handheld crucifix A crucifix in front of the Holy Spirit Church in KoÅ¡ice, Slovakia A crucifix is a cross with a representation of Jesuss body, or corpus. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Pope Leo XIII (March 2, 1810 – July 20, 1903), born Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci, was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church, having succeeded Pope Pius IX (1846–78) on February 20, 1878 and reigning until his death in 1903. ... Pope John Paul II wearing the fanon on his shoulders. ... Pope Paul VI wearing the papal mozzetta. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), (Italian: Giovanni Paolo II), born   (May 18, 1920, Wadowice, Poland – April 2, 2005, Vatican City) reigned as Pope of the Roman... now. ... A fifteenth-century chasuble The chasuble is the outermost liturgical vestment worn by clergy for the celebration of the Eucharist in Western-tradition Christian Churches that use full vestments, primarily the Roman Catholic Church, high church congregations in the Anglican Church, and by some clergy in the United Methodist Church. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... Image:PapalSlippers. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Papal slippers. ... A camauro (from the Latin camelaucum, from Greek kamelauchion, meaning camel skin hat) is a cap traditionally worn by the Pope of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Blessed Pope John XXIII (Latin: ), (Italian: Giovanni XXIII), born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli (November 25, 1881 – June 3, 1963), was elected as the 261st Pope of the Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City on October 28, 1958. ... Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishops mitre, and pallium of the Pope was added beneath the coat of arms. ...


Equally famous as the triregnum and perhaps more important a symbol of the Papacy is the image of two keys, one gold and one silver, in saltire (i.e., crossed over one another so as to form an X), with a red cord tying them together. This represents the "Keys to the Kingdom of Heaven" (Matthew xvi: 19; cf. Isaiah xxii: 22) and is in many ways the quintessential symbol of the Papacy as an institution and of its central role within the Catholic Church. Jesus's definition of Petrine authority ("whatever you bind on Earth shall be bound in Heaven, and whatever you loose on Earth shall be loosed in Heaven") established two jurisdictions, Heaven and Earth; the silver and gold keys are said to represent these two jurisdictions. The silver key symbolises the power to bind and loose on Earth, and the gold key the power to bind and loose in Heaven. The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον) is one of the four Gospel accounts of the New Testament. ... The Book of Isaiah (Hebrew: Sefer Yshayah ספר ישעיה) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament, believed to be written by Isaiah[1]. // The 66 chapters of Isaiah consist primarily of prophecies of the judgments awaiting nations that are persecuting Judah. ...

Emblem of the Papacy
Emblem of the Papacy

Another famous part of the Papal regalia is the Fisherman's Ring, a gold ring decorated with a depiction of St. Peter in a boat casting his net, with the name of the reigning Pope around it. The Fisherman's Ring was first mentioned in a letter of Pope Clement IV to his nephew in 1265 wherein he mentions that Popes were accustomed to sealing public documents with leaden "bulls" attached, and private letters with "the seal of the Fisherman" (by the fifteenth century, the Fisherman's Ring was used to seal Papal briefs). The Fisherman's Ring is placed on the newly-elected Pope's finger by the Chamberlain of the Holy Roman Church; on the Pope's death, the Cardinal Chamberlain smashes the Fisherman's Ring with a hammer, symbolising the end of the late Pope's authority. Image File history File links Emblem_of_the_Papacy. ... Image File history File links Emblem_of_the_Papacy. ... The Ring of the Fisherman or Pescatorio is an official part of the regalia worn by the pope, described by the Roman Catholic Church (of which he is the head) as the successor of Saint Peter, a fisherman by trade. ... Clement IV, né Gui Faucoi le Gros ( Guy Foulques the Fat or Guido le Gros) (Saint-Gilles-du-Gard, November 23, year uncertain – Viterbo, November 29, 1268), was elected Pope February 5, 1265, in a conclave held at Perugia that took four months, while cardinals argued over whether to call... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... The Papal Brief is a formal document emanating from the Roman Catholic Pope, in a somewhat simpler and more modern form than a Papal Bull. ... The title Camerlengo (Italian for Chamberlain) refers to an official of the Papal court, referring either to the Chamberlain of the Roman Catholic Church, to the Chamberlain of the Sacred College of Cardinals, or to various lesser dignitaries. ...


The umbracullum (better known in the Italian form ombrellino) is a canopy or umbrella (consisting of alternating red and gold stripes) whose original function was quite simply to provide shade. As it was traditionally a royal prerogative to walk beneath a canopy, Pope Alexander VI began using the umbracullum to symbolise the temporal powers of the Papacy; it was formerly carried by a man standing behind the Pope, and features in the heraldic arms of the Cardinal Chamberlain (who governs the Church during a Sede Vacante, a Papal interregnum) and the former arms of the Papal States. The practice of walking with the umbracullum has been discontinued, although it continues to feature in heraldry and remains the insigne of a basilica, usually displayed to the right of the main altar. The umbracullum is a historic piece of the papal regalia and insignia, once used on a daily basis to provide shade for the pope. ... Pope Alexander VI (1 January 1431 – 18 August 1503), born Roderic Borja (Italian: Borgia), (reigned from 1492 to 1503), is the most controversial of the secular popes of the Renaissance and one whose surname became a byword for the debased standards of the papacy of that era. ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... St. ...

The Coronation of Pope Paul VI. Note the pallium and the fanon worn over his shoulders.
The Coronation of Pope Paul VI. Note the pallium and the fanon worn over his shoulders.

In heraldry, the Pope's arms are surmounted by the aforementioned two keys in saltire behind the escutcheon (one key silver and one key gold, tied with a red cord), and above them a silver triregnum with three gold crowns and red infulae, or the red strips of fabric hanging from the back over the shoulders when worn ("two keys in saltire or and argent, interlacing in the rings or, beneath a tiara argent, crowned or"). The flag most frequently associated with the Pope is the yellow and white flag of Vatican City, with the arms of the Holy See ("Gules, two keys in saltire or and argent, interlacing in the rings or, beneath a tiara argent, crowned or") on the right hand side in the white half of the flag. This flag was first adopted in 1808, during the reign of Pius VII, whereas the previous flag had been red and gold, the traditional colours of the Pontificate. Image File history File links Paulcrnd. ... Image File history File links Paulcrnd. ... now. ... Pope John Paul II wearing the fanon on his shoulders. ... 1808 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...

Emblem of the Papacy during sede vacante
Emblem of the Papacy during sede vacante

One of the most familiar (and now discontinued) trappings of the Papacy was the sedia gestatoria, a mobile throne or armchair carried by twelve footmen (palafrenieri) in red uniforms. Traditionally, the sedia gestatoria was used in certain solemn occasions of Pontifical ceremony, most especially the procession held shortly after the Pope's election from the Sistine Chapel to St. Peter's Basilica where the Pope held his coronation ceremony; the Pope was carried in great pomp and circumstance, accompanied by two attendants bearing large (and largely ceremonial) fans made of white ostrich-feathers (flabella). While being carried in the sedia gestatoria the Pope frequently wore a long cloak or mantle (called a cope) which flowed from his shoulders over the sides of the throne. The use of the sedia gestatoria and of the flabella was discontinued by Pope John Paul II, with the former being replaced by the so-called Popemobile. The ombrellino and keys, which is the insignia of the Holy See during sede vacante. ... The ombrellino and keys, which is the insignia of the Holy See during sede vacante. ... Sede vacante is the vacancy of the episcopal see of a particular church in the Canon law of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Sistine Chapel (Italian: Cappella Sistina) is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the Pope, in the Vatican City. ... This article is about the famous building in Rome. ... A flabellum (plural flabella), in liturgical use, is a fan made of leather, silk, parchment or feathers, intended to keep away insects from the Sacred Species and from the priest. ... a priest wearing a cope The cope is a liturgical vestment, which may be of any liturgical colour, and is like a very long mantle or cloak, fastened at the breast by a clasp. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), (Italian: Giovanni Paolo II), born   (May 18, 1920, Wadowice, Poland – April 2, 2005, Vatican City) reigned as Pope of the Roman... Pope John Paul II on a popemobile Another popemobile, produced by Fiat Popemobile is an informal name for the specially designed motor vehicle used by the Pope during public appearances. ...

Related article

Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Lutheran and Anglican Churches. ...

External links

  • Dappled Photos has a collection of popes donning rarely used vestments

  Results from FactBites:
 
Papal regalia and insignia at AllExperts (883 words)
Since the 13th Century many papal portraits have shown the pontiff wearing the camauro, a red velvet cap trimmed with ermine.
Another famous part of the Papal regalia is the Fisherman's Ring, a gold ring decorated with a depiction of St. Peter in a boat casting his net, with the name of the reigning Pope around it.
The Fisherman's Ring is placed on the newly-elected Pope's finger by the Chamberlain of the Holy Roman Church; on the Pope's death, the Cardinal Chamberlain smashes the Fisherman's Ring with a hammer, symbolising the end of the late Pope's authority.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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