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Encyclopedia > Papal inauguration
Pope Paul VI (1963-1978) is crowned at the last papal coronation to date, in 1963.
Pope Paul VI (1963-1978) is crowned at the last papal coronation to date, in 1963.

The Papal Inauguration Mass is a liturgical service of the Catholic Church (officiated with elements of both the Latin Rite and Eastern Rite) for the ecclesiastical investiture of the Pope. It replaced the millennium-old Papal Coronation after coronations fell out of favour as a form of papal inauguration after the Second Vatican Council. image of papal coronation - widely copied no sign of copyright File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... image of papal coronation - widely copied no sign of copyright File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... From the Greek word λειτουργια, which can be transliterated as leitourgia, meaning the work of the people, a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may refer to, or include, an elaborate formal ritual (such as the Catholic Mass), a daily activity such... The Roman Catholic Church believes its founding was based on Jesus appointment of Saint Peter as the primary church leader, later Bishop of Rome. ... Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article (The Latin Rite), is a term by which documents of the Catholic Church designate the particular Church, distinct from the Eastern Rite Churches, that developed in western Europe and northern Africa, where Latin was the language of... The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ... The Pope (from Greek: pappas, father; from Latin: papa, Papa, father) is the successor of St. ... A millennium is a period of time, literally equal to one thousand years (from Latin mille, thousand, and annum, year). ... Pope Pius XII, in coronation robes and wearing the 1877 Papal Tiara, is carried through St. ... A coronation is a ceremony marking the investment of a monarch with regal power through, amongst other symbolic acts, the placement of a crown upon his or her head. ... The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, or Vatican II, was an Ecumenical Council of the Catholic Church opened under Pope John XXIII in 1962 and closed under Pope Paul VI in 1965. ...


Pope Paul VI, the last Pope to be crowned or use a Papal Tiara, abandoned the usage of the tiara in a ceremony at the end of the Council, and gave his personal tiara to the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in the City of Washington as a gift to the Catholics of the United States. However more than 20 other tiaras remain in the Vatican for possible future use. (One is still used to symbolically crown a statue of Saint Peter on his saint's day every year.) The first pope to receive an inauguration instead of coronation was Pope John Paul I. Pope Paul VI (Latin: ), born Giovanni Battista Enrico Antonio Maria Montini (September 26, 1897 – August 6, 1978), reigned as Pope and as sovereign of Vatican City from 1963 to 1978. ... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, in Latin as the Triregnum, or in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown of Byzantine and Persian origin that is the symbol of the papacy. ... Image:Basilicaofthenationalshrine. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Saint Peter, also known as Peter, Simon ben Jonah/BarJonah, Simon Peter, Cephas and Kepha—original name Simon or Simeon (Acts 15:14)—was one of the twelve original disciples or apostles of Jesus. ... Pope John Paul I (in Latin ), born Albino Luciani (October 17, 1912 – September 28, 1978), reigned as pope and as sovereign of Vatican City from August 26, 1978 to September 28, 1978. ...

Pope John Paul I at the first papal inauguration, in September 1978. He is seen with Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, the future Pope Benedict XVI
Pope John Paul I at the first papal inauguration, in September 1978. He is seen with Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, the future Pope Benedict XVI

Contents

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Pope Benedict XVI (Latin: , Italian: Benedetto XVI), born Joseph Alois Ratzinger (April 16, 1927 in Marktl am Inn, Bavaria, Germany), is the 265th and reigning pope, the head of the Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City State. ...


The Replacement of the Coronation

He may have decided not to wear his own personal tiara, but Paul VI's 1975 Apostolic Constitution explicitly required that his successor be crowned. Following the election of Pope John Paul I in the August 1978 conclave, initial media reports spoke of a standard papal coronation taking place. However the new pope , in the face of considerable Vatican opposition, wanted the ceremony replaced. He was supported by Virgilius Noe, the Papal Master of Ceremonies, and one of the most controversial innovators of new liturgy after Vatican II. (In the early 2000s, when Pope John Paul II decided to allow Tridentine Masses to be celebrated more frequently, including in St. Peter's Basilica - he also celebrated them himself in his private chapel - the then Cardinal Noe managed successfully to stop Tridentine Masses from being allowed on the main High Altar.) Noe designed the new inauguration Mass along ideas suggested by the new pope, who had requested a low key ceremony. Pope John Paul I (in Latin ), born Albino Luciani (October 17, 1912 – September 28, 1978), reigned as pope and as sovereign of Vatican City from August 26, 1978 to September 28, 1978. ... Following the death of Paul VI on August 6, 1978, the first conclave of the year was held on August 25–26 in Vatican City. ... A pre-Vatican II altar with reredosThe altar is preceded by three steps, as was most common for a churchs main altar, though some main altars, such as that in Saint Peters in the Vatican, had (and have) much more than three. ...


His successor, Pope John Paul II, to some extent obliged by the atmosphere of mourning after John Paul I's sudden death, followed suit, maintaining the changes made by his predecessor, though with some ritualistic additions, some of which echoed the former coronations. He requested his mass of Inauguration to be celebrated in the morning rather than in the evening like that of John Paul I, so as not to disrupt coverage of a Italian football match on RAI in the afternoon. In his inauguration homily however he spoke of October 1978, so soon after the sudden death, as being "not the time" to return to the coronation, while dismissing the principal justification given for abandoning both the coronation and the Papal Tiara, the suggestion that their use suggested a claim by popes to temporal jurisdiction. Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef Wojtyła (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005) reigned as pope of the Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his death, making his the second-longest pontificate (or the third-longest, as enumerated by Roman Catholic... Football is the name given to a number of different team sports. ... Rai may refer to: RAI, Radio Audizioni Italiane Rai is the word for paradise in Slavic languages Rai, an ethnolinguistic group of Nepal Raï, a form of folk music, originated in Oran, Algeria, from Bedouin shepherds Raí, Brazilian football (soccer) player Rai, a book by Kensaku Shimaki Rai, one of... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, in Latin as the Triregnum, or in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown of Byzantine and Persian origin that is the symbol of the papacy. ... 1834 Tiara of Pope Gregory XVI - Pope John Paul II dismissed claims that the tiara reflected a claim for temporal jurisdiction Temporal jusdiction is a term used within Roman Catholicism to refer to past claims by popes to rule a territory as well as rule the Church. ...


In his 1996 Apostolic Constitution, John Paul II required that some "solemn ceremony of the inauguration of a pontificate" take place, but did not specify whether than ceremony inaugurating (ie, symbolically marking the beginning of) a pontificate should be a full Papal Inauguration or a traditional Papal Coronation. He left it open to each pope to decide which rite of inauguration they wished to use.


The Inauguration

The modern Papal Inauguration, based through not exactly modelled on the form used for John Paul I, takes place during Mass (usually in the piazza outside Saint Peter's Basilica) and involves the formal bestowal of the pallium, the symbol of the pope's universal jurisdiction, on the newly elected pope by the senior Cardinal Deacon. Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger (now Pope Benedict XVI) presiding at the 2005 Easter Vigil Mass in place of Pope John Paul II. Mass is the term used of the celebration of the Eucharist in the Latin rites of the Roman Catholic Church and the Anglican Church. ... Interior view, with the nave of the Cattedra in the back St. ... A Pallium The Pallium or Pall (derived, so far as the name is concerned, from the Roman pallium or palla, a woollen cloak) is an ecclesiastical vestment in the Roman Catholic Church, originally peculiar to the Pope, but for many centuries past bestowed by him on metropolitans and primates as... The Cardinal Deacons are the lowest-ranked of the three orders of Cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Three popes have used the inauguration ceremony: Pope John Paul I, Pope John Paul II, (both in 1978) and Pope Benedict XVI (2005). Pope John Paul I (in Latin ), born Albino Luciani (October 17, 1912 – September 28, 1978), reigned as pope and as sovereign of Vatican City from August 26, 1978 to September 28, 1978. ... Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef Wojtyła (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005) reigned as pope of the Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his death, making his the second-longest pontificate (or the third-longest, as enumerated by Roman Catholic... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... Pope Benedict XVI (Latin: , Italian: Benedetto XVI), born Joseph Alois Ratzinger (April 16, 1927 in Marktl am Inn, Bavaria, Germany), is the 265th and reigning pope, the head of the Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City State. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Pope John Paul II at the second ever inauguration, in 1978. Around his neck he wears the Pallium, and he also wears the miter which replaced the papal tiara.
Enlarge
Pope John Paul II at the second ever inauguration, in 1978. Around his neck he wears the Pallium, and he also wears the miter which replaced the papal tiara.

Pope Benedict XVI maintained those changes and introduced yet another one: the oath of obedience, which the cardinals would have made one at a time during the Mass, was anticipated and only a symbolic oath was made during the ceremony, as it is explained below. widely used standard image of John Paul II - used in thousands of publications - free use no c/r File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... widely used standard image of John Paul II - used in thousands of publications - free use no c/r File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about the ceremonial head-dress; see also mitre (disambiguation). ...


The modern ceremony does not include a Papal Oath, allegedly always sworn by popes before John Paul I. Conservatives criticised its absence, with some sedevacantist groups refusing to accept the legitimacy of the modern popes due to the absence of both the oath and the symbolic tiara. The Papal Oath, also known as the oath against modernism, was an oath traditionally sworn by the popes of the Catholic Church during their Papal Coronation. ... Sede vacante Coat of Arms, used when there is no reigning pope. ...


Inauguration of Benedict XVI

Pope Benedict XVI was formally inaugurated as Supreme Pontiff on April 24, 2005. The day after his election, Benedict approved new procedures for the inauguration. The ceremony began with Benedict and the Cardinals kneeling at the tomb of Saint Peter — considered the first Pope — to give him homage. Benedict said, "I leave from where the Apostle arrived." The Pope and the Cardinals then processed out to Saint Peter's Square for the Inauguration Mass. Pope Benedict XVI (Latin: , Italian: Benedetto XVI), born Joseph Alois Ratzinger (April 16, 1927 in Marktl am Inn, Bavaria, Germany), is the 265th and reigning pope, the head of the Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City State. ... April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (115th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint Peter, also known as Peter, Simon ben Jonah/BarJonah, Simon Peter, Cephas and Kepha—original name Simon or Simeon (Acts 15:14)—was one of the twelve original disciples or apostles of Jesus. ...


Receiving the Pallium

The Holy Father then received the pallium and the Ring of the Fisherman. His pallium is 2.6 yards (2.4 metres) long, and is made of wool with black silk tips. Instead of six black crosses that other Bishop's palliums have, Benedict's pallium has five embroidered red silk crosses. There are three pins in three of the crosses to symbolize the three nails driven into Christ at His Crucifixion. A Pallium The Pallium or Pall (derived, so far as the name is concerned, from the Roman pallium or palla, a woollen cloak) is an ecclesiastical vestment in the Roman Catholic Church, originally peculiar to the Pope, but for many centuries past bestowed by him on metropolitans and primates as... The Ring of the Fisherman or Pescatorio is an official part of the regalia worn by the pope, described by the Roman Catholic Church (of which he is the head) as the successor of Saint Peter, a fisherman by trade. ... Wool in a shearing shed Long and short hair wool at the South Central Family Farm Research Center in Boonesville, AR Wool sheep, Royal Melbourne Show Wool is the fibre derived from the hair of animals of the Caprinae family, principally sheep and goats, but the hair of other mammals... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Crucifixion is an ancient method of execution, where the victim was tied or nailed to a large wooden cross (Latin: crux) and left to hang there until dead. ...


Benedict's pallium is different to that of his predecessor, he reverted to an earlier form of the pallium practically identical to the ancient omophorion. It is wider than the standard pallium although not as wide as the modern omophorion. In the Orthodox liturgical tradition, the omophorion is one of the bishops vestments and the symbol of his spiritual and ecclesiastical authority. ...


Swearing obedience to the pope

Pope Benedict XVI at his Inauguration in 2005. In a new development, Benedict was presented with his Papal Ring (shown on his right hand) during the ceremony.
Pope Benedict XVI at his Inauguration in 2005. In a new development, Benedict was presented with his Papal Ring (shown on his right hand) during the ceremony.

Not all the Cardinals knelt before Benedict to swear loyalty to him, since they already did so right after his election. Instead, a group of twelve serving different roles in the church knelt before Benedict to swear obedience: the senior Cardinal Bishop, the senior Cardinal Priest, the senior Cardinal Deacon, the bishop of Benedict's former suburbicarian diocese of Velletri-Segni, the priest serving as pastor of Benedict's former titular church when he was a Cardinal Priest, a deacon, a religious brother, a Benedictine nun, a married couple from Korea, and a young woman from Sri Lanka and young man from the Democratic Republic of the Congo who had been recently confirmed. LObseratore Romano picture of Pope Benedict XVI at his Inauguration Mass issued to the media. ... LObseratore Romano picture of Pope Benedict XVI at his Inauguration Mass issued to the media. ... The Ring of the Fisherman or Pescatorio is an official part of the regalia worn by the pope, described by the Roman Catholic Church (of which he is the head) as the successor of Saint Peter, a fisherman by trade. ... A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official in the Roman Catholic Church, ranking just below the Pope and appointed by him as a member of the College of Cardinals during a consistory. ... Cardinal Bishops, or Cardinals of the Episcopal Order, are among the most important persons in the Roman Catholic Church. ... Cardinal Priests are the most numerous of the three orders of Cardinals in the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Cardinal Deacons are the lowest-ranked of the three orders of Cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... The seven suburbicarian dioceses are Roman Catholic dioceses located in the suburbs that surround Rome. ... Roman Catholic priest LCDR Allen R. Kuss (USN) aboard USS Enterprise A priest or priestess is a holy man or woman who takes an officiating role in worship of any religion, with the distinguishing characteristic of offering sacrifices. ... Deacon is a role in the Christian Church which is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. ... Look up Brother in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Brother may have the following meanings, in addition to and derived from its main one of male sibling; see Family. a male friend or acquaintance, in some cultures shortened to Bro or Brah a peer, male or female (though such usage is... In general, a nun is a female ascetic who chooses to voluntarily leave mainstream society and live her life in prayer and contemplation in a monastery or convent. ... Korea is a country divided into two independent nations, South Korea and North Korea, whose people share history, language, and ethnicity. ... Confirmation can refer to: Confirmation (sacrament) Confirmation (epistemology) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


New Vatican dress code

One change was made to the previous dresscode followed for inaugurations. While in the past diplomatic attendees, including heads of state and government as well as ambassadors, were required to wear evening dress (white tie and tails, and silk top hat), matching the usual dress codes for formal Vatican ceremonies, Benedict XVI allowed visiting dignitaries to wear lounge suits. Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II with Commonwealth Prime Ministers, in the 1950s. ... A suit, also known as a business suit, comprises a collection of matching clothing consisting of: a coat (commonly known as a jacket) a waistcoat (optional) (USA vest) a pair of trousers (USA pants) Though not part of a suit, a shirt and tie very frequently accompany it. ...


After the ceremony

After Mass, Benedict greeted various delegations present for his Inauguration. In the days following his inauguration he visited the other major basilicas of Rome. The day after his inauguration at St. Peters, he paid homage to the other founder of the church of Rome by visiting St. Paul Outside the Walls. Then on May 7 he celebrated his enthronement Mass at St. John Lateran—his cathedral church. Later that evening Benedict visited the Salus Populi Romani icon of Mary in the Basilica of St. Mary Major. Statue in front of the Basilica Basilica di San Paolo fuori le Mura — also known in English as the Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls — is one of five churches considered to be the great ancient basilicas of Rome, Italy. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... Pope John Paul I s enthronement as Pope on 3rd September 1978. ... Late Baroque façade of the Basilica, completed, after a competition for the design, by Alessandro Galilei in 1735 St. ... A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy (such as the Roman Catholic Church or the Lutheran or Anglican churches), which serves as the central church of a diocese. ... Saint Mary Major, in Italian, Santa Maria Maggiore, is one of the five great ancient basilicas of Rome, Italy. ...


The future of the Inauguration Ceremony

More conservative members of the Roman Catholic Church have openly requested the return of the tradition of crowning popes. Traditional Catholics, whether sedevacantist or not, consider the absence of the Coronation and Oath to be particularly wrong. Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ... Traditional Catholic is a broad term used to describe many groups of Roman Catholics who follow more traditional aspects of the Catholic Faith. ...


Pope John Paul's 1996 Apostolic Constitution leaves it open to future popes to choose, if they wish, to return to the rite of Papal Coronation. But with the current emphasis on making the Church a simpler and less regal institution, it remains to be seen if any future Popes would use the Papal Coronation ceremony, whether they will be crowned in a new style papal coronation modelled on the Inauguration Mass, or whether the tiara-less Inauguration Mass, as celebrated twice in 1978 and again in 2005 is here to stay. Pope Pius XII, in coronation robes and wearing the 1877 Papal Tiara, is carried through St. ...


It is worth noting that, while the ritual of inauguration used for the installation of Popes John Paul I and John Paul II was a provisional, ad hoc, rite, the one used for Pope Benedict XVI was not. That is due to the fact that the Office of Liturgical Celebrations of the Supreme Pontiff had prepared, under Pope John Paul II, a draft version of a permanent rite, with a view to it being submitted for revision and eventual approval as a definitive ordo by John Paul II´s successor. Pope Benedict gave his approval to this new rite on April 20th, 2005, and accordinly it was published as an official liturgical book of the Church, with the name Ordo Rituum Pro Ministerii Petrini Initio Romae Episcopi (Order of the Rite for the Inauguration of the Petrine Ministry of the Bishop of Rome). This new ordo is intended to be a permanent version of the rite of inauguration, and its promulgation was described by the Papal Master of Ceremonies, Bishop Pietro Marini, in a press conference he granted days before Pope Benedict´s inauguration, as part of the liturgical reforms that followed the Second Vatican Council, now applied to strictly papal rites. Of course Popes can decree changes to liturgical rites previously approved, so that, should a future Pope decide to reinstate the Coronation ceremony, it would only require a change in the ordo approved by Pope Benedict XVI.


The Ordo Rituum Pro Ministerii Petrini Initio Romae Episcopi approved in 2005 contains not only the rite of the Inauguration Mass proper, but also the ritual that is to be followed for the traditional Mass of inthronization of the new Pope in the Catherdra Romana of the Lateran Basilica, that is considered Rome´s cathedral and the world´s first Basilica, even ranking above the Vatican Basilica. Popes usually take possession of the Lateran Basilica within a few days of the inauguration or coronation ceremony. Pope Benedict XVI took possession of the Lateran Basilica, and was enthroned therein, on May 7th, 2005. This rite, known as incathedratio, is the last ceremony marking the accession of a new Supreme Pontiff.

Papal Tiara series Triregno

Coronation | Inauguration | Papal Tiara | Decoration of the Papal Tiara | List of Tiaras | Origins of the Papal Tiara | Vicarius Filii Dei Download high resolution version (800x1294, 286 KB) This work is copyrighted. ... Pope Pius XII, in coronation robes and wearing the 1877 Papal Tiara, is carried through St. ... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, in Latin as the Triregnum, or in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown of Byzantine and Persian origin that is the symbol of the papacy. ... 16th century Papal Tiara, the oldest surviving tiara in the papal collection. ... Pope John XXIII moments after his coronation in 1958. ... The coronation of Pope Pius XII in 1939. ... Vicarius Filii Dei, Representative of the Son of God in Latin, is a phrase used in the forged Donation of Constantine referring to Saint Peter. ...

Papal rituals, symbols & ceremonial Vatican City: Coat of Arms

Apostolic Palace | Papal ceremonial | Papal Coat of Arms | Conclave | Coronation | Holy See | Inauguration | Papal Oath | Papal Ring | Papal Fanon | Papal Camauro | Mitre | Mozzetta | Sedia Gestoria | Sistine Chapel | Basilica of St. John Lateran | Pallium | St. Peter's Basilica | St. Peter's Square | Papal Tiara | Vatican City
Vatican coat of arms This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... View across St. ... Every pope of the Roman Catholic Church has his own personal coat of arms that serves as a symbol of his papacy. ... The Sistine Chapel is the location of the conclave. ... Pope Pius XII, in coronation robes and wearing the 1877 Papal Tiara, is carried through St. ... The Papal Oath, also known as the oath against modernism, was an oath traditionally sworn by the popes of the Catholic Church during their Papal Coronation. ... The Ring of the Fisherman or Pescatorio is an official part of the regalia worn by the pope, described by the Roman Catholic Church (of which he is the head) as the successor of Saint Peter, a fisherman by trade. ... Pope John Paul II wearing the fanon on his shoulders. ... Pope Benedict XVI wore the camauro for his general audience on 21 December 2005. ... MITRE is a US not-for-profit corporation that manages three federally-funded research and development centers whose main activities are applying computer-based automation to large and complex tasks. ... Look up Mozzetta in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Mozzetta The mozetta is a short cape that covers the shoulders and can be buttoned over the breast, and to which a hood is attached, worn by the Pope and by cardinals, bishops, abbots, and other Roman Catholic dignitaries. ... Pope John Paul I being carried on the Sedia Gestatoria The sedia gestatoria is the portable throne on which Popes are sometimes carried. ... The Sistine Chapel (Italian: Cappella Sistina) is a chapel in the Palace of the Vatican, the official residence of the Roman Catholic Pope in the Vatican City. ... The late Baroque façade of the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano was completed by Alessandro Galilei in 1735 after winning a competition for the design. ... A Pallium The Pallium or Pall (derived, so far as the name is concerned, from the Roman pallium or palla, a woollen cloak) is an ecclesiastical vestment in the Roman Catholic Church, originally peculiar to the Pope, but for many centuries past bestowed by him on metropolitans and primates as... The Basilica of Saint Peter from Castel SantAngelo. ... Saint Peters Square and Basilica, 1909. ... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, in Latin as the Triregnum, or in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown of Byzantine and Persian origin that is the symbol of the papacy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Papal Tiara at AllExperts (3984 words)
The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, or in Latin as the 'Triregnum', and in Italian as the 'Triregno', is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown, supposedly of Byzantine and Persian origin, that is a symbol of the Roman Catholic papacy.
As with all previous popes, Pope Paul VI was crowned with a tiara at the papal coronation.
Conversely, the papal coronation ceremony, in which the Pope was fanned with the flabella of ostrich feathers and carried in a sedia gestatoria (portable throne), was based on ceremonies witnessed in Constantinople in the Middle Ages.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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