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Encyclopedia > Papal conclave, 2005
Papal conclave, April 2005
Coat of Arms during the Vacancy of the Holy See
Dates April 18April 19, 2005
Location Sistine Chapel, Apostolic Palace, Vatican City
Dean Joseph Ratzinger
Vice Dean Angelo Sodano
Camerlengo Eduardo Martínez Somalo
Protodeacon Jorge Medina Estévez
Secretary Francesco Monterisi
Ballots Pope elected after 4 ballots
Elected Pope Joseph Ratzinger
(took name Benedict XVI)

The Papal conclave of 2005 was convened due to the death of Pope John Paul II on April 2, 2005. After his death, the cardinals who were in Rome met and set a date for the beginning of the conclave to elect John Paul's successor. The conclave began on April 18, 2005 and ended on the following day after four ballots. Eligible members of the College of Cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church (those who were less than 80 years of age at the time of the death of Pope John Paul II) met and elected Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger as the new Pope. After accepting his election, he took the regnal name Pope Benedict XVI. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sistine Chapel (Italian: ) is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the Pope, in the Vatican City. ... View across St. ... This article is becoming very long. ... The two Secretaries of State: Cardinal Sodano (Secretary of State of the Holy See) with Condoleezza Rice (Secretary of State of the USA). ... His Eminence Eduardo Cardinal Martínez Somalo JCD (born March 31, 1927) is a Spanish prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Cardinal Medina Estévez announcing the election of Pope Benedict XVI Jorge Arturo Agustín Medina Estévez (born December 23, 1926 in Santiago, Chile) is a Chilean Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Francesco Monterisi (born May 28, 1934) is an Italian prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The coat of arms of a Cardinal are indicated by a red galero (wide-brimmed hat) with 15 tassels on each side (the motto and escutcheon are proper to the individual Cardinal). ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... con·clave (knklv, kng-) n. ... For the town in France, see Ballots, Mayenne. ... The Sacred College of Cardinals is the body of all Cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church established by Pope St. ... “Catholic Church” redirects here. ... A regnal name, or reign name, is a formal name used by some popes and monarchs during their reigns. ... This article is becoming very long. ...


Proceedings on April 18 consisted of a morning Mass for the Election of the Roman Pontiff (Latin Pro Eligendo Romano Pontifice). In the afternoon the Cardinal electors assembled in the Hall of Blessings in St Peter's Basilica and from there went in solemn procession to the Sistine Chapel, where, after the singing of the hymn Veni Creator Spiritus, each Cardinal took the prescribed oath. After these and other formalities for the start of the Conclave had been observed, Archbishop Piero Marini, Papal Master of Ceremonies, gave the traditional command extra omnes (everybody out). The doors were then locked, and the actual Conclave began. In accordance with the law, one round of balloting was held on that evening. Thereafter balloting was to continue until a new Pope was elected, on a schedule of two ballots each morning and two each afternoon. The ballot slips were to be burned at noon and 7 p.m. Rome time (10:00 and 17:00 UTC) each day. The traditional procedure is that smoke from this, in times past reinforced by adding handfuls of dry or damp straw, emerged from a temporary chimney on the chapel roof as for a conclusive vote (white smoke) or an as yet undecided one (black smoke). Nowadays the straw is replaced by chemically-produced smoke. is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A Medieval Low Mass by a bishop. ... Pontiff is a title of certain religious leaders, now used principally to refer to the Mercinary of the New Church. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... An elector can be: In the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation, the collegiate of seven Electors (eight since 1648) (Kurfürsten) consisted of those lay or clerical princes who had the right to vote in the election of the king or Holy Roman Emperor; see prince-elector. ... Interior view, with the nave of the Cattedra in the back St. ... A procession (via Middle English processioun, French procession, derived from Latin, processio, itself from procedere, to go forth, advance, proceed) is, in general, an organized body of people advancing in a formal or ceremonial manner. ... The Sistine Chapel (Italian: ) is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the Pope, in the Vatican City. ... Veni Creator Spiritus is a hymn normally sung in Gregorian Chant and is considered the most famous of hymns. ... Piero Marini (born 13 Jan 1942) is a Roman Catholic archbishop, currently serving as the Master of Pontifical Liturgical Celebrations. ... For the town in France, see Ballots, Mayenne. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) is a high-precision atomic time standard. ...


The first ballot, on the evening of April 18, produced black smoke from the chimney of the Sistine Chapel, meaning no pope had been elected. More black smoke followed the two morning ballots of April 19. White smoke emerged in the afternoon but the fact that initially the bells of St. Peter's Basilica did not ring left some uncertainty as to what this meant. Shortly after 6 p.m. Rome time, they did begin pealing, thus confirming that a new pope had been elected. is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up Chimney in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Church bell from Saleby, Västergötland, Sweden containing an inscription from 1228 in the Runic alphabet A church bell is a bell which is rung in a (especially Christian) church either to signify the hour or the time for worshippers to go to church, perhaps to attend a wedding...

Contents

Papal election process for 2005

Main article: Papal election
Due to the large number of Cardinal electors, and breaking with the traditional use of a chalice, the ballots were collected this time in an urn featuring a sculpted image of the Good Shepherd.

Presiding over the conclave was the Dean of the College of Cardinals, Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger. Given that Ratzinger himself was chosen as Pope, the duty of asking if he would accept the election and what name would he take fell, in accordance with the law, to the vice-dean, Cardinal Angelo Sodano. The Sistine Chapel is the location of the conclave. ... Image File history File links Papalconclaveurn. ... Image File history File links Papalconclaveurn. ... The Dean of the Sacred College of Cardinals is the president of the College of Cardinals in the Roman Catholic Church, and as such always holds the rank of Cardinal Bishop. ... The two Secretaries of State: Cardinal Sodano (Secretary of State of the Holy See) with Condoleezza Rice (Secretary of State of the USA). ...


It fell to the Cardinal Protodeacon, Jorge Medina Estévez, to make the solemn announcement of the election of Cardinal Ratzinger as Pope Benedict XVI. Cardinal Medina Estévez announcing the election of Pope Benedict XVI Jorge Arturo Agustín Medina Estévez (born December 23, 1926 in Santiago, Chile) is a Chilean Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


This was the first Papal election governed under provisions made by John Paul II in his Apostolic Constitution Universi Dominici Gregis, promulgated on February 22, 1996. According to tradition and declaration of the Camerlengo, Eduardo Martínez Somalo, Benedict XVI is the 265th Bishop of Rome, head of both the Latin Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. The Sistine Chapel is the location of the conclave. ... Universi Dominici Gregis is an Apostolic Constitution of the Roman Catholic Church issued by Pope John Paul II on February 22, 1996. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Coat of arms of the Cardinal Camerlengo of the Holy Roman Church (the escutcheon and motto are proper to the incumbent) The title Camerlengo of the Holy Roman Church (plu camerlenghi, Italian for Chamberlain) refers to an official of the Papal court---either the Chamberlain of the Roman Church, the... His Eminence Eduardo Cardinal Martínez Somalo JCD (born March 31, 1927) is a Spanish prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Eastern Catholic Churches are autonomous particular Churches in full communion with the Pope of Rome. ...


In a break with recent tradition, Universi Dominici Gregis provided that the cardinals were not to be locked under key in the Sistine Chapel precincts throughout the conclave. Instead they were to be lodged within the confines of the Vatican City State at the Domus Sanctae Marthae when not in session, where they did not have access to newspapers, television, radio, the Internet, or telephones for the duration of the election process. The Domus Sanctæ Marthæ (Latin for Saint Marthas House) is a building adjacent to Saint Peters Basilica in the Vatican City built during the reign of Pope John Paul II. It functions as a guest house for those having business with the Holy See, but it is best...


On April 24, 5 days after Benedict XVI's election, he was ceremonially installed. Since Pope John Paul I, the historical Papal Coronation has been replaced by a simple investiture with the pallium and Papal Inauguration Mass. Many dignitaries of various countries, some of whom had attended the funeral of Pope John Paul II, also attended this function. One of them was the then German Chancellor Gerhard Schröder. is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Pope John Paul I (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo I), born Albino Luciani, (October 17, 1912—September 28, 1978) reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and as Sovereign of Vatican City from August 26, 1978 until his death. ... Pope Pius XII, wearing the 1877 Papal Tiara, is carried through St. ... now. ... Pope Paul VI (1963-1978) is crowned at the last papal coronation to date, in 1963. ... The body of Pope John Paul II. April 5, 2005 The funeral of Pope John Paul II was held on April 8, 2005, six days after his death on April 2. ...   [] (born April 7, 1944), German politician, was Chancellor of Germany from 1998 to 2005. ...


The cardinal electors

For a full list, see cardinal electors in Papal conclave, 2005. For a list of those deemed likely to be elected see List of papabili in the 2005 papal conclave.
Papal Conclave of 2005
Electors 117 total
Absent 2
(Jaime Sin, Adolfo Antonio Suárez Rivera)
Present 115
Africa 11
Asia & Middle East 11
Europe 58
Oceania 2
North America 22
South America 13
DECEASED POPE John Paul II (Karol Wojtyła)
NEW POPE Benedict XVI (Joseph Ratzinger)

Although there were 183 cardinals in all, cardinals over the age of 80 at the time the papacy fell vacant were ineligible to vote in the conclave according to rules enacted by Pope Paul VI in 1971 and modified slightly in 1996 by John Paul II. Pope Paul also limited the number of cardinal electors to a maximum of 120, though John Paul sometimes disregarded this limit when elevating cardinals. At the time of John Paul's death, there were 117 cardinals under the age of 80 and therefore eligible to vote in the conclave. The late pope appointed another cardinal secretly (in pectore) in 2003, but his identity was never made public; since John Paul did not reveal the name of this cardinal before he died, the in pectore cardinalate expired on April 2. The following were the cardinal electors in the 2005 papal conclave. ... A number of men had been named as potential successors (papabili) to Pope John Paul II, who died on April 2, 2005, before the 2005 conclave. ... Jaime Cardinal Sin, Archbishop of Manila, Philippines (1974-2003) Jaime Cardinal Sin, also Jaime Lachica Sin (born August 31, 1928), is a priest of the Roman Catholic Church in the Philippines. ... Adolfo Antonio Cardinal Suárez Rivera (born 9 January 1927) is a Cardinal Priest in the Roman Catholic Church and currently holds the rank of Archbishop Emeritus of the Archdiocese of Monterrey. ... The Papal conclave of 2005 was convened due to the death of Pope John Paul II on April 2, 2005. ... The Papal conclave of 2005 was convened due to the death of Pope John Paul II on April 2, 2005. ... The Papal conclave of 2005 was convened due to the death of Pope John Paul II on April 2, 2005. ... The Papal conclave of 2005 was convened due to the death of Pope John Paul II on April 2, 2005. ... The Papal conclave of 2005 was convened due to the death of Pope John Paul II on April 2, 2005. ... The Papal conclave of 2005 was convened due to the death of Pope John Paul II on April 2, 2005. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... This article is becoming very long. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... In pectore (Latin for in the breast/heart) is a term used in the Roman Catholic Church to refer to the power of the pope to name secret cardinals whose names are not revealed and whose identities are therefore known only to the pope and to God. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


All the electors save Jaime Sin, William Wakefield Baum and Joseph Ratzinger were appointed by Pope John Paul II. The result of this (with Cardinal Sin unable to attend) was that Cardinals Baum and Ratzinger were the only cardinals in the conclave with practical experience in the papal election process, having participated in the conclaves electing John Paul I and John Paul II. This state of affairs is not unparalleled in modern conclaves: the 1903 conclave had only one elector with previous experience in electing a pope, and the 1823 conclave only two. Jaime Cardinal Sin, Archbishop of Manila, Philippines (1974-2003) Jaime Cardinal Sin, also Jaime Lachica Sin (born August 31, 1928), is a priest of the Roman Catholic Church in the Philippines. ... William Wakefield Cardinal Baum (born November 21, 1926 in Dallas, Texas) is the senior living Roman Catholic Cardinal from the United States and was the senior Cardinal Priest to participate in the 2005 Papal conclave. ... The Papal conclave of 1903 was caused by the death of the 93 year old Pope Leo XIII, who at that stage was the third longest reigning pope in history. ... The 1823 Papal conclave led to the election of Pope Leo XII. Categories: Catholic-related stubs ...


The cardinal electors came from slightly over fifty nations (up slightly from the 49 represented in 1978) around the world, about 30 of which have only a single representative. The Italian electors were the most numerous at 20, followed by the contingent from the United States of America with 11. It was officially announced on April 9 that two of the 117 cardinal electors, Jaime Sin of the Philippines and Adolfo Antonio Suárez Rivera of Mexico, would not be attending the conclave due to poor health, though some reports had said Cardinal Sin had hoped for medical clearance to travel. Sin was to die in June. Even two short of the full number, with 115 cardinals attending, this conclave saw the largest number of cardinals ever to elect a pope; both conclaves in 1978 had 111 electors present. The supporting votes of two-thirds of the cardinals attending a conclave are needed to elect a new pope in the initial phases of the process: in this case, 77 votes. is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... His Eminence Adolfo Antonio Cardinal Suárez Rivera (born 9 January 1927) is a Cardinal Priest in the Roman Catholic Church and currently holds the rank of Archbishop Emeritus of Monterrey in that Church. ...


Course of balloting

Pre-balloting activities

Workers prepare the Sistine Chapel on April 15, 2005 for the opening of the papal conclave.

On Saturday, April 9, in Rome, 130 cardinals meeting in the "General Congregation" (including some non-voting cardinals) voted not to talk to the press until after the conclave. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The cardinal electors listened to two exhortations to the conclave cardinals before passing on to the first election on the afternoon of April 18. The first of these exhortations on the state of the Church was delivered on the morning of Thursday, April 14, in one of the daily general congregations. The preacher was Raniero Cantalamessa, a Capuchin friar and scholar in Church history, who has for several years preached the lenten sermons to the pope and his curial staff. The text of Cantalamessa's lecture was apparently leaked to the Italian press, who quoted him as having told the cardinals they "must guard against transforming Pentecost into a Babel, as happens when one looks for personal affirmation … They ought to only search for the glory of God and the realisation of his reign." The second exhortation was delivered by Tomáš Špidlík in the Sistine Chapel after the extra omnes on the afternoon of Monday, April 18, and the closing off of the conclave area to outsiders. is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... Reverend Father Raniero Cantalamessa is a Franciscan Capuchin Priest within the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Order of Friars Minor Capuchin (OFM Cap) is an order of friars in the Roman Catholic Church, the chief and only permanent offshoot of the Franciscans. ... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... His Eminence Tomáš Cardinal Å pidlík, SJ (born December 17, 1919 in Boskovice - then Czechoslovakia, now Czech Republic) was made a Cardinal by Pope John Paul II in 2003. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


First day

On 18 April, after concelebrated Mass in St. Peters, the cardinals proceeded to the Sistine Chapel while the Litany of Saints was chanted. After taking their places the "Veni Creator Spiritus" ("Hymn to the Holy Spirit") was sung. At the first conclave since their restoration, Michelangelo's Last Judgement and ceiling appeared in their full glory. The occasion was very solemn. The Cardinal Dean of the Sacred College, Joseph Ratzinger, then read the oath: is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Veni Creator Spiritus is a hymn normally sung in Gregorian Chant and is considered the most famous of hymns. ... A hymn is a type of song, usually religious, specifically written for the purpose of praise, adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a god or other religiously significant figure. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream Christianity, the... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... Image:Michelangelo - Fresco of the Last Judgment. ... The Dean of the College of Cardinals is the president of the College of Cardinals in the Roman Catholic Church and as such is always a Cardinal of the Holy Roman Church of the episcopal order. ... This article is becoming very long. ...

We, the cardinal electors present in this election of the Supreme Pontiff promise, vow and swear, as individuals and as a group, to observe faithfully and scrupulously the prescriptions contained in the Apostolic Constitution of the Supreme Pontiff John Paul II, Universi Dominici Gregis, published on 22 February 1996. We likewise promise, pledge and swear that whichever of us by divine disposition is elected Roman Pontiff will commit himself faithfully to carrying out the munus Petrinum of Pastor of the Universal Church and will not fail to affirm and defend strenuously the spiritual and temporal rights and the liberty of the Holy See. In a particular way, we promise and swear to observe with the greatest fidelity and with all persons, clerical or lay, secrecy regarding everything that in any way relates to the election of the Roman Pontiff and regarding what occurs in the place of the election, directly or indirectly related to the results of the voting; we promise and swear not to break this secret in any way, either during or after the election of the new Pontiff, unless explicit authorization is granted by the same Pontiff; and never to lend support or favor to any interference, opposition or any other form of intervention, whereby secular authorities of whatever order and degree or any group of people or individuals might wish to intervene in the election of the Roman Pontiff.
Each cardinal elector affirmed the oath by placing his hands on the book of the Gospels saying aloud:
And I, (name), do so promise, pledge and swear. So help me God and these Holy Gospels which I touch with my hand.

Cardinal Ratzinger, as Dean of the Sacred College, was first to go forward. He was followed by the Vice Dean, Angelo Sodano, and all the other cardinals in turn. is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ...


Two cardinals were striking by their different attire in the sea of red and white: Cardinals Ignace Daoud of the Syrian Catholic Church and Lubomyr Husar of the Ukrainian Catholic Church. After Archbishop Piero Marini (the Papal Master of Ceremonies) intoned the words extra omnes (Latin, "everybody out!"), the members of the choir, security guards, and others left the chapel and the doors of the Sistine Chapel were closed, leaving the cardinals in conclave. His Eminence Ignace Moussa I Cardinal Daoud (born 18 September 1930) is a Cardinal Bishop, the Patriarch Emeritus of Antioch for the Syrian Catholic Church and Prefect of the Congregation for the Oriental Churches in the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Syrian Catholic Church is a Christian church in the Levant in full communion with the pope having practices and rites in common with the Jacobites. ... His Eminence Lubomyr Cardinal Husar (born 26 February 1933) is a Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church, Major Archbishop of Lviv of the Ukrainians, and is the primate of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, the second largest church of the Catholic Communion. ... The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church (UGCC), also known as the Ukrainian Catholic Church, is one of the successor Churches to the acceptance of Christianity by Grand Prince Vladimir the Great (Ukrainian Volodymyr) of Kiev (Kyiv), in 988. ... Piero Marini (born 13 Jan 1942) is a Roman Catholic archbishop, currently serving as the Master of Pontifical Liturgical Celebrations. ...


Results of the first ballot

On the first ballot, according to the Italian daily Il Messaggero, Carlo Maria Martini obtained 40 votes, Joseph Ratzinger obtained 38 votes, and Camillo Ruini a substantial number of votes, the rest of the votes being dispersed. Black Smoke (fumata nera) emerged from the top of the Sistine Chapel at around 20:00 Rome time. This signaled that the first ballot had been held and that no new pope had been elected. His Eminence Carlo Maria Cardinal Martini, S.J. (born 15 February 1927) is an Italian clergyman. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Camillo Cardinal Ruini. ...


Second day

The new pope Benedict XVI.
The new pope Benedict XVI.

The morning session of the second day ended with the Sistine Chapel chimney emitting black smoke once again (even this time it was much lighter in the first few seconds; experts say this was due to the fact that the stove was new and too clean), meaning that no new pope had been elected. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1559x1536, 1268 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): 2005 Pope Benedict XVI List of popes His Holiness Papal conclave, 2005 Catholic Church hierarchy History... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1559x1536, 1268 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): 2005 Pope Benedict XVI List of popes His Holiness Papal conclave, 2005 Catholic Church hierarchy History... This article is becoming very long. ...


According to the Italian newspapers Pope Benedict XVI indeed reached or even exceeded the required 78 votes during the third ballot, but he asked for a vote of confirmation in the afternoon. If he had that it would be consistent with the actions of John Paul I, who is said to have made the same request. However, this scenario seems unlikely in that on some interpretations this would not be in conformity with the laws governing the conclave. This article is becoming very long. ... Pope John Paul I (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo I), born Albino Luciani, (October 17, 1912—September 28, 1978) reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and as Sovereign of Vatican City from August 26, 1978 until his death. ...


The cardinals left for lunch before returning for the afternoon session of balloting. Tens of thousands of people, waiting in St Peter's Square for the result, were quiet at the result and the reaction was very different from the first day.


At 15:50 UTC, white smoke rose above the Sistine Chapel followed by the pealing of bells ten minutes later. Pope Benedict XVI (Joseph Ratzinger) had been elected after four ballots. Indications given by the Italian press suggest that he obtained between 95 and 107 votes for this fourth and last ballot.


Things were not glitch free as the voting slips and notes were lit after that ballot. "All of a sudden, the whole Sistine Chapel was filled with smoke," Adrianus Johannes Simonis was quoted as saying by La Stampa and La Repubblica. His Eminence Adrianus Johannes Cardinal Simonis (born November 26, 1931) is a Dutch prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


"Fortunately, there were no art historians present," joked Christoph Schönborn, in a reference to the priceless paintings and other treasures in the building. Christoph Cardinal Schönborn His Eminence Christoph Cardinal Schönborn OP (who would have been Count Christoph Maria Michael Hugo Damian Peter Adalbert von Schönborn if Austrian law on nobility were not in place), born on January 22, 1945 at Skalken castle west of Leitmeritz, in Bohemia, which is...


John Paul II had laid down that the bells were also to be rung, but they began only after 10 minutes of delay. To date, no one has explained the glitch, but there is speculation that the authorities had to disable the normal electrically powered system for ringing the hours (it was coming up on 18:00), thus blocking the mechanism. Another rumor, difficult to verify, holds that the official in charge of the bells, caught up in the excitement of news of the election, forgot to ring them until reminded of it about 10 minutes after the Conclave ended.


Vote counts from a "leaked" diary

On September 23, 2005 a text purporting to be the unauthorized diary of a cardinal was published by the Italian magazine Limes. The diary gave the impression that Ratzinger more or less scraped in, and that his chief rival in the election was not Cardinal Martini, but rather Jorge Cardinal Bergoglio of Buenos Aires. The story was covered by several agencies. In reality the document little resembles a real diary and its credibility runs into other problems, such as the fact that any notes taken in the voting sessions had to be handed over and burned each time. [1] is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jorge Mario Cardinal Bergoglio (born December 17, 1936) is a Roman Catholic priest of the Society of Jesus. ...


See also

Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... Veni Creator Spiritus is a hymn normally sung in Gregorian Chant and is considered the most famous of hymns. ... Papabile (plural: Papabili) is an unofficial Italian term first coined by Vaticanologists and now used internationally in many languages to describe cardinals of whom it is thought likely or possible that they will be elected pope. ...

External links

Procedures and news

The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ...

Punditry and predictions

Categories: Magazines stubs | Microsoft subsidiaries | Websites | The Washington Post ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... The Washington Times is a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C.. It was founded in 1982 as a conservative alternative to the Washington Post by members of the controversial Unification Church. ... The Financial Times (FT) is an international business newspaper printed on distinctive salmon pink broadsheet paper. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.cwnews.com/news/viewstory.cfm?recnum=39784.
Papal conclave, 2005

Cardinal electors | Cardinals over age of 80 | Papabili
Pope John Paul II | Pope Benedict XVI | Prophecy of the Popes Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The following were the cardinal electors in the 2005 papal conclave. ... This is a list of Roman Catholic Cardinals over the age of 80 as of the death of Pope John Paul II on April 2, 2005. ... A number of men had been named as potential successors (papabili) to Pope John Paul II, who died on April 2, 2005, before the 2005 conclave. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... This article is becoming very long. ... The Prophecy of the Popes, attributed to Saint Malachy, is a list of 112 short phrases in Latin. ...

Papal Conclaves 1800–2005

1800 | 1823 | 1829 | 1830–1831 | 1846 | 1878 | 1903 | 1914
1922 | 1939 | 1958 | 1963 | August 1978 | October 1978 | 2005 The Sistine Chapel is the location of the conclave since 1492. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Papal conclave of 1799-1800 followed the death of Pope Pius VI on 29 August 1799 and led to the selection of Giorgio Barnaba Luigi Chiaramonti, later Pius VII, as pope on 14 March 1800. ... The 1823 Papal conclave led to the election of Pope Leo XII. Categories: Catholic-related stubs ... The 1829 Papal conclave led to the election of Pope Pius VIII. Categories: Catholic-related stubs ... A Papal conclave was held commencing December 14, 1830 after the death of Pope Pius VIII. It did not conclude until the February 2, 1831 election of Mauro Alberto Cappellari as Pope Gregory XVI. No conclave since has lasted as much as one week, but at the time no conclave... The Quirinal Palace The Popes residence as head of state of the Papal States was the venue for the 1846 conclave. ... The Papal conclave of 1878 resulted from the death of Pope Pius IX in the Apostolic Palace in the Vatican on 7 February 1878. ... The Papal conclave of 1903 was caused by the death of the 93 year old Pope Leo XIII, who at that stage was the third longest reigning pope in history. ... The Papal conclave of 1914 was held to choose a successor Pope Pius X, who had died in the Vatican on 20 August 1914. ... After a reign of just eight years, Pope Benedict XV died on 22 January 1922 of pneumonia. ... Cardinal Pacelli, the Secretary of State, was elected pope. ... The Papal conclave of 1958 occurred following the death of Pope Pius XII on October 9, 1958 in Castel Gandolfo, the papal summer residence in Italy, after a 19-year papacy. ... The Papal conclave of 1963 was convoked following the death of Pope John XXIII on June 3 of that same year in the Apostolic Palace. ... Following the death of Paul VI on August 6, 1978, the first conclave of the year was held on August 25–26 in Vatican City. ... The arms of the vacancy of the Holy See The October 1978 papal conclave was triggered by the sudden death, after only thirty three days in office, of Pope John Paul I. The Church had thought it had elected a pope in August 1978 who would reign for at least...


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BIGpedia - Papal election - Encyclopedia and Dictionary Online (5255 words)
A papal election is the method by which the Roman Catholic Church fills the office of Bishop of Rome, whose incumbent is known as the Pope.
Gregory VII was the last to submit to the interference of the Holy Roman Emperors; the breach between him and the Holy Roman Empire caused by the Investiture Controversy led to the abolition of the Emperor's role.
After the papal name is chosen, the officials are readmitted to the conclave, and the Master of Pontifical Liturgical writes a document recording the acceptance and the new name of the Pope.
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