FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Papal Fanon
Jump to: navigation, search
Pope John Paul II wearing the fanon on his shoulders.
Enlarge
Pope John Paul II wearing the fanon on his shoulders.

The fanon is a vestment reserved for the Pope only during a pontifical Mass. It consists of a double mozzetta, one of silk and gold, the first going under the stole and the second over the chasuble and under the pallium. Jump to: navigation, search Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef Wojtyła (May 18, 1920 - April 2, 2005), reigned as pope of the Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his death, making his the third-longest pontificate in the history of the... Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Anglican Churches. ... Jump to: navigation, search The pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Catholic Church. ... moz•zet•ta Pronunciation: (mō-zetu; It. ... Jump to: navigation, search The stole (a liturgical vestment of various Christian denominations) is an embroidered band of cloth, formerly usually of silk, about two and one-half to three metres long and seven to ten centimetres wide, whose ends are usually broadened out. ... A fiddleback chasuble from the church of Saint Gertrude in Maarheeze in the Netherlands The chasuble is the outermost liturgical vestment worn by clergy for the celebration of the Eucharist among Western-tradition Christian churches that use full vestments, primarily the Roman Catholic Church and high church congregations in the... A Pallium The Pallium or Pall (derived, so far as the name is concerned, from the Roman pallium or palla, a woollen cloak) is an ecclesiastical vestment in the Roman Catholic Church, originally peculiar to the Pope, but for many centuries past bestowed by him on metropolitans and primates as...


It hasn't been used commonly in recent times but its use has not been officially abolished.


See Also

The most famous symbol of the Papacy is almost certainly the triregnum (a crown with three levels), also called the tiara or triple crown; recent Popes (since Pope John Paul I) have not, however, worn the triregnum. ... Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Anglican Churches. ...

External Links

  • Catholic Encyclopedia article
  • Photos of several popes wearing the fanon
Papal rituals, symbols & ceremonial Vatican City: Coat of Arms

Apostolic Palace | Papal ceremonial | Coat of Arms of popes | Conclave | Coronation | Holy See | Inauguration | Papal Oath | Papal Ring | Papal Fanon | Sedia Gestoria | Sistine Chapel | Basilica of St. John Lateran | Pallium | St. Peter's Basilica | St. Peter's Square | Papal Tiara | Vatican City
Vatican coat of arms This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... The Apostolic Palace , also called the Papal Palace or the Palace of the Vatican, is the official residence of the Pope in the Vatican City. ... Every pope of the Roman Catholic Church has his own personal coat of arms that serves as a symbol of his papacy. ... The Sistine Chapel is the location of the conclave. ... Pope Pius XII, in coronation robes and wearing the 1877 Papal Tiara, is carried through St. ... Jump to: navigation, search Pope Paul VI (1963-1978) is crowned at the last papal coronation to date, in 1963. ... The Papal Oath, also known as the oath against modernism, was an oath traditionally sworn by the popes of the Catholic Church during their Papal Coronation. ... The Ring of the Fisherman or Pescatorio is an official part of the regalia worn by the pope, described by the Roman Catholic Church (of which he is the head) as the successor of Saint Peter, a fisherman by trade. ... Pope John Paul I being carried on the Sedia Gestatoria The sedia gestatoria is the portable throne on which Popes are sometimes carried. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Sistine Chapel (Italian: Cappella Sistina) is a chapel in the Palace of the Vatican, the official residence of the Roman Catholic Pope in the Vatican City. ... The late Baroque façade of the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano was completed by Alessandro Galilei in 1735 after winning a competition for the design. ... A Pallium The Pallium or Pall (derived, so far as the name is concerned, from the Roman pallium or palla, a woollen cloak) is an ecclesiastical vestment in the Roman Catholic Church, originally peculiar to the Pope, but for many centuries past bestowed by him on metropolitans and primates as... The Basilica of Saint Peter, officially known in Italian as the Basilica di San Pietro in Vaticano and colloquially called Saint Peters Basilica, ranks second among the five major basilicas of Rome and its Vatican City enclave. ... Berninis piazza was extended by the Via della Conciliazione, Mussolinis grand avenue of approach. ... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, in Latin as the Triregnum, or in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown of Byzantine and Persian origin that is the symbol of the papacy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Fanon (573 words)
But it is certain that as early as the end of the twelfth century the fanon was worn solely by the pope, as is evident from the express statement of Innocent III (1198-1216).
The present usage, according to which the pope is vested, in addition to the fanon, with an amice under the alb, did not appear, at the earliest, until the close of the Middle Ages.
Late in the Middle Ages it was made of white silk, as is shown by the inventory of the year 1295 of the papal treasure, as well as by numerous works of art; the favourite ornamentation was one of narrow stripes of gold and of some colour, especially red, woven into the silk.
Ring of the Fisherman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (446 words)
During the rite of papal inauguration or papal coronation the Camerlengo ceremonially slips the ring on the left fourth finger of the new pope.
Upon a papal death, the Ring of the Fisherman is ceremonially crushed in the presence of other cardinals by the Camerlengo, using a silver hammer.
A letter written by Pope Clement IV to his nephew Peter Grossi in 1265 includes the earliest known mention of the Ring of the Fisherman, used for sealing all private correspondence by pressing the ring into red sealing wax melted onto a folded piece of paper or envelope.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m