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Encyclopedia > Panslavism
National flag of all Slavs approved on the Pan-Slav convention in Prague in 1848
National flag of all Slavs approved on the Pan-Slav convention in Prague in 1848

The 19th century movement Pan-Slavism was a movement in the mid 19th century aimed at unity of all the Slavic peoples. Its main center was in the Balkans where Southern Slavs had been ruled over by the two great empires, Austria and the Ottoman Empire. National Flag of all Slavs This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... National Flag of all Slavs This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... Prague (Praha in Czech) is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Imperial motto El Muzaffer Daima The Ever Victorious (as written in tugra) Official language Ottoman Turkish National Anthem The March for Sultan Abdul-Mejid Capital Ä°stanbul (Constantinople/Asitane/Konstantiniyye ) Sovereigns Sultans of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40 million Area 6. ...

Contents


Origins

Pan-Slavism began much like Pan-Germanism, both of which grew from the sense of unity and Nationalism experienced within ethnic groups under the domination of France during the Napoleonic Wars. Like in other Romantic nationalist movements, Slavic intellectuals and scholars in the developing fields of history, philology, and folklore actively encouraged feelings of shared identity and ancestry. Pan-Germanism, one of the ethnically-charged political movements of the 19th century for unity of the German-speaking peoples of Europe. ... Nationalism is an ideology which holds that the nation, ethnicity or national identity is a fundamental unit of human social life, and makes certain political claims based on that belief, above all the claim that the nation is the only legitimate basis for the state, and that each nation is... The Napoleonic Wars are the wars fought during Napoleon Bonapartes rule of France. ... History Forums - History is Happening -Discuss all historical topics, as well as current events, in an academic setting. ... Philology is the study of ancient texts and languages. ... For the Nelly Furtado album, see Folklore (album). ...


Following the end of the Wars in 1815, Europe's leaders sought to restore the pre-war status quo. Austria's representative in the Congress of Vienna, Metternich, felt the greatest threat to this in Austria was the pan-Slavic movement, which sought to establish the independence of the Slavic peoples in Austria-Hungary and Turkey. A successful Slavic uprising would result in the disintegration of the Austrian Empire; as a result, Austria was aggressive in response to Slavic challenges and pursued a deeply repressive domestic policy. 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Congress of Vienna was a conference between ambassadors from the major powers in Europe that was chaired by the Austrian statesman Klemens Wenzel von Metternich and held in Vienna, Austria, from October 1, 1814, to June 9, 1815. ... Klemens Wenzel von Metternich Klemens Wenzel Nepomuk Lothar Fürst von Metternich-Winneberg-Beilstein (May 15, 1773 - June 11, 1858) (sometimes rendered in English as Prince Clemens Metternich) was an Austrian politician and statesman and perhaps the most important diplomat of his era. ...


Pan-Slavism co-existed with Southern Slavic independence. The Southern Slavs were some of the first to revolt against the decaying Ottoman Empire. In 1806 and again in 1815, the Serbs secured their independence from the Ottomans. Almost immediately after Serbia's independence, the Serbs began seeking expansion and unity of all the southern Slavs under their own rule. 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Commonly used symbols of the Pan-Slavic movement were the Pan-Slavic colours (red, white and blue) and the Pan-Slavic anthem, Hey, Slavs. The Pan-Slavic colours, red, blue and white, are colours used on the flags of most Slavic states and peoples. ... Hey, Slavs is an anthemic song dedicated to Slavic peoples. ...


Pan-Slavism in the 19th century

The first Pan-Slav convention was held in Prague in 1848 and was specifically both anti-Austrian and anti-Russian. The relationship of the Russians of the Russian Empire to the movement was always troubled. The northern movement was suppressed heavily by the three Empires, Austria, Prussia/Germany, and Russia. Prague (Praha in Czech) is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of Russian history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start...


Pan-Slavism at the beginning of the 20th Century

Following World War I, the Pan-Slavic movement was, to an extent, successful. Czechoslovakia created a semi-northern Pan-Slavic state. In the south, the creation of Yugoslavia did unite most southern Slavs under the influence of the Serbs. The problem that Yugoslavia would face was the domination by the Serbs. The same was for Czechoslovakia where Slovaks resented Czech domination and majority. Domination and opposition ultimately led to their collapse in unity. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ...


Pan-Slavism in the Balkan Countries

Pan-Slavism in the south was much different, being that it often turned to Russia for support. The Pan-Slavic movement was based around Serbs and Serbia. The Serbian people sought to unite all of the Southern, Balkan Slavs under their rule. The problem was that Serbia was a tiny nation and the Austro-Hungarian Empire,though unstable, was still a strong opponent that could crush Serbia easily. The idea of Russia protecting Southern Slavic unity was favored.


Pan-Slavism in Poland

Poland is a country that generally has been the most hostile towards Pan-Slavism given its long struggle for freedom from Russia. The only time in history when it attempted to create a state with other Western Slavic nations was in the 11th century when the king of Poland Boleslaw Chrobry annexed Bohemia and Moravia attempting to incorporate them into the Polish kingdom. It did not work and those entities soon regained autonomy. Poland often preferred to ally itself with non-Slavic nations such as Hungary or Lithuania as the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth from 1569 to 1795. Poland also tended to polonize the Slavic and non-Slavic populations on territories it controlled rather than discuss any potential deals on a possible all-Slavic state. The 19th century Pan-Slavism influence had little impact in Poland except for sympathy towards the other oppressed Slavic nations in regaining independence (but not to the extent of creating a Pan-Slavic state or even federation). After Poland regained its independence (from Prussia, Austria and Russia) in 1918 no major or minor force considered Pan-Slavism as a serious alternative, even despite the constant danger of Germanization. During Poland's communist era the USSR used Pan-slavism as propaganda tool to justify its control over the country. After 1989 the issue of the Pan-Slavism has completely fallen out of the political agenda, and is widely seen as ideology of Russian imperialism. Reign From 992 until 1025 Coronation On April 18, 1025 in Gniezno Cathedral, Poland Royal House Piast Coat of Arms Orzeł Piastowski Parents Mieszko I Dubrawka Consorts Rikdaga Judith Enmilda Oda Children with Judith Bezprym with Enmilda Regelina Mieszko II Lambert Otton with Oda Matylda Date of Birth 966/967... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Events January 11 - First recorded lottery in England. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Polonization (in Polish: polonizacja) is the assumption, voluntary or involuntary, complete or partial, of the Polish language or another real or supposed Polish attribute. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... A federation (from the Latin fÅ“dus, covenant) is a state comprised of a number of self-governing regions (often themselves referred to as states) united by a central (federal) government. ... 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Modern day developments

The idea of unity of the Slavic people was all but gone after World War II. Because of failures in small-scale attempts at unification such as in Yugoslavia or Czechoslovakia, the idea of unity on a large scale is considered dead. Countries in the Slavic Europe generally tend to have good relations and sympathy towards one another but nothing except for culture and heritage oriented organizations is currently considered as a form of approachment among the countries of Slavic Europe. Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in all south Slavic languages) is a term used for three separate but successive political entities that existed during most of the 20th century on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe. ...


See also

Slavophile is a Westernized variant of the original Russian term Slavianophile. ... Anti-Slavism was the movement that existed throughout World War II, parallel with the Anti-Semitism. ... Austroslavism was a political concept and program aimed to solve the problem of Slavic people national minorities in the Austrian Empire. ...

External links

  • http://www.panslavia.com/

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mama Bear and Baby Bear: (2817 words)
Panslavism as an ideology was a natural outgrowth of western Romanticism, coupled with the unification efforts during the mid nineteenth century in Central Europe.
The term "panslavism" was first used in the mid 1830s by intellectuals in Russia to describe a cultural, linguistic and religious bond felt by many in eastern Europe, but a general feeling of a slavic unity had permeated Russian and south slavic life since the fifteenth century.
Panslavs from both the Balkans and Mother Russia became incensed at the thought of "German" occupation of Bosnia.
Slavic peoples - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1616 words)
The idea that the Slavic people have more in common then their origin, the origin of their languages and some cultural aspects is derived from romantic nationalism, the panslavism movement and the notion of race as a biological basis of nations.
In the 19th century, Pan-Slavism developed as a movement among intellectuals, scholars, and poets, but it rarely influenced practical politics.Tsarists Russia used panslavism as ideology justifing its territorial conquests in Central Europe, and as such the ideology became associated with Russian imperialism.
The common Slavic experience of communism combined with the repeated usage of the ideology by Soviet propaganda after World War II within the Eastern bloc (Warsaw Pact) was a forced high-level political and economic hegemony of USSR dominated by Russians, and as such despised by rest of conquered nations.
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