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Encyclopedia > Pannonian Rusyn language

Pannonian Rusyn or simply Rusyn (Ruthenian) is a Slavic language or dialect spoken in north-western Serbia and eastern Croatia (therefore also called Yugoslavo-Ruthenian, Vojvodina-Ruthenian or Bačka-Ruthenian). It is closer to West Slavic languages, to Slovak in particular, but also enjoys Eastern Slavic phonetics and vocabulary, as well as the influence from the surrounding Southern Slavic languages (Serbian and Croatian). Pannonian Rusyn is one of the official languages of the Serbian Autonomous Province of Vojvodina. Ruthenia is a name applied to parts of Eastern Europe which were populated by Eastern Slavic peoples, as well as to various states that existed in this territory in the past. ... The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup of Indo-European languages, have speakers in most of Eastern Europe, in much of the Balkans, in parts of Central Europe, and in the northern part of Asia. ... A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language used by people from a particular geographic area. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Independence- Declared from the Ottoman Empire Gained autonomy 1817 Independence July 13, 1878 Area – Total – % water 88,361 km² n/a Population – Total (2002) (not including data for Kosovo and Metohia Province) – Density 7. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in all south Slavic languages, in Macedonian and Serbian Cyrillic Југославија) is a term used for three separate but successive political entities that existed during most of the 20th century on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official languages Serbian, Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusin1 Capital Novi Sad Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  21,500 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)  â€“ Density  2,031,992  94. ... Bačka (Serbian: Бачка Hungarian: Bácska) is an area of the Pannonian plain lying between the rivers Danube and Tisa. ... This article or section should be merged with List of West Slavic languages The West Slavic languages is a subdivision of the Slavic language group (q. ... This article or section should be merged with List of East Slavic languages The East Slavic languages constitute one of three regional subgroups of Slavic languages, currently spoken in Eastern Europe. ... The Serbian language is one of the standard versions of the Å tokavian dialect (former standard was known as Serbo-Croatian language). ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official languages Serbian, Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusin1 Capital Novi Sad Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  21,500 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)  â€“ Density  2,031,992  94. ...


While it is classified as a microlanguage by the Serbian authors, it is considered a Ukrainian dialect in Ukraine (which does not recognize Rusyns as a nation) and simply as a Rusyn (Ruthenian) dialect by Slovaks and northern Ruthenians. Ethnologue consideres it a Slovak dialect. Ethnologue: Languages of the World is a web and print publication of SIL International (formerly known as the Summer Institute of Linguistics), a Christian linguistic service organization which studies lesser-known languages primarily to provide the speakers with native language biblical texts. ...


Like the northern Rusyn language, it constitutes a mixture of some Eastern Slovak dialects and East Slavic features (namely, Russian Church Slavonic, Russian and Old Ruthenian). This mixture is due to the fact that these Rusyns emigrated to Bačka from Eastern Slovakia around the middle of the 18th century. Like most modern Ruthenians, they are Greek Catholics and therefore have closer ties with Ukraine. The language also has some Southern Slavic features, and it is sometimes called "a Slavic Esperanto". Rusyn, though by most outsiders considered one language and even having only one SIL code rue, is in fact the name of two independent languages spoken by Rusyns: Carpatho-Rusyn (also called Ruthenian) Pannonian-Rusyn (also called Rusnak) Carpatho-Rusyn (Ruthenian) The Rusyn language of the Carpathian Mountains is an... This article or section should be merged with List of East Slavic languages The East Slavic languages constitute one of three regional subgroups of Slavic languages, currently spoken in Eastern Europe. ... Page from the Spiridon Psalter in Church Slavonic. ... Ruthenian was a historic East Slavic language, spoken in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and after 1569 in the East Slavic territories of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Since the Rusyn language was officially not recognized/prohibited in Ukraine and in Czechoslovakia in the past (Ukrainian was prescribed for Rusyns), the Rusyns in Yugoslavia, where the language was recognized, had to create their own language codification: The language has been codified by Mikola Kočiš (Микола Кочиш) in Правопис руского язика ('Orthography of Rusyn', 1971) and Ґраматика руского язика ('Grammar of Rusyn', 1974) and is written with Cyrillic letters. The Cyrillic alphabet (or azbuka, from the old name of the first two letters) is an alphabet used to write six natural Slavic languages (Belarusian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian, and Ukrainian) and many other languages of the former Soviet Union, Asia and Eastern Europe. ...


Pannonian Rusyns themselves call their language (бачваньска) руска бешеда or (бачваньски) руски язик. Their cultural centre is Ruski Kerestur (Руски Керестур, Serbian: Руски Крстур or Ruski Krstur). Although the number of Pannonian Rusyns (Pannonian Ruthenians) is much lower than that of the northern Rusyns (Transcarpathian Ruthenians) — just 23,286 according to the Yugoslav census of 1981 — they were lucky to live in a multinational state that granted them certain minority rights as early as the 1970s, so that there is a Rusyn-medium grade school in Ruski Kerestur (with some 250 schoolbooks printed so far for this school and elementary schools), a professorial chair for Rusyn studies at Novi Sad University. There are regular television and radio programmes in Pannonian Rusyn, including the multilingual radio station Radio Novi Sad, which serves all of Vojvodina. The breakdown of minutes of Novi Sad original broadcasting by language in 2001 was: 23,5% Serbian, 23,5% Hungarian, 5,7% Slovak, 5,7% Romanian, 3,8% Rusyn, 2,2% Romany, and 0,2% Ukrainian. The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... Ruski Krstur (Serbian: Руски Крстур or Ruski Krstur, Rusyn: Руски Керестур) is a village in Serbia and Montenegro, in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina. ... The Serbian language is one of the standard versions of the Å tokavian dialect (former standard was known as Serbo-Croatian language). ... A multinational state is a state in which the population consists of two or more ethnically distinct nations that are of significant size. ... The University of Novi Sad (Univerzitet u Novom Sadu/Универзитет у Новом Саду) is a university located in Novi Sad, the second largest city in Serbia and Montenegro. ... The Serbian language is one of the standard versions of the Å tokavian dialect (former standard was known as Serbo-Croatian language). ... Romany (or Romani) is the language of the Roma and Sinti, peoples often referred to in English as Gypsies. The Indo-Aryan Romany language should not be confused with either Romanian (spoken by Romanians), or Romansh (spoken in parts of southeastern Switzerland), both of which are Romance languages. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Pannonian Rusyn language | English | Dictionary & Translation by Babylon (216 words)
Pannonian Rusyn or simply Rusyn (Ruthenian) is a Slavic language or dialect spoken in north-western Serbia and eastern Croatia (therefore also called Yugoslavo-Ruthenian, Vojvodina-Ruthenian or Bačka-Ruthenian).
Pannonian Rusyn is one of the official languages of the Serbian Autonomous Province of Vojvodina.
Rusyn is an East Slavic language (along with Russian, Belarusian and Ukrainian) close to Ukrainian that is spoken by the Rusyns.
Rusyns - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (984 words)
Rusyns, also called Ruthenians, Ruthenes, Rusins, Rysins, Carpatho-Rusins, and Russniaks, are a modern group of ethnic groups that speak the Rusyn language and are descended from the minority of Ruthenians who did not adopt a Ukrainian national identity and become Ukrainians in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
Rusyn, less accurately referred to as the Ruthenian language, is in substance like Ukrainian -- enough so that the Ukrainian government considers it merely a dialect of Ukrainian, to the resentment of some Rusyns.
The Rusyn language in Vojvodina, however, sharing many similarities with Slovak, is sometimes considered a separate (micro)language, and sometimes a dialect of Slovak; see Pannonian Rusyn language for details.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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