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Encyclopedia > Panmunjeom

Panmunjeom in Gyeonggi province is a village on the de facto border between North and South Korea, where the 1953 armistice that halted the Korean War was signed. The building where the armistice was signed still stands, though it is on the northern side of the Military Demarcation Line, which runs through the middle of the Demilitarized Zone. It is considered one of the last vestiges of the Cold War. It should not be confused with the Joint Security Area (JSA) nearby, where discussions between North and South still take place in blue buildings which straddle the Military Demarcation Line. Gyeonggi is the most populous province in South Korea. ... A province is a territorial unit, almost always a country subdivision. ... North Korea, officially the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (DPRK; Korean: Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin Konghwaguk; Hangul: 조선민주주의인민공화국; Hanja: 朝鮮民主主義人民共和國), is a country in eastern Asia... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... The Military Demarcation Line is the border between North and South Korea. ... Map of the Korean DMZ. The DMZ is given in red. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... The Joint Security Area (JSA), often called the Truce Village in both the media[1][2] and various military accounts[3], is the only portion of the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) where South and North Korean forces stand face-to-face. ...


Location

The village is 53 kilometres north-northwest of Seoul and 10 kilometres east of Kaesong and was the meeting place of the Military Armistice Commission. The meetings took place in several tents set up on the south side of the Kaesong-Seoul road on the west bank of the Sa'cheon stream; the village, a small cluster of less than ten huts, was opposite the negotiation site on the north side. The eighteen copies of Volume I and II of the armistice were signed by the Senior Delegates of each side in a building constructed by both sides over a 48-hour period (North Korea provided labor and some supplies, the United Nations Command provided some supplies, generators and lighting to allow the work to continue at night). After the cease-fire was signed, construction began in September of 1953 on a new site located approximately one kilometer east of the village; this is the Joint Security Area and all meetings between North Korea and the United Nations Command or South Korea have taken place here since its completion. The JSA is often, mistakenly, called Panmunjeom. After the war, when all civilians were removed from the DMZ (except for two villages near the JSA on opposite sides of the MDL), the empty village of Panmunjeom fell into disrepair and eventually disappeared from the landscape. There is no evidence of it today, however, the building constructed for the signing of the armistice has since been renamed by North Korea as the Peace Museum. Seoul   is the capital of South Korea and is located on the Han River in the countrys northwest. ... Kaesong city centre Kaesŏng (Gaeseong) is a city in North Hwanghae Province, North Korea, a former Directly Governed City, and the capital of Korea during the Koryo Dynasty. ... The United Nations Command (Korea) is the unified command structure for the multinational military forces supporting the Republic of Korea (South Korea or ROK) during and after the Korean War. ... The Joint Security Area (JSA), often called the Truce Village in both the media[1][2] and various military accounts[3], is the only portion of the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) where South and North Korean forces stand face-to-face. ... North Korea Peace Museum The North Korea Peace Museum is in the building constructed to house the signing of the Korean War Armistice Agreement on 27 July 1953. ...


Brief background

United Nations forces met with North Korean and Chinese officials at Panmunjeom from 1951 to 1953 for truce talks. The talks dragged on for several months. The main point of contention during the talks was the question surrounding the prisoners of war. North Koreans largely mistreated American and allied POWs, including subjecting them to brainwashing. [1][2][3] The problem was very different for North Korean and Chinese POWs. As many as one third of the captured North Koreans and many more of the Chinese did not want to be returned to their communist countries. Moreover, South Korea was uncompromising in its demand for a unified state. Dorlands Medical Dictionary defines brainwashing (also known as thought reform or re-education) as any systematic effort aimed at instilling certain attitudes and beliefs in a person against his will, usually beliefs in conflict with his prior beliefs and knowledge. ...


On June 8, 1953, an agreement to the POW problem was reached. Those prisoners who refused to return to their communist countries were allowed to live under a neutral supervising commission for three months. At the end of this time period, those who still refused repatriation would be released. Among those who refused repatriation were twenty three American POWs, all but two of whom chose to defect to the People's Republic of China. June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... This is a list of the twenty-two United Nations soldiers and POWs (one Briton and 21 Americans) who declined repatriation to the United States after the Korean War, and their subsequent fates. ...


A final agreement was reached on July 27, 1953. The United Nations, China and North Korea agreed to an armistice, effectively ending the fighting; however, South Korea refused to sign it. The agreement established a 4 kilometer wide demilitarized zone along the 38th parallel, effectively dividing Korea into two separate countries. Although most troops and all heavy weapons were to be removed from the area, it has been heavily armed by both sides since the end of the fighting. Since South Korea never signed the armistice, the two countries technically remain at war. July 27 is the 208th day (209th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 157 days remaining. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Panmunjeom travel guide - Wikitravel (1790 words)
Panmunjeom (판문점), also P'anmunjŏm, is on the demarcation line between North and South Korea.
A unique living relic of the Cold War era, Panmunjeom is a small village that happened to lie at the final battle front of the Korean War.
Visits to Panmunjeom from the South Korean side must be arranged in advance as part of an organized tour, although for foreigners three days notice usually suffices.
Panmunjeom - Galbijim (964 words)
Panmunjeom in Gyeonggi-do is a village on the de facto border between North and South Korea, where the 1953 armistice that halted the Korean War was signed.
A North Korean tunnel presumably constructed to conduct infiltration and invasion was discovered approximately 3 miles SSE of the village of Panmunjeom in 1978.
Some landmarks of Panmunjeom, like the Joint Security Area and the Bridge of No Return, were portrayed in the popular South Korean movie JSA.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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