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Encyclopedia > Panathenaic Games
Vase ca. 530 b.C.
Vase ca. 530 b.C.

The Panathenaic Games were a set of games held every four years in Athens in Ancient Greece. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3211x2304, 746 KB) Summary Greek vase with runners at the panathenaic games 530 b. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3211x2304, 746 KB) Summary Greek vase with runners at the panathenaic games 530 b. ... Athens (Greek: Αθήνα Athína IPA ) is the capital of Greece and one of the most famous cities in the world, named after goddess Athena. ... Ancient Greece is the term used to describe the Greek-speaking world in ancient times. ...


The games were actually part of a much larger religious festival, the Panathenaia, which was held every year. Every fourth year when the games were also held, the festival was known as the "Great Panathenaia," and was 3 or 4 days longer than the regular festival. They were the most prestigious games for the citizens of Athens, but they were not as important as the Olympic Games or the other Panhellenic Games. For months before the Olympic Games, runners relay the Olympic Flame from Olympia to the opening ceremony. ... Panhellenic Games is the collective term for four separate sports festivals held in ancient Greece. ...


The first Great Panathenaia was organized by Pisistratus in 566 BC, and was modelled on the Olympic Games. Pisistratus also added music and poetry competitions, which were part of the Pythian Games but not the Olympics. The games were divided into games for Athenians only, and games for Athenians and any other Greeks who wanted to participate. The games for all Greeks were essentially the same as the Olympics, with boxing, wrestling, pankration, pentathlon, and chariot racing, but chariot racing was the most prestigious of these, unlike the Olympics where the stadion (foot race) was more important. The winner of the chariot race received as a prize 140 amphorae full of olive oil. Pisistratus Peisistratos is the name of a major Athenian ruler, as well as a minor character in the Odyssey. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 610s BC 600s BC 590s BC 580s BC 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC 540s BC 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC Events and Trends 562 BC - Amel-Marduk succeeds Nebuchadnezzar as king of Babylon 560 BC - Neriglissar succeeds... View of the stadium of the Delphi sanctuary, used for the Pythian Games. ... Professional boxing bout featuring Ricardo Dominguez (left) vs. ... FILA Greatest Wrestler of 20th Century (Greco-Roman) Alexander Karelin throws Olympian Jeff Blatnick with his Karelin Lift Andrell Durden (top) and Edward Harris grapple for position during the All-Marine Wrestle Offs. ... It has been suggested that Ancient greek wrestling be merged into this article or section. ... The pentathlon (as opposed to the modern pentathlon) was an athletics event in the Olympic Games and other Panhellenic Games of Ancient Greece. ... // Early chariot racing It is unknown exactly where chariot racing began, but it may have been as old as chariots themselves. ... Map of downtown Rome during the Roman Empire showing the Stadion at the right The stadion (or stade) was an ancient foot race, part of the Olympic Games and the other Panhellenic Games. ... Amphoræ on display in Bodrum Castle, Turkey An amphora is a type of ceramic vase with two handles, used for the transportation and storage of perishable goods and more rarely as containers for the ashes of the dead or as prize awards. ...


The games in which only the Athenians were allowed to participate were somewhat different. These included a torch race to the Parthenon (the ancestor of the modern Olympic torch relay that takes place prior to the Games), mock infantry and cavalry battles, a javelin throw on horseback, the apobatai (a chariot race in which the driver had to jump out of the chariot, run alongside, and jump back in), the pyrriche (apparently military exercises accompanied by music), and the euandrion (essentially a beauty contest among the athletes). In later years there was also a rowing competition. The Parthenon seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west The Parthenon (Greek: Παρθενώνας) is the best-known surviving building of Ancient Greece and is regarded as one of the worlds greatest cultural monuments. ... A high school athlete throwing the javelin. ... Hittite chariot (drawing of an Egyptian relief) Approximate historical map of the spread of the chariot, 2000 –500 BC. dennis is a square of likes men and is fatA chariot is a two-wheeled, horse-drawn vehicle. ...


The Panathenaea also included poetic and musical competitions. Prizes were awarded for rhapsodic recitation of Homeric poetry, for instrumental music on the aulos (double oboe) and kithara (lyre), and for singing to the accompaniment of the aulos (aulody) and kithara (citharody). In classical antiquity, a rhapsode was a professional reciter of poetry, especially the epics of Homer, but also the wisdom-verse of Hesiod and the satires of Archilochus, among others. ... Bust of Homer in the British Museum For the fictional character in The Simpsons, see Homer Simpson. ... Satyr playing an aulos The ancient Greek aulos, often mistranslated as flute, was a double-piped reed instrument. ... Modern Oboe The oboe is a double reed musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... The kithara was an ancient Greek musical instrument. ... A lyre is a stringed musical instrument well known for its use in Classical Antiquity. ... In ancient Greece, an aulode was a performer who sang to the accompaniment of the aulos, a kind of double oboe. ... In ancient Greece, a citharode was a poet-performer who sang while accompanying himself on the kithara. ...


The procession to the Parthenon was, however, more important than the games themselves. During the Great Panathenaia (but not the regular Panathenaia held every year), a special robe (the peplos) was made by the women of Athens for the statue of Athena, which was carried to the Parthenon as part of the procession. There was also a large sacrifice made to Athena, the hekatombe ("sacrifice of a hundred oxen") and the meat from the sacrificed animals was used in an enormous banquet on the final night of the festival, the pannychis ("all-nighter"). A peplos (Greek: πέπλος) is a body-length Greek garment worn by women dating to before 500 BC. The peplos is essentially a tubular cloth, folded inside-out from the top about halfway down, so that what was the top of the tube is now at the waist and the... Drawing from a sculpture of Athena at the Louvre. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Panathenaic Games - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (408 words)
The games were actually part of a much larger religious festival, the Panathenaia, which was held every year.
They were the most prestigious games for the citizens of Athens, but they were not as important as the Olympic Games or the other Panhellenic Games.
The games for all Greeks were essentially the same as the Olympics, with boxing, wrestling, pankration, pentathlon, and chariot racing, but chariot racing was the most prestigious of these, unlike the Olympics where the stadion (foot race) was more important.
Hood Museum Presents: Coming of Age in Ancient Greece (2520 words)
Greek children’s games tend to delineate absolutely between winners and losers in a way that modern games do not, and an emphasis on trickery and deception in certain games may reflect something broader about a competitive society that valued such trickery as a sign of cleverness and strength.
We should see to use games as a means of directing children’s tastes and inclinations toward the station they are themselves to fill when adult.” Likewise, E. Harris discusses the possibility that the Greeks’ formal athletic competitions in which some children participated, served as good physical training for war.
Ourania, a game in which one player tosses a ball into the air and others try to catch it, was also popular, as was aporrhaxis, which entailed bouncing a ball and keeping it bouncing.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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