FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Panama Canal Zone

The Panama Canal Zone (Spanish: Zona del Canal de Panamá), was a 553 square mile (1,432 km²) territory inside of Panama, consisting of the Panama Canal and an area generally extending 5 miles (8.1 km) on each side of the centerline (but excluding Panama City and Colón, which otherwise would have fallen in part within the limits of the Canal Zone.) Its border spanned two of Panama's provinces and was created on November 18, 1903 with the signing of the Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty. Image File history File links CZSeal. ... A canal tug, making its way down to the Caribbean end of the canal, waits to be joined by a ship in the uppermost chamber of the Gatun Locks. ... Panama City (Spanish: Ciudad de Panamá), population 708,738, is the capital of Panama, located at the Pacific entrance of the Panama Canal, at . ... Colón as seen from the ocean in January 2000 Colón is a sea port city on the Caribbean Sea coast of Panama. ... Province is a name for a subnational entity. ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar with 43 days remaining. ... 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Map of Panama, with Panama canal On November 18, 1903, the United States and the newly independent (since November 3) nation of Panama signed the Hay-Bunau Varilla Treaty. ...


From 1903 to 1979 the territory was controlled by the United States of America, which had built and financed the canal's construction. From 1979 to 1999 the canal itself was under joint U.S.-Panamanian control. In 1977 the Torrijos-Carter Treaties established the neutrality of the canal. [1] 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... Map of Panama, with Panama canal The Torrijos-Carter Treaties (sometimes referred to in the singular as the Torrijos-Carter Treaty), are a pair of treaties signed by the United States and Panama in Washington, D. C. on September 7, 1977, abrogating the Hay-Bunau Varilla Treaty signed in 1903. ...


During U.S. control of the Canal Zone, the territory, apart from the canal itself, was used mainly for military purposes; however, approximately 3,000 American civilians (called "Zonians") made up the core of permanent residents. U.S. military usage ended when the zone returned to Panamanian control. It is now a tourist destination of sorts, especially for visiting cruise ships. Pacific Sky sails under Sydney Harbour Bridge A cruise ship, or less commonly cruise liner or luxury liner, is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages, where the voyage itself and the amenities of the ship are considered an essential part of the experience. ...


The Panama Canal Zone was the birthplace of John McCain, Richard Prince, and Rod Carew. John Sidney McCain III (born August 29, 1936) is an American politician. ... Richard Prince, born 1949 in the Panama Canal Zone, is a American painter and photographer. ... Carew, Time, 1977 Rodney Cline Carew (born October 1, 1945 in Gatun, Panama) was a Major League Baseball player for the Minnesota Twins and California Angels in the 1970s and 1980s. ...


Panama Canal Company

The canal was operated by the Panama Canal Company (after 1979, it was the Panama Canal Commission). The Canal Zone Government controlled the Canal Zone; kind of a cross between a colonial company enclave and a socialist government. Everyone worked for the Company or the Government in one form or another. There were no independent stores, goods were brought in and sold at a series of stores run by the company such as a commissary, house wares, and so on. The Canal Zone had its own police force, courts and judges. The head of the company was also the Governor of the Canal Zone. No one owned houses; instead they rented houses that were assigned, primarily based on seniority in the zone. When someone would leave for one reason or another, the house would be listed and employees could apply for it. The utility companies were also run by the company.


Townships

Map of the Panama Canal Zone
Map of the Panama Canal Zone

The Canal Zone was generally divided into two sections, the Pacific Side and the Atlantic Side, with Lake Gatun separating them. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (520x708, 306 KB) Map of the Panama Canal Zone. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (520x708, 306 KB) Map of the Panama Canal Zone. ...


A partial list of Canal Zone townships:

  • Pacific Side
    • Amador - on the coast, partly built on land extended into the sea using excavation materials from the canal construction
    • Ancon - built on the lower slopes of Ancon Hill, adjacent to Panama City. Also home to Gorgas Hospital.
    • Balboa - Administrative capital, as well as location of the harbor and primary Pacific Side high school
    • Balboa Heights
    • Cardenas - as the Canal Zone was gradually handed over to Panamanian control, Cardenas was one of the last Zonian holdouts.
    • Diablo
    • Diablo Heights
    • Gamboa - headquarters of dredging division, located on Lake Gatun. Many new arrivals to Canal Zone were assigned here.
    • La Boca - home of the Panama Canal College
    • Los Rios
    • Paraiso
    • Pedro Miguel
    • Red Tank - was abandoned and allowed to be overgrown sometime around 1950.
  • Atlantic Side
    • Coco Solo - main hospital
    • Cristobal - main Atlantic Side high school
    • Gatun
    • Margarita
    • Rainbow City

Ancon Hill is a steep 654-foot hill which overlooks Panama City, Panama. ... Panama City (Spanish: Ciudad de Panamá), population 708,738, is the capital of Panama, located at the Pacific entrance of the Panama Canal, at . ... A large hospital in Panama located on Ancon Hill, named for William C. Gorgas. ... Image:Balboa. ... Lake Gatún is an artificial lake situated in the Republic of Panama. ...

Postage stamps

Scott 157a--the infamous error stamp, lacking the silver ink depicting the bridge
Scott 157a--the infamous error stamp, lacking the silver ink depicting the bridge

The Canal Zone issued its own postage stamps beginning in 1904. Initially they were the current stamps of Panama or (less often) the US, overprinted with "CANAL ZONE" in various ways. Philatelists have identified over 100 varieties, some of them quite rare (and counterfeited). The last of these overprints were issued in 1939. Image File history File links Canal. ... Image File history File links Canal. ... A selection of Hong Kong postal stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... An overprint is the addition of text (and sometimes graphics) to the face of a postage stamp after it has been printed. ... Close examination of the Penny Red, left, reveals a 148 in the margin, indicating that it was printed with plate #148. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In 1928, the Zone issued a definitive series inscribed "CANAL ZONE POSTAGE" depicting various persons involved in the construction of the canal, as well as a 5 c value showing the Gaillard Cut. A series of 16 stamps in 1939 commemorating the 25th anniversary of the canal's completion showed "before" and "after" views of various points along the canal. Thereafter stamps appeared at an average rate of about two per year, with a commemorative set in some years and no stamps in others. The inscriptions were changed to just "CANAL ZONE" in the 1960s. This paralleled the abandonment of the word "POSTAGE" on many United States stamps, as the United States ceased to issue revenue stamps. 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... A definitive postage stamp is a regular issue stamp that is part of a definitive issue or definitive series consisting of a range of denominations sufficient to cover all postal rates usefully. ... The Gaillard Cut, or Culebra Cut, is a man-made valley cutting through the continental divide in Panama. ... The outrageously crowded Woodstock festival epitomized the popular antiwar movement of the 60s. ... An 1862 US 3-cent stamp used for proprietary articles A revenue stamp, tax stamp or fiscal stamp is a type of adhesive label used to collect taxes or fees on various items. ...


The most famous Canal Zone stamp was the four cent stamp (Scott #157, error stamp #157a) issued on October 12, 1962 for the opening of the Thatcher Ferry Bridge (now the Bridge of the Americas), the first elevated bridge connecting the two sides of the Canal. One pane of fifty stamps was released without the silver ink used to depict the Bridge. Upon learning of this, Canal Zone postal officials proposed to release a large quantity of intentional errors, to destroy the value of the errors. This would have paralleled what was done at almost the same time for the U.S. four cent stamp showing Dag Hammerskjold--some stamps had been issued with an inverted background, and to destroy their value, the United States Post Office Department, within a month of the original release, issued millions more. Publicity and a lawsuit by stamp dealer H.E. Harris, who was in possession of some of the errors, and claimed that the new release would effectively destroy their value prevented the release of the Canal Zone intentional errors.[2] The Bridge of the Americas (Spanish: Puente de las Américas; originally known as the Thatcher Ferry Bridge) is a road bridge in Panama, which spans the Pacific entrance to the Panama Canal. ... Dag Hjalmar Agne Carl Hammarskjöld ( ) (July 29, 1905 – September 18, 1961) was a Swedish diplomat and the second Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... The Post Office Department was the former name of the United States Postal Service when it was a cabinet department. ... Henry Ellis (H.E.) Harris (January 21, 1902 – December 29, 1977) was a leading philatelist and stamp dealer. ...


The final years of the Canal Zone saw few stamps issued--those that were issued were mainly for new first-class postal rates (the first-class rates paralleled those of the United States) The last stamp (fifteen cents) of the Zone was issued on October 25, 1978, and depicted one of the towing locomotives and a ship in a lock. Thereafter Panama took over the administration of postal service, and after a brief transition period, Canal Zone stamps became invalid. October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 67 days remaining. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ...

The Panama Canal
Overview • History • Health Measures • Panama Railway • Gaillard Cut • Gatun Dam • Chagres River • Gatun Lake • The Locks • Panamax • Bridge of the Americas • Centennial Bridge • Panama Canal Authority • The Canal Zone

  Results from FactBites:
 
Panama Canal Zone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (850 words)
In 1977 the Torrijos-Carter Treaties established the neutrality of the canal.
The Panama Canal Zone was the birthplace of John McCain, Richard Prince, and Rod Carew.
The most famous Canal Zone stamp was the four cent stamp (Scott #157, error stamp #157a) issued on October 12, 1962 for the opening of the Thatcher Ferry Bridge (now the Bridge of the Americas), the first elevated bridge connecting the two sides of the Canal.
Panama Canal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4941 words)
The Panama Canal connects the Gulf of Panama in the Pacific Ocean with the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean.
Because of the S-shape of the Isthmus of Panama the canal runs from south-east at the Pacific end to north-west at the Atlantic; to avoid confusion the canal authorities classify transits of the canal as northbound (Pacific to Atlantic) and southbound (Atlantic to Pacific).
The canal authority cites a number of major improvements, including the widening and straightening of the Gaillard Cut to reduce restrictions on crossing vessels, the deepening of the navigational channel in Gatun Lake to reduce draft restrictions and improve water supply, and the deepening of the Atlantic and Pacific Entrances of the Canal.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m