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Encyclopedia > Pan (mythology)
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Pan (Greek Πάν, genitive Πανός) is the Greek god of shepherds and flocks, of mountain wilds, hunting and rustic music: paein means to pasture. He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat, in the same manner as a faun or satyr. The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... Twelve Olympians, also known as the Dodekatheon (Greek: Δωδεκάθεον < δωδεκα, dodeka, twelve + θεον, theon, of the gods), in Greek religion, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: perhaps from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think[1]) are a number of goddesses or spirits who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing, traditional music and dance. ... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... For other uses, see Leto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... Shepherd in FăgăraÅŸ Mountains, Romania. ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... Attis wearing the Phrygian cap. ... The genitive case is a grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of possession, between the noun in the genitive case and another noun. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... A faun, as painted by Hungarian painter Pál Szinyei Merse In Roman mythology, fauns are place-spirits (genii) of untamed woodland. ... A bald, bearded, horse-tailed satyr balances a winecup on his erect penis, a trick worthy of note, on an Attic red-figured psykter, ca. ...

Pan teaching his eromenos, the shepherd Daphnis, to play the panpipes
2nd c. AD Roman copy of Greek original
ca. 100 BC attributed to Heliodorus
Found in Pompeii

Contents

Download high resolution version (388x769, 31 KB)Pan and Daphnis This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (388x769, 31 KB)Pan and Daphnis This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... In the pederastic tradition of Classical Athens, the eromenos (Greek ἐρόμενος, pl. ... Sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes; ca. ... For other uses, see Pompeii (disambiguation). ...

Origins

The parentage of Pan is unclear; in some myths he is the son of Zeus, though generally he is the son of Hermes, with whom his mother is said to be a nymph, sometimes Dryope or, in Nonnus, Dioysiaca (14.92), a Penelope of Mantineia in Arcadia.[1] His nature and name are alluring, particularly since often his name is mistakenly thought to be identical to the Greek word pan, meaning "all", when in fact the name of the god is derived from the word pa-on, which means "herdsman" and shares its prefix with the modern English word "pasture". In many ways he seems to be identical to Protogonus/Phanes. The word mythology (from the Greek μυολογία mythología, from mythologein to relate myths, from mythos, meaning a narrative, and logos, meaning speech or argument) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use the supernatural to interpret natural events and... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... In Greek mythology, Dryope[1] was the daughter of Dryops (oak-man) or of Eurytus (and hence half-sister to Iole). ... The Greek epic poet Nonnus (Greek Nonnos), a native of Panopolis (Akhmim) in the Egyptian Thebaid, probably lived at the end of the 4th or the beginning of the 5th century AD. He produced the Dionysiaca, an epic tale of the god Dionysus, a paraphrase of the Gospel of John... Mantinea – Greek: Mαντινεία Mantineia, modern romanizations: Mantinia, Mandineia or Mandinia; and for a time Antigonia (Greek: Αντιγόνεια) also transliterated as Antigonea and Antigoneia – is a city in Arcadia in the central Peloponnese that was the site of two significant battles in Classical Greek history. ... This article is about the Greek god Eros. ... In Greek mythology, Phanes (light) or Protogonus (first-born) was the primeval deity of procreation and the generation of new life; his other names included Ericapaeus (power) and Metis (thought). He is often equated with Eros and Mithras and has been depicted as a hermaphroditic deity emerging from a cosmic...


A modern account of several purported meetings with Pan is given by R. Ogilvie Crombie (born Edinburgh, lived 1899-1975), in the books "The Findhorn Garden" (Harper & Row, 1975) and "The Magic Of Findhorn" (Harper & Row, 1975). Crombie claimed to have met Pan many times at various locations including Edinburgh, on the island of Iona and at the Findhorn Foundation, all in Scotland. For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... Iona is a small island, in the Inner Hebrides, Scotland. ... The Findhorn Foundation is a Scottish charitable trust registered in 1972 to act as a focal point for the work of the community that grew up around Eileen and Peter Caddy and Dorothy Maclean near Findhorn, Scotland, from 1962 onwards. ... This article is about the country. ...


Faunus

Main article: Faunus

In Roman mythology, Pan's counterpart was Faunus, a nature spirit who was the father of Bona Dea (Fauna, his feminine side) Marble sculpture of Pan copulating with a goat, recovered from Herculaneum Pan (Greek &#928;&#945;&#957;, genitive &#928;&#945;&#957;&#959;&#962;) is the Greek god who watches over shepherds and their flocks. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... Marble sculpture of Pan copulating with a goat, recovered from Herculaneum Pan (Greek &#928;&#945;&#957;, genitive &#928;&#945;&#957;&#959;&#962;) is the Greek god who watches over shepherds and their flocks. ... In Roman mythology, Bona Dea (the good goddess) was a goddess of fertility, healing, virginity and women. ... Fauna is an alternate name for Bona Dea, Ops, Terra and Tellus, ancient Roman goddesses. ...


Pan in fiction and literature

[The Mole] saw the backward sweep of the curved horns, gleaming in the growing daylight; saw the stern, hooked nose between the kindly eyes that were looking down on them humourously, while the bearded mouth broke into a half-smile at the corners; saw the rippling muscles on the arm that lay across the broad chest, the long supple hand still holding the pan-pipes only just fallen away from the parted lips; saw the splendid curves of the shaggy limbs disposed in majestic ease on the sward...
  • Pan was the inspiration for the Progressive Rock Band: Pans Motive.
  • Pan makes an appearance in the computer game Freedom Force as a villain. His flute has the power to hypnotize people.
  • Pan appears as the embodiment of lust in the 1963 movie "7 Faces of Dr. Lao".
  • Gravity's Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
  • "Pan, God of the Forest" by Roberto Malini, Book. Published by Edizioni dell'Ambrosino, Italy.
  • "A Musical Instrument" by Elizabeth Barrett Browning
  • Animal Collective have a song entitled "I See You Pan" on their release Hollinndagain.
  • Pan makes a guest appearance in The Circus of Dr. Lao by Charles G. Finney and John Marco, and is the primary, metaphorical theme in Knut Hamsun's Pan, and in Shepherds of Pan on the Big Sur-Monterey Coast by Elayne Wareing Fitzpatrick. Pan also features in Donna Jo Napoli's young adult novel of the same title.
  • Appears in the book "Greenmantle" (1988) by Charles de Lint
  • Grover searches for Pan in the Percy Jackson series
  • Pan makes an appearance in Disney's "Duck Tales."
  • Appears in the book "Cloven Hooves" by Megan Lindholm (1991)
  • George Pérez's first Wonder Woman story shows a duplicitous Pan tricking Princess Diana. He fools everyone, including Hermes, who is horrified when informed of Pan's death after he has been shown an image of Pan's horned skull in the dirt and vows revenge.
  • The faun in the movie Pan's Labyrinth (Spanish title: El Laberinto del Fauno, 2006) is not Pan but bears physical similarities. This is verified in the second disc of the DVD set by the director, Guillermo del Toro.
  • A meeting with Pan, presented as fact, is included in the chapter "ROC", written by R. Ogilvie Crombie, in the book "The Findhorn Garden" (1975). This account is also related in the book "The Magic Of Findhorn" by Paul Hawken(1975).
  • Pan makes an appearance in Touched by the Gods by Lawrence Watt-Evans.
  • Pan is an antagonist in the Roleplaying Game Scion, by White Wolf Inc.

The Great God Pan was a novella written by Arthur Machen. ... Arthur Machen (March 3, 1863 – December 15th, 1947) was a leading Welsh-born author of the 1890s. ... Best known as Lord Dunsany, Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, 18th Baron of Dunsany (July 24, 1878–October 25, 1957) was an Irish writer and dramatist notable for his work in fantasy and horror. ... Violet Mary Firth Evans, born Violet Mary Firth (December 6, 1890[1] - 1946) and better known as Dion Fortune, was a British occultist and author[2]. Her pseudonym was inspired by her family motto Deo, non fortuna (Latin for God, not fate)[3]. // She was born at Bryn-y-Bia... Algernon Henry Blackwood (March 14, 1869 – December 10, 1951) was an English writer of tales of the supernatural. ... Edgar Alfred Jepson (1863 - 1938) was an English writer, principally of mainstream adventure and detective fiction, but also of some supernatural and fantasy stories that are better remembered. ... Jitterbug Perfume is Tom Robbins fourth novel, published in 1984. ... Tom Robbins at a reading of Wild Ducks Flying Backward in San Francisco on September 24, 2005 Thomas Eugene Robbins (born July 22, 1936 in Blowing Rock, North Carolina) is an American author. ... Donna Jo Napoli is an author of childrens and young adult books, as well as a prominent linguist with work in syntax, phonetics, phonology, morphology, historical and comparative linguistics, Romance studies, structure of Japanese, structure of American Sign Language, poetics, writing for ESL students, and mathematical and linguistic analysis... Mordicai Gerstein is an American artist, writer, and film director, best known for illustrating and writing childrens books. ... William Butler Yeats, 1933. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... The Lawnmower Man is a short story by Stephen King, first published in Cavalier in 1975. ... Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of over 200 stories including over 50 bestselling horror novels. ... Agatha Mary Clarissa, Lady Mallowan, DBE (15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976), mainly known as Agatha Christie, was an English crime fiction writer. ... Clash of the Titans is a 1981 fantasy movie based on the myth of the Perseus. ... For the play by Sheridan, see The Critic (play). ... The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, created by Maxwell Atoms, is an American animated television series that currently airs on Cartoon Network and Teletoon. ... The Magic Barrel is a collection of short stories written by Bernard Malamud in 1958. ... Bernard Malamud (April 26, 1914 – March 18, 1986) was an American writer. ... Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... The Waterboys are a band formed in 1983 by Mike Scott. ... There are several well-known people named Mike Scott: Mike Scott (musician), the founder and chief songwriter of the rock band The Waterboys Mike Scott (baseball), a former Major League Baseball pitcher best known for his time with the Houston Astros in the 1980s Mike Scott (fanzine), a Hugo Award... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cosmo Jay Fairyhopper and Wanda Venus Fairywinkle are fictional characters who are the title characters in the Nickelodeon animated television series The Fairly OddParents. ... The Fairly OddParents is one of the most popular cartoons on Nickelodeon The Fairly OddParents is an animated series created by Butch Hartman and was first aired in March 30, 2001. ... Knut Hamsun (31 years old) in 1890 Knut Hamsun (August 4, 1859 – February 19, 1952) was a leading Norwegian author and recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature for 1920. ... Ratty and Mole, as interpreted by E. H. Shepard The Wind in the Willows is a classic of childrens literature written in 1908 by Kenneth Grahame. ... Kenneth Grahame Kenneth Grahame (March 8, 1859 – July 6, 1932) was a Scottish novelist. ... Freedom Force is a computer game developed by Irrational Games and published by Electronic Arts in 2002. ... Elizabeth Barrett Browning (March 6, 1806 – June 29, 1861) was one of the most respected poets of the Victorian era. ... The Circus of Dr. Lao is a 1935 novel written by Arizona newspaperman Charles G. Finney, and illustrated by Boris Artzybasheff. ... Charles G. Finney (December 1, 1905 – April 16, 1984) was an American newspaperman, story writer, and fantastical novelist, and part time night club owner, whose full name was Charles Grandison Finney, evidently in honor of the famous evangelist. ... John Marco is an American author of fantasy fiction. ... Knut Hamsun (31 years old) in 1890 Knut Hamsun (August 4, 1859 – February 19, 1952) was a leading Norwegian author and recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature for 1920. ... Donna Jo Napoli is an author of childrens and young adult books, as well as a prominent linguist with work in syntax, phonetics, phonology, morphology, historical and comparative linguistics, Romance studies, structure of Japanese, structure of American Sign Language, poetics, writing for ESL students, and mathematical and linguistic analysis... Greenmantle is the second of five Richard Hannay novels by John Buchan, first published in 1916 by Hodder & Stoughton, London. ... Charles de Lint (born December 22, 1951) is a Canadian fantasy author and Celtic folk musician. ... New Teen Titans #1. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Pans Labyrinth (Spanish: El Laberinto del Fauno; literally The Labyrinth of the Faun) is an Academy Award-winning Spanish language fantasy film[2][3] written and directed by Mexican film-maker Guillermo del Toro. ... Guillermo del Toro (born October 9, 1964 in Guadalajara, Jalisco) is an Academy Award-nominated Mexican film director. ... Paul Hawken is an environmentalist, entrepreneur, journalist, and best-selling author. ... This article is on the car division of Toyota. ...

Notes

  1. ^ This is not the Penelope who was the wife of Odysseus.

The Vatican Penelope: a Roman marble copy of an Early Classical 6th-century Greek work (Vatican Museums) For other uses, see Penelope (disambiguation). ...

References

  • Burkert, Walter (1985). Greek Religion. Harvard University Press. 
  • Kerenyi, Karl (1951). The Gods of the Greeks. Thames & Hudson. 
  • Ruck, Carl A.P.; Danny Staples (1994). The World of Classical Myth. Carolina Academic Press. ISBN 0-89089-575-9. 
  • Borgeaud, Philippe (1979). Recherches sur le Dieu Pan. Geneva University. 
  • Vinci, Leo (1993), Pan: Great God Of Nature, Neptune Press, London

Walter Burkert (born Neuendettelsau (Bavaria), February 2, 1931), the most eminent living scholar of Greek myth and cult, is an emeritus professor of classics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland who has also taught in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... One of the founders of modern studies in Greek mythology, Karl (Carl, Károly) Kerényi (January 19, 1897 - April 14, 1973) was born in Hungary but became a citizen of Switzerland in 1943. ...

See also

It has been suggested that Puck (Shakespeare) be merged into this article or section. ... Ancient Pompeii was full of erotic or pornographic frescoes, symbols, inscriptions, and even household items. ... A faun, as painted by Hungarian painter Pál Szinyei Merse In Roman mythology, fauns are place-spirits (genii) of untamed woodland. ... A bald, bearded, horse-tailed satyr balances a winecup on his erect penis, a trick worthy of note, on an Attic red-figured psykter, ca. ... Kokopelli is a fertility deity, usually depicted as a humpbacked flute player (often with a huge phallus and antenna-like protrusions on his head), who has been venerated by many Native American cultures in the Southwestern United States. ... Davelis Cave is a well-known cave in Penteli, a mountain to the north of Athens, Greece. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Pan (mythology)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pan, Greek Mythology Link - www.maicar.com (950 words)
When Pan was born and the nurse saw the face and the beard of the newborn child, she was afraid and fled.
Pan and Daphnis 4, the inventor of the bucolic poem
Eupheme 1 is one of Zeus' NURSES and the nurse of the MUSES.
Pan (mythology) (735 words)
Pan (Greek &Pi;αν, genitive Πανο&sigmaf;, said to be related to the Greek word for "all" or "everything") is the Greek god who watches over shepherds and their flocks.
Pan is famous for his sexual prowess, and is often depicted with an erect priapus.
Pan blew on his pipes, and with his rustic melody gave great satisfaction to himself and his faithful follower, Midas, who happened to be present.
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