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Encyclopedia > Palestinian Christian
Palestinians
Israeli-Palestinian conflict

Balfour Declaration
1936-1939 Arab revolt in Palestine
Partition · British Mandate
Transjordan · Israel
Palestinian exodus
Jordanian control (West Bank)
Egyptian control (Gaza Strip)
1st Intifada · Oslo Accords
· Hafrada (Separation) · Israeli Gaza Strip barrier
2nd Intifada · Israeli West Bank barrier ·
Israel's unilateral disengagement plan
Timeline
See also Template:Arab citizens of Israel
The term Palestine and the related term Palestinian have several overlapping (and occasionally contradictory) definitions. ... Israel, with the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Golan Heights The Israeli-Palestinian conflict, which is often claimed to be at the heart of the Arab-Israeli conflict, is an ongoing dispute between two peoples, Jewish Israelis and Arab Palestinians, that both claim the right to sovereignty over the Land... The Balfour Declaration was a letter dated November 2, 1917 from the British Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour, to Lord Rothschild (Walter Rothschild, 2nd Baron Rothschild), a leader of the British Jewish community, for transmission to the Zionist Federation, a private Zionist organization. ... The 1936-1939 Arab revolt in Palestine was an uprising during the British mandate by Palestinian Arabs in Palestine which lasted from 1936 to 1939. ... On 29 November 1947 the United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine or United Nations General Assembly Resolution 181, a plan to resolve the Arab-Israeli conflict in the British Mandate of Palestine, was approved by the United Nations General Assembly. ... Flag Palestine and Transjordan were incorporated (under different legal and administrative arrangements) into the British Mandate of Palestine, issued by the League of Nations to Great Britain on 29 September, 1923 Capital Not specified Organizational structure League of Nations Mandate High Commissioner  - 1920 — 1925 Sir Herbert Louis Samuel  - 1945 — 1948... Map of the territory of the British Mandate of Palestine The Emirate of Transjordan was an autonomous political division of the British Mandate of Palestine, created as an administrative entity in April 1921 before the Mandate came into effect. ... Palestinian refugees in 1948 The Palestinian exodus (Arabic: الهجرة الفلسطينية al-Hijra al-Filasteeniya) refers to the refugee flight of Palestinian Arabs during the 1948 Arab-Israeli war. ... Map of the West Bank today Rule of the West Bank and East Jerusalem by Jordan. ... Map of the Gaza Strip from The World Factbook. ... The First Intifada, or Palestinian uprising refers to a series of violent incidents between Palestinians and Israelis between 1987 and approximately 1990. ... Yitzhak Rabin, Bill Clinton, and Yasser Arafat during the Oslo Accords on September 13, 1993. ... Hafrada (Hebrew: ) is the English transliteration of the Hebrew word for separation. ... Gaza Strip Barrier near the Karni Crossing The Israeli Gaza Strip barrier is a separation barrier along the armistice line of the 1948 Arab-Israeli War between the Gaza Strip and Israel. ... For other uses, see al-Aqsa (disambiguation). ... The barrier route as of May 2005. ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (termed in Hebrew: תוכנית ההתנתקות Tokhnit HaHitnatkut or תכנית ההינתקות Tokhnit HaHinatkut in the Disengagement Plan Implementation Law), also known as the disengagement plan, Gaza Pull-Out plan, and Hitnatkut) was a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, adopted by the government and enacted in August 2005, to... This is an incomplete timeline of events in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ...

Palestinian National Authority

Geography of the West Bank · Geography of the Gaza Strip
Palestinian territories
List of Arab localities in Palestine 1948
West Bank · Gaza Strip
Districts · Cities · East Jerusalem
Refugee camps
Biodiversity Anthem: Biladi Capital Ramallah and Gaza de facto, as the current location of government institutions. ... Geography of the West Bank Location: Middle East, west of Jordan Geographic coordinates: 32 00 N, 35 15 E Map references: Middle East Area: total: 5,860 km² land: 5,640 km² water: 220 km² note: includes West Bank, Latrun Salient, and the northwest quarter of the Dead Sea, but... Map of the Gaza Strip from The World Factbook. ... This article is about the Palestinian territories as a geopolitical phenomenon. ... District of Acre Acre Amqa Arab al-Samniyya al-Bassa al-Birwa al-Damun Dayr al-Qassi al-Ghabisiyya Iqrit Iribbin, Khirbat Jiddin, Khirbat al-Kabri Kafr Inan Kuwaykat al-Manshiyya al-Mansura Miar al-Nabi Rubin Nahf al-Nahr al-Ruways Sakhnin Shaab Suhmata al-Sumayriyya Suruh... The 16 Governorates of the West Bank and Gaza Strip are divided into 16 districts (Aqdya, singular - qadaa). ... Map of the West Bank Map of Gaza Strip This is a list of cities and towns in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, the two territories that make up the Palestinian territories. ... East Jerusalem is that part of Jerusalem which was held by Jordan from the 1948 Arab-Israeli War until the Six-Day War in 1967. ... List of Palestinian refugee camps with current population and year they were established: Gaza, 8 camps, 478,854 refugees 1948, Beach camp (Shati), 76,109 1949, Bureij, 30,059 1948, Deir el-Balah, 20,188 1948, Jabalia (Jabalyia, Abalyia), 103,646 1949, Khan Yunis, 60,662 1949, Maghazi, 22,536... This article is about the fauna and flora in the geographical region of Israel and the Disputed Territories (the West Bank and Gaza Strip). ...

Politics

PLO · PNA · PNC · PLO EC · PLC
Political Parties
Hamas · Fatah
National Covenant · Foreign Relations
... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic: ‎;   or Munazzamat al-Tahrir al-Filastiniyyah) is a political and paramilitary organization regarded by the Arab League since October 1974 as the sole legitimate representative of the Palestinian people. ... Anthem: Biladi Capital Ramallah and Gaza de facto, as the current location of government institutions. ... The Palestinian National Council (PNC) is the parliament in exile of the Palestinian people. ... The Executive Committee (PLO EC) is the highest executive body of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO). ... The Palestinian Legislative Council, (sometimes referred to to as the Palestinan Parliament) the legislature of the Palestinian Authority, is a unicameral body with 88 members, elected from 16 electoral districts in the West Bank and Gaza. ... A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues with the aim to participate in power, usually by participating in elections. ... Hamas (Arabic: ; acronym: Arabic: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement; the Arabic acronym means zeal) is a Palestinian Islamist organization that currently (since January 2006) forms the majority party of the Palestinian National Authority. ... Fatah (Arabic: ); a reverse acronym from the Arabic name Harakat al-Tahrir al-Watani al-Filastini (literally: Palestinian National Liberation Movement) is a major secular Palestinian political party and the largest organization in the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), a generally secular multi-party confederation. ... The Palestinian National Covenant or Palestinian National Charter (Arabic: al-Mithaq al-Watani al-Filastini) is the charter or constitution of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO). ... The Palestinian Declaration of Independence, led to Palestines recognition by 93 countries and to the renaming of the PLO mission in the UN to Palestine. After the formation of the Palestinian Authority, many countries exchanged embassies and delegations with it. ...

Demographics

Demographics of the West Bank
People
The Palestinian territories, occupied — according to the United Nations terminology — since the 1967 Six-Day War, include the West Bank and the Gaza strip. ... See also: Demographics of Israel, demographics section in Gaza strip Population: 2,020,298 note: in addition, there are some 171,000 Israeli settlers in the West Bank and about 172,000 in East Jerusalem (July 2000 est. ...

Economy

Economy of the West Bank
Economy - overview: Economic conditions in the West Bank - where economic activity is governed by the Paris Economic Protocol of April 1994 between Israel and the Palestinian Authority - have deteriorated since the early 1990s. ...

Religion & religious sites

Palestinian Jew · Palestinian Christian
Druze · Sunni Muslim
Al-Aqsa Mosque · Dome of the Rock
Church of the Nativity · Rachel's Tomb
Church of the Holy Sepulchre
See also Template:History of the Levant
Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... A Palestinian Jew is a Jewish inhabitant of Palestine throughout certain periods of Middle East history. ... Druze star The Druze (Arabic: درزي, derzÄ« or durzÄ«, plural دروز, durÅ«z; Hebrew: , Druzim; also transliterated Druz or Druse) are a Middle Eastern religious community whose traditional religion stemmed primarily from an offshoot of an Islamic sect, but is unique in its incorporation of Gnostic, neo-Platonic and other philosophies. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... For other uses, see Al-aqsa (disambiguation). ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... View of The Church of the Nativity from Manger Square The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem is one of the oldest continuously operating churches in the world. ... Rachels Tomb is a holy site of high significance to Judaism and is located in Northern Judea (Southern West Bank) just outside of the Jerusalem neighborhood of Gilo at the northern entrance to Bethlehem along what was once the Biblical Bethlehem-Ephrath road. ... Main Entrance to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. ...

Culture

Music · Dance · Arab cuisine
Palestinian Arabic
Palestinian flag Palestinian culture is most closely related to the cultures of the nearby Levantine countries such as Lebanon, Syria, and Jordan and of the Arab World. ... In the areas now controlled by Israel and Palestinian National Authority, multiple ethnic groups, races and religions have long held on to a diverse culture. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Arab cuisine is the cuisine of the Arab countries. ... Palestinian Arabic is a Levantine Arabic dialect subgroup. ...

Notable personalities

Rashid Khalidi · Rim Banna
Edward Said · Emile Habibi · Hanan Ashrawi
Ghassan Kanafani · Qustandi Shomali
Ghada Karmi· Mahmoud Darwish ·
Samih al-Qasim · Nathalie Handal ·
Khalil al-Sakakini · Elia Suleiman ·
Hany Abu-Assad · May Ziade ·
Mohammad Amin al-Husayni
The following is a list of prominent Palestinians, both from Palestine and from the Palestinian diaspora. ... Rashid Khalidi (1950 - ) is the Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies at Columbia University, and the head of Columbias Middle East Institute. ... Rim Banna is a Palestinian singer, composer and arranger, well-known for her modern interpretations of traditional folk songs. ... Edward Wadie Said (Arabic: , transliteration: ) (1 November 1935 – 25 September 2003) was a Palestinian-American literary theorist and outspoken Palestinian activist. ... Emile Habibi (August, 1921 - May 3, 1996) was a Palestinian-Israeli writer and politician. ... Hanan Ashrawi Dr. Hanan Daoud Khalil Ashrawi (born 8 October 1946 in Ramallah, British Mandate of Palestine) is a Palestinian Anglican scholar and political activist. ... Ghassan Kanafani Ghassan Kanafani (غسان كنفاني, born April 9, 1936 in Acre, Palestine - died July 8, 1972 in Beirut, Lebanon) was a Palestinian writer and a spokesman for the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. ... Qustandi Shomali Born in Beit Sahour on 8 July 1946, worked as an Arabic teacher in Algeria from 1965-72; received a B.A in Arabic Literature from Oran University in Algeria in 1971, worked as editor of the Arab World Review in Canada from 1972 to 1975 and as... —Ghada Karmi (1939- ) (Arabic: ‎) is a Palestinian doctor of medicine, author and academic. ... Mahmoud Darwish Mahmoud Darwish (born 1941 in Al-Birwah, British mandate of Palestine) is a contemporary Palestinian poet and writer of prose. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Nathalie Handal (born July 29, 1969) is a Palestinian poet, writer and playwright and a literary researcher. ... Khalil Sakakini Khalil al-Sakakini (خليل السكاكيني) (January 23, 1878 - August 13, 1953) was a distinguished Palestinian Jerusalemite educator, scholar, and poet. ... Elia Suleiman (born July 28, 1960 in Nazareth) is a Palestinian film director and actor. ... Hany Abu-Assad (Arabic: ‎, born 11 October 1961) is a Dutch-Palestinian film director. ... May Ziade (1886 - 1941) was born in Palestine (of the Ottoman Empire) in 1886. ... Mohammad Amin al-Husayni Mohammad Amin al-Husayni (ca. ...

Portal:Palestine

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The Palestinian Christians are Palestinians who follow Christianity. Aggregate figures on the number of Palestinian Christians today are estimates, due to the difficulty in collecting comprehensive information on the different Diaspora populations. The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... The term: diaspora (in Greek, διασπορά – a scattering or sowing of seeds) is used (without capitalization) to refer to any people or ethnic population forced or induced to leave their traditional ethnic homelands; being dispersed throughout other parts of the world, and the ensuing developments in their dispersal and culture. ...


According to the census data collected by the Ottoman Empire, the Christian population in 1914 was 24% of what we could call today Israel/Palestine, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, and Turkey; today it is no more than 5%. [1] In British Mandate Palestine, Christians made up as much as 20% of the population, though some put the figure at 13%.[1] Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–22 Mehmed VI... The Holy Land or Palestine Showing not only the Old Kingdoms of Judea and Israel but also the 12 Tribes Distinctly, and Confirming Even the Diversity of the Locations of their Ancient Positions and Doing So as the Holy Scriptures Indicate, a geographic map from the studio of Tobiae Conradi... Flag The approximate borders of the British Mandate circa 1922. ...


Today, the majority of Palestinian Christians live in the Diaspora. It is known that Christians make up between 40,000 and 90,000 people (1.1 to 2.4%) of the population of the Palestinian territories. Most are in the West Bank, though there is a community of 2,000 in the Gaza Strip. The related Arab Christians in Israel number between 144,000 and 196,000 (2.1 to 2.8%) of the total population,[2] and about 8.8% of the non-Jewish Arab population.[3] This article is about the Palestinian territories as a geopolitical phenomenon. ... Arab Christians are people who are ethnically Arab or culturally and linguistically Arabized and who follow the religion of Christianity. ...


The majority of Palestinian Christians belong to the Greek Orthodox Church of Jerusalem, one of the 16 churches of Eastern Orthodoxy. There are also Maronites, Melkites, Jacobites, Roman Catholics, Syrian Catholics, Copts and Protestants among them. The Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem, Theofilos III, is the leader of Palestinian Orthodox Christians (Greek Orthodox). The Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem, Michel Sabah, is the leader of the Palestinian Roman Catholics. The Anglican Bishop of Jerusalem is Riah Abu Assal. The Bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jerusalem and Jordan is Dr. Munib Younan. Elias Chacour of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church is Archbishop of Galilee. The Orthodox Church of Jerusalem, properly called the Greek Orthodox Church of Jerusalem, is regarded by Orthodox Christians as the mother church of all of Christendom, because it was in Jerusalem that the Church was established on the day of Pentecost with the descent of the Holy Spirit on the... ... Maronites (Marunoye ܡܪܘܢܝܐܶ; in Syriac, Mâruniyya مارونية in Arabic) are members of an Eastern Catholic Church in full communion with the Pope of Rome. ... The term Melkite (also written Melchite) is used to refer to various Christian churches and their members originating in the Middle East. ... The Syriac Orthodox Church is an autocephalous Oriental Orthodox church based in the Middle East with members spread throughout the world. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Syrian Catholic Church is a Christian church in the Levant in full communion with the pope having practices and rite in common with the Jacobites. ... Jesus Christ in a Coptic icon. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem is the head bishop of the Orthodox Church of Jerusalem, ranking fourth of nine patriarchs in the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Patr. ... Greek Orthodox Church can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches: the Orthodox Church of Constantinople, headed by the Patriarch of Constantinople, who is also the first among equals of the Eastern Orthodox Communion. ... The Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem is the title given to the Latin Rite Roman Catholic Archbishop of Jerusalem. ... Michel Sabah (born March 19, 1933) has been the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem and Archbishop of Jerusalem since 1987. ... The post of Anglican Bishop of Jerusalem was created at the end of the 1800s when the Anglicans and German Lutherans agreed to have a Protestant bishop who would, alternately, be appointed by each community. ... Riah Hanna Abu El-Assal (b. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church or ELC was formed in 1917 as the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America or NLCA The NLCA was formed by merger of the Hauge Synod (est. ... Munib Younan is the Evangelical Lutheran Church Bishop of Palestine and Jordan. ... Abuna Elias Chaccour Abuna Elias Chaccour (born 1939) is a Palestinian born, Israeli archbishop, currently the Archbishop of Galilee of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church, an Eastern Byzantine Rite Church in communion with Rome (Abuna, Arabic for Our Father, is the affectionate and respectful term given by Arab Christians to... The Melkite Greek Catholic Church (Arabic: ‎, ) is an Eastern Rite sui juris particular Church of the Catholic Church in communion with the Pope. ... Galilee (Arabic al-jaleel الجليل, Hebrew hagalil הגליל), meaning circuit, is a large area overlapping with much of the North District of Israel. ...


Estimates of the number of Arab Christians vary. Christians today make up 9.2% of the population of the Near East. In Lebanon they now number around 39% of the population, in Syria about 10 to 15%. In Palestinian before the creation of Israel estimates range up to as much as 40%, but mass emigration has slashed the number still present to 3.8%. Israel Arab Christians constitute 2.1% (or roughly 10% of the Israeli Arab population). In Egypt, they constitute about 6% of the population. Around two-thirds of North and South American and Australian Arabs are Christian, particularly from Syria, the Palestinian territories, and Lebanon. Arab Christians are people who are ethnically Arab or culturally and linguistically Arabized and who follow the religion of Christianity. ...


Most Palestinian Christians see themselves as Arab Christians, although some, echoing similar narratives in the Lebanese Maronite community, reject this label and claim to be descended from people who were present before the coming of the Arabs, or from Europeans who came to the region during the medieval Crusades. In reality, they are most likely a mixture of Armenians, Byzantine, pre-Islamic Arabs (Ghassanids), and Crusaders.[citation needed]The region called Palestine or Israel is considered the Holy Land by Christians, and major Christian holy cities like Bethlehem and Nazareth are located in the Palestinian Autonomy and Israel, respectively. Arab Christians are people who are ethnically Arab or culturally and linguistically Arabized and who follow the religion of Christianity. ... Maronites (Marunoye ܡܪܘܢܝܶܐ in Syriac, Mawarinah in Arabic) are members of one of the Eastern Rites of the Catholic church. ... Languages Arabic other minority languages Religions Predomiantly Sunni Islam, as well as Shia Islam, Greek Orthodoxy, Greek Catholicism, Maronite, Alawite Islam, Druze, Ibadi Islam, and Judaism An Arab (Arabic: ) is any member of the Semitic group of people whose cultural, linguistic, and in certain cases, ancestral origins trace back to... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... The Ghassanids were Arab Christians that emigrated in 250 CE from Yemen to the Hauran, in southern Syria. ... The Crusaders (formerly the Canterbury Crusaders) are a New Zealand Rugby Union team based in Christchurch, New Zealand that competes in the Super 14 (formerly the Super 12). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Holy Land (Biblical). ... Central Bethlehem Bethlehem (Arabic بيت لحم   house of meat; Standard Hebrew בית לחם house of bread, Bet léḥem / Bet láḥem; Tiberian Hebrew Bêṯ léḥem / Bêṯ lāḥem; Greek: Βηθλεέμ) is a city in the Bethlehem Governorate of the West Bank under Palestinian Authority considered a central hub of Palestinian cultural and tourism... Nazareth (IPA: ) (Arabic الناصرة an-Nāṣira lit. ...


During the Ottoman period, the number of Christians approached 30%. Emigration to the predominantly Christian-populated areas of neighboring Lebanon, as well as South America drastically reduced the number of Christians by the beginning of the twentieth century. Prior to the independence of the state of Israel, approximately 10% of Palestine's (excluding Transjordan) Arab population was Christian. This is reflected in the large number of prominent Palestinians that are Christian, including Hanan Ashrawi, Emile Habibi, Edward Said, Elia Suleiman, Hany Abu Assad, Azmi Bishara, Anis Shorrosh, George Habash, Nayef Hawatmeh, Rifat Odeh Kassis and activist Raymonda Tawil, who is also the mother of Yassir Arafat's wife Suha.[4] The current Palestinian Ambassador to the United States, Afif Saffieh, is also from a Christian family. However, the Christians were also often found in the more affluent segments of Palestinian society that fled or were expelled from the country during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War; in West Jerusalem, over 50% of Christians lost their homes to the advancing Israeli army, according to the historian Sami Haddad. [5] Map of the territory of the British Mandate of Palestine The Emirate of Transjordan was an autonomous political division of the British Mandate of Palestine, created as an administrative entity in April 1921 before the Mandate came into effect. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Hanan Ashrawi Dr. Hanan Daoud Khalil Ashrawi (born 8 October 1946 in Ramallah, British Mandate of Palestine) is a Palestinian Anglican scholar and political activist. ... Emile Habibi (August, 1921 - May 3, 1996) was a Palestinian-Israeli writer and politician. ... Edward Wadie Said (Arabic: , transliteration: ) (1 November 1935 – 25 September 2003) was a Palestinian-American literary theorist and outspoken Palestinian activist. ... Elia Suleiman (born July 28, 1960 in Nazareth) is a Palestinian film director and actor. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... George Habash (Arabic جورج حبش) (born August 2, 1926 in Lod), sometimes known by his nom de guerre Al-Hakim, الحكيم, meaning the doctor, is a Palestinian politician, formerly a militant, and the founder and former Secretary-General of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. ... Naif Hawatmeh Nayef Hawatmeh (kunya Abu an-Nuf, b. ... Rifat Odeh Kassis (Arabic: ‎) is a Palestinian Christian was born in Beit Sahour/ Palestine. ... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسي&#1606... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Afif Safieh (born 4 May 1950) is a Palestinian diplomat. ... Combatants  Israel Egypt, Syria, Transjordan,  Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Holy War Army, Arab Liberation Army Commanders Yaakov Dori, Yigael Yadin Glubb Pasha, Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni, Hasan Salama, Fawzi Al-Qawuqji Strength  Israel: 29,677 initially rising to 115,000 by March 1949 Egypt: 10,000 initially rising... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ...


Over the years, a considerable numbers of Christians have emigrated, mainly to Latin America, the United States, and Canada. The difference between Christians' and Muslims' rate of emigration may be explained in various ways, but one likely factor is that Christian emigrants find it easier to be accepted in historically Christian Western countries than do Muslim emigrants.


Other reasons for the disparity are are hotly contested. Some Christians currently in Palestine claim their lives are made difficult due to the Israeli occupation and make few complaints about their Muslim neighbours. On the other hand, others blame extremist Muslim elements among Palestinian Muslims, and state that they feel threatened or pressured to conform with that agenda as reasons for emigrating.[6] The phrase Islamic fundamentalism is primarily used in the West to describe Islamist groups. ...


The Daily Telegraph [7] speaks of an 'Islamic mafia' that has conducted a series of attacks on the Palestinian Christian community, particularily in the form of land thefts. Some observers claim that this represents a pattern of deliberate mistreatment by the Palestinian Authority; others hold that these are isolated incidents that are more to do with personal differences and do not reflect the ways of society in general. The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ...


In a 2006 poll of Palestinian Christians in Bethlehem, 90% reported having Muslim friends, 73.3% agreed that the Palestinian Authority treats Christian heritage in the city with respect and 78% attributed the ongoing exodus of Christians from Bethlehem to the Israeli blockade on the town [8]. Two American courts, one in Illinois and the other in North Carolina, have accepted the threat of "religious persecution" as grounds for granting asylum to two Evangelical converts from Islam fleeing PA territory [9], although it is not clear if their reason for fleeing was solely due to the fact that they are converts. Palestinian Christians are generally sympathetic of the Palestinian cause, but often feel threatened by the heavy role of Islamic militancy in the struggle[citation needed]. Palestinian Christians have a higher rate of education and a lower birth rate than their Muslim counterparts. According to the BBC, some Palestinian Christians have spoken of threats, confiscation of land, difficulties buying land, arson attacks, sexual assaults and general hostility. [10][11] However, the few Christians who speak privately of harassment, seizure of Christian land are only a fraction of those who risk speaking out against radical groups. In Ramallah, the Bible Society Building torched. As of 2005, the only public Christian library in Gaza had been set on fire twice. A detailed study published in November 2005 by Israeli judge Justus Reid Weiner reported extortion, rapes, forced marriages, heavy discrimination and, in the case of one Muslim convert to Christianity, murder.[citation needed] Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Look up Persecution in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Power lines leading to a trash dump hover just overhead in El Carpio, a Nicaraguan refugee camp in Costa Rica Under international law, a refugee is a person who is outside his/her country of nationality or habitual residence; has a well-founded fear of persecution because of his/her... The word evangelicalism usually refers to a broad collection of religious beliefs, practices, and traditions which are found among conservative Protestant Christians. ... In general, conversion is the transformation of one thing into another. ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion (US$7. ... Ramallah (Arabic:  ) is a Palestinian city in the West Bank of approximately 57,000 residents. ...


A recent letter from Congressman Henry Hyde to President George W. Bush notes that "the Christian community is being crushed in the mill of the bitter Israeli-Palestinian conflict," and that expanding Jewish settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem are "irreversibly damaging the dwindling Christian community." [12] [13] The Arab Human Rights Association claims Israeli authorities have denied access to holy places, prevented repairs needed to preserve historic holy sites, and carried out physical attacks on religious leaders.[14] Henry John Hyde (born April 18, 1924), American politician, has been a philandering member of the United States House of Representatives since 1975, representing the 6th District of Illinois (map). ...


After Pope Benedict XVI's comments on Islam in September 2006, five churches, among them two Greek Orthodox churches - as such, not affiliated with either Catholicism or the Pope - were firebombed and shot at in the West Bank and Gaza. No one was hurt and no one claimed responsibility.[15] Palestinian Prime Minister Ismail Haniya condemned the attacks and police presence was elevated in Bethlehem, which has a sizable Christian community.[16] Pope Benedict XVI, January 2006 The Pope Benedict XVI Islam controversy arose from a lecture delivered on 12 September 2006 by Pope Benedict XVI at the University of Regensburg in Germany. ... Greek Orthodox Church can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches: the Orthodox Church of Constantinople, headed by the Patriarch of Constantinople, who is also the first among equals of the Eastern Orthodox Communion. ... Ismail Haniya (more frequently Haniyeh) (born 1963) (Arabic: إسماعيل هنية) is the Prime Minister of the Palestinian National Authority. ... Central Bethlehem Bethlehem (Arabic بيت لحم   house of meat; Standard Hebrew בית לחם house of bread, Bet léḥem / Bet láḥem; Tiberian Hebrew Bêṯ léḥem / Bêṯ lāḥem; Greek: Βηθλεέμ) is a city in the Bethlehem Governorate of the West Bank under Palestinian Authority considered a central hub of Palestinian cultural and tourism...


References

  1. ^ a b Charles M. Sennot (2007). The Body and the Blood: The Middle East's Vanishing Christians and the Possibility for Peace. Public Affairs. ISBN 1586481657. 
  2. ^ Guide: Christians in the Middle East. BBC (15 December 2005). Retrieved on 05.06.2007.
  3. ^ POPULATION, BY RELIGION AND POPULATION GROUP. Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics (2004). Retrieved on 05.07.2005.
  4. ^ Jonathan Cook (10 January 2007). Israel's Purging of Palestinian Christians. Antiwar.com. Retrieved on 05.07.2007.
  5. ^ Don Wagner (12 March 2002). Palestinian Christians: An Historic Community at Risk?. The Jerusalem Fund for Education and Community Development. Retrieved on 05.07.2007.
  6. ^ Chris Mitchell. Palestinian Christians Face Persecution. The Christian Broadcasting Network. Retrieved on 05.07.2007.
  7. ^ Harry de Quetteville (9 September 2005). 'Islamic mafia' accused of persecuting Holy Land Christians. The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved on 05.07.2007.
  8. ^ Americans not sure where Bethlehem is, survey shows. Ekklesia (20 December 2006). Retrieved on 05.07.2007.
  9. ^ Yossi Klein Halevi (30 March 1998). Palestinian Christians Win US Political Assylum. Israel Resource Review.
  10. ^ Heather Sharp (15 December 2005). Holy Land Christians' Decline. BBC. Retrieved on 05.07.2007.
  11. ^ Middle East Christians: Gaza pastor. BBC (21 December 2005). Retrieved on 05.07.2007.
  12. ^ Ofer Shelah (29 May 2006). Jesus and the Separation Fence. Retrieved on 05.07.2007.
  13. ^ Robert Novak (25 May 2006). [[Reprinted at Churches for Middle East http://www.cmep.org/Alerts/2006May25.htm Plea for Palestinian Christians]. The Washington Post. Retrieved on 05.07.2007.
  14. ^ [http://www.arabhra.org/publications/reports/PDF/sanctitydenied_english.pdf Sanctity Denied: The Destruction and Abuse of Muslim and Christian Holy Places in Israel]. Arab Human Rights Association (December 2004). Retrieved on 05.07.2007.
  15. ^ Five churches bombed and attacked AP via Yahoo! News 16 September 2006 (Link dead as of 15 January 2007)
  16. ^ "Pope Apologizes for Remarks About Islam", New York Times, 17 September 2006. 

The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion (US$7. ... The Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (הלשכה המרכזית לסטטיסטיקה), often abbreviated to CBS, is the Israeli government bureau commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Israel. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... The ecclesia or ekklesia was the principal assembly of the democracy of ancient Athens. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion (US$7. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion (US$7. ... Robert David Sanders Novak (born February 26, 1931) is a conservative American political commentator and political figure. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... // 1400 - Owain Glyndŵr declared Prince of Wales by his followers. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

External links

  • Beliefnet.com - What is it like to be a Palestinian Christian?
  • RELIGION IN THE NEWS - Israelis and Palestinians
  • Palestian Christians: A Historic Community at Risk?
  • Al-Bushra (an Arab-American Catholic perspective)
  • PALESTINIAN CHRISTIANS: CHALLENGES AND HOPES by Bernard Sabella
  • A Christian-Free Holy Land
  • Salt of the Earth: Palestinian Christians in the Northern West Bank, a documentary film series
  • HOLY LAND: CHRISTIANS IN PERIL, a documentary film by Pierre Rehov
    • Film trailer

 
 

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