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Libertarianism
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Schools of thought

Agorism
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Geolibertarianism
Green libertarianism
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Neolibertarianism
Paleolibertarianism
Agorism is a radical left-libertarian political philosophy popularized by Samuel Edward Konkin III, who defined an agorist as a conscious practitioner of counter-economics (peaceful black markets and grey markets). ... Anarcho-capitalism refers to an anti-statist philosophy that embraces capitalism as one of its foundational principles. ... Geolibertarianism (also geoanarchism) is a liberal political philosophy that holds along with other forms of libertarian individualism that each individual has an exclusive right to the fruits of his or her labor, as opposed to this product being owned collectively by society or the community. ... Green-Libertarian describes a political philosophy that was established in the United States. ... Libertarianism is a political philosophy that holds that individuals should be allowed complete freedom of action as long as they do not infringe on the freedom of others. ... Left-libertarianism is a term that has been adopted by several different movements and theorists. ... In civics, minarchism, sometimes called minimal statism or small government, is the view that the size, role and influence of government in a free society should be minimal — only large enough to protect the liberty and property of each individual. ... Neolibertarianism is a political philosophy combining elements of libertarian and conservative thought that embraces incrementalism and pragmatism domestically, and a generally interventionist foreign policy based on self-interest, national defense and the expansion of freedom. ...

Origins

Austrian School
Chicago School
Classical liberalism
Individualist anarchism
The Austrian School, also known as the Vienna School or the Psychological School, is a school of economic thought that advocates adherence to strict methodological individualism. ... The Chicago School of Economics is a school of thought in economics; it refers to the style of economics practiced at and disseminated from the University of Chicago after 1946. ... Classical liberalism (also known as traditional liberalism[1] and laissez-faire liberalism[2]) is a doctrine stressing the importance of human rationality, individual property rights, natural rights, the protection of civil liberties, constitutional limitations of government, free markets, and individual freedom from restraint as exemplified in the writings of Adam... Individualist Anarchism is an anarchist philosophical tradition that has a strong emphasis on sovereignty of the individual[1] and is generally opposed to collectivism[2]. The tradition appears most often in the United States, most notably in regard to its advocacy of private property. ...

Ideas

Civil liberties
Free markets
Free trade
Laissez-faire
Liberty
Individualism
Non-aggression
Private property
Self-ownership
Civil liberties is the name given to freedoms that protect the individual from government. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ... Liberty is generally considered a concept of political philosophy and identifies the condition in which an individual has immunity from the arbitrary exercise of authority. ... Methodological individualism is a philosophical orientation toward explaining broad society-wide developments as the accumulation of decisions by individuals. ... The non-aggression principle (also called the non-aggression axiom, anticoercion principle, or zero aggression principle) is a deontological ethical stance associated with the libertarian movement. ... This page deals with property as ownership rights. ... Self-ownership or sovereignty of the individual or individual sovereignty is the condition where an individual has the exclusive moral right to control his or her own body and life. ...

Topics

Economic views
Libertarian theorists
History
Movement
Parties
Theories of law
Views of rights
Criticism of libertarianism
Economic libertarianism is the doctrine that government should not engage in economic interventionism, but only prohibit force and fraud. ... This is a list of notable Libertarian theorists and authors. ... Modern libertarians see themselves as having revived the original doctrine of liberalism, and often call themselves libertarians and classical liberals interchangeably. ... The libertarian movement consists of the various individuals and institutions who have historically advanced the ideas and causes of libertarianism. ... Many countries and subnational political entities have libertarian political parties. ... Libertarian theories of law build on libertarianism or classical liberalism. ... Libertarians and Objectivists limit what they define as rights to variations on the right to be left alone, and argue that other rights such as the right to a good education or the right to have free access to water are not legitimate rights and do not deserve the same... Libertarianism is a political philosophy that supports largely unrestricted property rights and opposes most government interventions (such as taxation, prosecution of victimless crimes and regulations on businesses beyond the minimum required to prevent fraud or property damage) as coercive, even if a democratic majority supports it. ...

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Paleolibertarianism is a school of thought within American libertarianism founded by Lew Rockwell and Murray Rothbard, and closely associated with the Ludwig von Mises Institute. It is based on a combination of radical libertarianism in politics and cultural conservatism in social thought. Austrian economics, anti-federalism[1], and anarcho-capitalism heavily influenced the movement's attitudes toward ideas on trade, commerce and statecraft. Image File history File links Portal. ... This article does not adequately cite its references. ... Lew Rockwell Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr. ... Murray Newton Rothbard (March 2, 1926 – January 7, 1995) was an influential American economist, historian and natural law theorist belonging to the Austrian School of Economics who helped define modern libertarianism. ... Ludwig von Mises Institute for Austrian Economics, Auburn, Alabama The Ludwig von Mises Institute (LvMI), based in Auburn, Alabama, is a libertarian academic organisation engaged in research and scholarship in the fields of economics, philosophy and political economy. ... Cultural conservatism is conservatism with respect to culture. ... The Austrian School is a school of economic thought which rejects opposing economists reliance on methods used in natural science for the study of human action, and instead bases its formalism of economics on relationships through logic or introspection called praxeology. ... Anti-Federalism was the name given to two distinct counter-movements in the late 18th Century American politics: The first Anti-Federalist movement formed in reaction to the Federalist movement of the 1780s. ... Anarcho-capitalism refers to an anti-statist philosophy that embraces capitalism as one of its foundational principles. ...

Contents

Principles

The description as paleolibertarianism emphasized their differences with what they call neolibertarians, who, in their view, sacrifice libertarian ideas for political expediency. "Neolibertarianism" is characterized by these groups as a corruption of libertarian thought by policy think tanks and political parties which failed to offer principled opposition to the consolidation of federal power and interventionism in foreign policy (however, see the article on neolibertarianism for an important note about the shifting nature of the term). They make a similar critique of mainstream conservatives, the Republican Party, Religious Right and Mainline Christians. Neolibertarianism is a political philosophy combining elements of libertarian and conservative thought that embraces incrementalism and pragmatism domestically, and a generally interventionist foreign policy based on self-interest, national defense and the expansion of freedom. ... This article is about the institution. ... A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues. ... In politics, interventionism is a term for significant activity undertaken by a state to influence something not directly under its control. ... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ... Neolibertarianism is a political philosophy combining elements of libertarian and conservative thought that embraces incrementalism and pragmatism domestically, and a generally interventionist foreign policy based on self-interest, national defense and the expansion of freedom. ... American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      In the United States...


Lew Rockwell characterized paleolibertarian thought by saying:

Paleolibertarianism holds with Lord Acton that liberty is the highest political end of man, and that all forms of government intervention — economic, cultural, social, international — amount to an attack on prosperity, morals, and bourgeois civilization itself, and thus must be opposed at all levels and without compromise. It is 'paleo' because of its genesis in the work of Murray N. Rothbard and his predecessors, including Ludwig von Mises, Albert Jay Nock, Garet Garrett, and the entire interwar Old Right that opposed the New Deal and favored the Old Republic of property rights, freedom of association, and radical political decentralization. Just as important, paleolibertarianism predates the politicization of libertarianism that began in the 1980s, when large institutions moved to Washington and began to use the language of liberty as part of a grab bag of 'policy options.' Instead of principle, the neo-libertarians give us political alliances; instead of intellectually robust ideas, they give us marketable platitudes. What's more, paleolibertarianism distinguishes itself from left-libertarianism because it has made its peace with religion as the bedrock of liberty, property, and the natural order.[2] John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton (January 10, 1834 - June 19, 1902), English historian, only son of Sir Richard Dalberg-Acton, 7th Baronet, and grandson of the Neapolitan admiral, Sir John Acton, 6th Baronet, was born at Naples. ... Murray Newton Rothbard Murray Newton Rothbard (March 2, 1926 - January 7, 1995) was an American economist and political theorist belonging to the Austrian School of Economics who helped define modern libertarianism and anarcho-capitalism. ... Ludwig Heinrich Edler von Mises (September 29, 1881 – October 10, 1973) was a notable economist and a major influence on the modern libertarian movement. ... Albert Jay Nock (October 13, 1870 or 1872 - August 19, 1945) was an influential American libertarian author, educational theorist, and social critic of the early and middle 20th century. ... Garet Garrett (1878-1954) was an American journalist and author who was noted for his critiques of the New Deal and U.S. involvement in the Second World War. ... In the United States, the Old Right, also called the Paleoconservatives are a faction of American conservatives who both opposed New Deal domestic programs and were also isolationists opposing entry into World War II. Many were associated with the Republicans of the interwar years led by Robert Taft, but some... The New Deal was the title President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs he initiated between 1933 and 1938 with the goal of providing relief, recovery, and reform (3 Rs) to the people and economy of the United States during the Great Depression. ... The Constitution in Exile is a controversial term that refers to provisions of the United States Constitution whose interpretation by the Supreme Court have changed since roughly the 1930s, and which have not been strictly enforced, such as the interstate commerce clause. ... This page deals with property as ownership rights. ... Freedom of association is a Constitutional (legal) concept based on the premise that it is the right of free adults to mutually choose their associates for whatever purpose they see fit. ... // Le de décentralisation de de est le processus de la dispersion prise de décision plus près du point de service ou action. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2... Neolibertarianism is a subset of libertarianism that holds that land is just a form of capital, and that therefore concentrated ownership of land does not conflict with free market principles, so long as it is not established by force. ... Left-libertarianism is a term that has been adopted by several different movements and theorists. ... Liberty is generally considered a concept of political philosophy and identifies the condition in which an individual has immunity from the arbitrary exercise of authority. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The natural order is the moral source from which natural law seeks to derive its authority. ...

(It may be worth noting that Rockwell has since abandoned the term paleolibertarian and henceforth began refering to himself simply as a libertarian.)


Paleolibertarianism is commonly distinguished by:

  • Political alliances with paleoconservatism. The two groups are closely related, although they sometimes quarrel over the virtues of free trade, Wal-Mart and other issues. For example, paleolibertarians tend to praise Patrick Buchanan for his stances on foreign policy, yet accuse him of protectionism. Conversely, paleoconservative Sam Francis argued that big business should serve the interest of middle America [1]. Both sides prefer to attack their mutual opponents than each other, however.
  • Disaffiliation from the post-Cold War-era alliance between libertarians and the New Left. This trend has been checked by the influence of Murray Rothbard. Also, in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks and the War on Terror, the paleolibertarians' antipathy with the conservative movement, other than distinctly paleoconservative types, rose tremendously.
  • Sharp opposition to neoconservatism and interventionist foreign policy.
  • Radical decentralization in politics; most paleolibertarians subscribe to some form of anarcho-capitalism and do not associate with any political party.
  • No universal consensus exists with paleolibertarians on the debate of what, if any, role the government should play on the issue of regulating immigration and the borders. While practically all paleolibertarians subscribe to a philosophy of anarcho-capitalism, they differ with what a society with a state (i.e., a state that controls and "owns" property and has a welfare system) should do. However, paleolibertarians are slightly more inclined than not to support some kind of border enforcement and immigration regulation. (See notes for further elaboration.[3]) This is in contrast to the generally held view by libertarians who subscribe to open borders and unregulated immigration.
  • Commitment to a natural law approach to libertarian theory, and intense opposition towards utilitarian approaches.
  • Appreciation for classical American anti-federalism, sometimes criticizing Abraham Lincoln[4] for leading America toward a centralized, managerial state.
  • Appreciation for traditional values and customs, along with churches and voluntary associations, as an alternative to state-backed social engineering and managerial public policy. The paleos express frustration over other libertarians who stress what they see as positive rights (such as gay rights, abortion rights and sexual freedom) rather than fight state coercion on life, liberty and property.

Justin Raimondo's 1993 book Reclaiming the American Right[5] links paleolibertarianism with the anti-interventionist American old right. In Democracy: The God That Failed[6] by Hans-Hermann Hoppe, Hoppe argues that "conservatives today must be antistatist libertarians and, equally important, [that] libertarians must be conservatives". (Page 189.) He argues that to obtain social conservatism one must embrace radical paleolibertarianism. (See selected article "The Intellectual Incoherence of Conservatism" by Hans-Hermann Hoppe.) Paleoconservatism (sometimes shortened to paleo or paleocon when the context is clear) is an anti-communist and anti-authoritarian[1] right wing movement based primarily in the United States that stresses tradition, civil society and classical federalism, along with familial, religious, regional, national and Western identity. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Several groups have criticized Wal-Marts policies and/or business practices, including community groups, grassroots organizations, labor unions,[1] religious organizations,[2][3] and environmental groups. ... Patrick Buchanan Patrick Joseph Buchanan (born November 2, 1938), usually known as Pat Buchanan, is an American conservative journalist and a well known television political commentator. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of restraining trade between nations, through methods such as high tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, a variety of restrictive government regulations designed to discourage imports, and anti-dumping laws in an attempt to protect domestic industries in a particular nation from foreign take-over... See also: other Sam Francises Samuel Lewis Francis (1923 - November 4, 1994) was an American painter and printmaker. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... This article does not adequately cite its references. ... The New Left is a term used in different countries to describe left-wing movements that occurred in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Murray Newton Rothbard (March 2, 1926 – January 7, 1995) was an influential American economist, historian and natural law theorist belonging to the Austrian School of Economics who helped define modern libertarianism. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terror) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies to destroy groups deemed to be terrorist (primarily radical Islamist organizations such as al-Qaeda... American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... Paleoconservatism (sometimes shortened to paleo or paleocon when the context is clear) is an anti-communist and anti-authoritarian[1] right wing movement based primarily in the United States that stresses tradition, civil society and classical federalism, along with familial, religious, regional, national and Western identity. ... Neoconservatism is a political movement that emerged as a rejection of liberalism and the New Left counter-culture of the 1960s. ... // Le de décentralisation de de est le processus de la dispersion prise de décision plus près du point de service ou action. ... Anarcho-capitalism refers to an anti-statist philosophy that embraces capitalism as one of its foundational principles. ... Anarcho-capitalism refers to an anti-statist philosophy that embraces capitalism as one of its foundational principles. ... For libertarians, immigration can be a controversial question. ... Natural law or the law of nature (Latin: lex naturalis) is an ethical theory that posits the existence of a law whose content is set by nature and that therefore has validity everywhere. ... Utilitarianism (1861), see Utilitarianism (book). ... Anti-Federalism was the name given to two distinct counter-movements in the late 18th Century American politics: The first Anti-Federalist movement formed in reaction to the Federalist movement of the 1780s. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Managerial State is a paleoconservative concept used in critiquing modern social democracy in Western countries. ... A Positive right is a right, either moral or decreed by law, to be provided with something so that it is incumbent upon another to act, as opposed to a negative right which is a right to not be subject to the action of another. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... The morality and legality of abortion are controversial topics. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Coercion is the practice of compelling a person to involuntarily behave in a certain way (whether through action or inaction) by use of threats, intimidation or some other form of pressure or force. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Old Right refers to separate political groups in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... Democracy: The God That Failed is a book by Hans-Hermann Hoppe, containing a series of thirteen essays on the subject of democracy, and concluding with the belief that democracy is a sign of decivilization sweeping the world since World War I and that it must be delegitimized. ... Hans-Hermann Hoppe (born September 2, 1949) is an Austrian school economist, an anarcho-capitalist (libertarian) philosopher, and a professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Prominent paleolibertarians include Lew Rockwell, Hans-Hermann Hoppe, Thomas DiLorenzo, Joseph Sobran and Thomas Woods. Closely affiliated institutions include the Ludwig von Mises Institute, the Center for Libertarian Studies, and the Property and Freedom Society. Lew Rockwell Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr. ... Hans-Hermann Hoppe (born September 2, 1949) is an Austrian school economist, an anarcho-capitalist (libertarian) philosopher, and a professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. ... Thomas DiLorenzo Thomas J. DiLorenzo (born 1954) is an American economics professor at Loyola College in Maryland. ... Joseph Sobran Joseph Sobran (born February 23, 1946, Michigan) is an American journalist and writer, formerly with National Review and currently a syndicated columnist. ... Thomas Woods Thomas E. Woods, Jr. ... Ludwig von Mises Institute for Austrian Economics, Auburn, Alabama The Ludwig von Mises Institute (LvMI), based in Auburn, Alabama, is a libertarian academic organisation engaged in research and scholarship in the fields of economics, philosophy and political economy. ... The Center for Libertarian Studies is a libertarian educational organization founded in 1976 by Murray Rothbard. ...


Divergence from paleoconservatism

Voluntary armies

Thomas Fleming claims Lew Rockwell became “dangerously muddled” after Murray Rothbard’s death. He says some paleolibertarians went off the deep end:

They hate not just war but the military itself. They reject not only imperialism but also patriotism; they are not merely opposed to nationalism but reject the concept of the nation.[2]

Fleming debated paleolibertarian Thomas Woods over whether laissez-faire meshed with Roman Catholic orthodoxy.[3] He claims the “last straw” was a 2003 article by Jeffrey Tucker of the Mises Institute, whom he said defends “desertion as a legitimate career move for a disgruntled soldier.” Tucker had argued that the concept of a “voluntary military” was a myth because the penalty for desertion is death. He said that soldiers “die for exercising their God-given right to walk away.”[4] In the article, Tucker also wrote: Thomas Woods Thomas E. Woods, Jr. ...

[One] wonders how much the ranks of the militarily employed would shrink in absence of anti-desertion enforcement. If modern presidents had to recruit the way barons and lords recruited, and if they constantly faced the prospect of mass desertions, they might be more careful about getting involved in unnecessary, unjust, unwinnable wars, or going to war at all. Peace would take on new value out of necessity. When going to war, they might be more careful to curb their war aims, and match war strategies with those more limited aims.[5]

Buchanan and markets

Murray Rothbard declared in 1992 that “with Pat Buchanan as our leader, we shall break the clock of social democracy.”[7] Three years later, he said Buchanan developed too much faith in economic planning and centralized state power.[6] Rothbard’s paleolibertarian heirs frequently say the commentator promotes mercantilist economic views, even as they praise his anti-interventionism.


For example, Buchanan said in 1998:

As you may have heard in my last campaign, I am called by many names. 'Protectionist' is one of the nicer ones; but it is inexact. I am an economic nationalist. To me, the country comes before the economy; and the economy exists for the people. I believe in free markets, but I do not worship them. In the proper hierarchy of things, it is the market that must be harnessed to work for man - and not the other way around.[7]

Rockwell says that “paleoism” is not dead, but that Buchanan is not the right person to lead a middle class revolt. He wrote:

The libertarian faction of the [paleo] movement saw that far too many compromises were being made to accommodate Buchanan's increasingly idiosyncratic and statist political views. His anti-free market, pro-trade union bias was now out of the bag; indeed, it became a central theme of his campaign. The idea behind the paleo turn was to decry ideological sellout, not follow some ambitious politician down the same road![8]

Selected articles

Header image from LewRockwell. ... WorldNetDaily, also known as WND, is an American conservative online news site, founded in 1997. ... The American Conservative magazine. ...

Critical views

Patrick Joseph Buchanan (born November 2, 1938) is an American politician, author, syndicated columnist, and broadcaster. ... Samuel Todd Francis (April 29, 1947 – February 15, 2005) was a nationally syndicated paleoconservative columnist known for his opposition to immigration, multiculturalism, and his involvement in debates concerning other controversial issues of the day. ... Paul Craig Roberts Paul Craig Roberts is an economist and a nationally syndicated columnist for Creators Syndicate. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Though they refer to the principle as federalism, believing the historical Federalist Party to be misnamed, thinking of them as "Nationalists" or "Centralizers" and the historical Anti-Federalists as being the actual federalists.
  2. ^ Lew Rockwell as quoted by Karen De Coster. Also see Blog entry
  3. ^ The Journal of Libertarian Studies, Vol. 13 Num. 2, examines the case of restricted and unrestricted immigration. Also see "On Free Immigration and Forced Integration" by Hans-Hermann Hoppe, "A Simple Libertarian Argument Against Unrestricted Immigration and Open Borders" by N. Stephan Kinsella (follow-up), "More on the Libertarian Immigration Debate" by Brad Edmonds, "Wrong, Pat, wrong" by Karen De Coster, and "The Trouble With 'Cracking Down on Immigration'" by Anthony Gregory
  4. ^ See the "King Lincoln" Archives at LewRockwell.com
  5. ^ Raimondo, Justin (1993). Reclaiming the American Right. Center for Libertarian Studies. ISBN 1-8839-5900-4. OCLC 30055223. 
  6. ^ Hoppe, Hans-Hermann (2001). Democracy: The God That Failed. Transaction Publishers. ISBN 0-7658-0088-8. OCLC 46384089. 
  7. ^ Gottfried, Paul; Thomas Fleming (1988). The Conservative Movement. Twayne Publishers, pp. 161. ISBN 0-8057-9723-8. OCLC 16804886. 

The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political federalism is a political philosophy in which a group of members are bound together (Latin: foedus, covenant) with a governing representative head. ... The label Federalist refers to two major groups in the history of the United States of America: (1. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Center for Libertarian Studies is a libertarian educational organization founded in 1976 by Murray Rothbard. ... OCLC Online Computer Library Center was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC). ... Hans-Hermann Hoppe (born September 2, 1949) is an Austrian school economist, an anarcho-capitalist (libertarian) philosopher, and a professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. ... OCLC Online Computer Library Center was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC). ... Paul Gottfried Paul Edward Gottfried is Raffensperger Professor of Humanities at Elizabethtown College and a Guggenheim recipient. ... OCLC Online Computer Library Center was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Paleolibertarianism at AllExperts (441 words)
Paleolibertarianism is a school of thought within American libertarianism founded by Lew Rockwell.
Paleolibertarianism is based on a combination of radical libertarianism in politics and cultural conservatism in social thought.
"Paleolibertarianism holds with Lord Acton that liberty is the highest political end of man, and that all forms of government intervention —economic, cultural, social, international —amount to an attack on prosperity, morals, and bourgeois civilization itself, and thus must be opposed at all levels and without compromise.
Paleoconservatism - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (2561 words)
There are many followers of the late Murray Rothbard and Lew Rockwell who embrace paleolibertarianism, and being culturally conservative, espouse many of the same themes of paleoconservatives, but they are wholly committed to economic laissez-faire.
However, the southern conservatives and paleolibertarians are generally in favor of economic laissez-faire and free trade.
Still, some paleolibertarians take an ambivalent view on the subject in keeping with their other economic differences with the rest of the paleocons.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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