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Encyclopedia > Paleoconservative
Conservatism [edit]

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Conservative parties
Neoconservatism
Paleoconservatism
Conservative Party, as a proper noun, can refer to: Canada Conservative Party of Canada (since 2003) Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-2003) Conservative Party of Canada (historical) (until 1942) Their respective affiliated provincial parties Chile - Conservative Party Colombia - Colombian Conservative Party Denmark - Conservative Peoples Party New Zealand - Conservative... Neoconservatism describes several distinct political ideologies which are considered new forms of conservatism. ...

The term paleoconservative (sometimes shortened to paleo or paleocon when the context is clear) refers to an American branch of conservative Old Right thought that is frequently at odds with the current of conservative thought as espoused by the Republican Party elite. Paleoconservatives particularly target those whose beliefs they classify as neoconservative. Thus, paleoconservatives are frequently averse to the sentiments expressed by the National Review and the Weekly Standard magazines. The term derives from the Greek root palaeo- meaning "ancient" or "old". Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ... The Old Right refers to separate political groups in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... Neoconservatism is a somewhat controversial term referring to the political goals and ideology of the new conservatives (ultraconservative) in the United States. ... National Review (NR) is a conservative political magazine founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ... The Weekly Standard is an American Conservative political magazine published 48 times per year. ... For the span of recorded history starting roughly 5,000-5,500 years ago, see Ancient history. ... Old age consists of ages nearing the average lifespan of human beings, and thus the end of the human life cycle. ...

Contents


Beliefs

Many paleoconservatives identify themselves as "classical conservatives," and trace their philosophy to the Old Right Republicans of the interwar period who successfully kept America out of the League of Nations, cut down non-European immigration in 1924, and stood opposed to Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal proposals. The Old Right refers to separate political groups in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... The League of Nations was an international organization founded after the First World War at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... The New Deal was President Franklin D. Roosevelts legislative agenda for rescuing the United States from the Great Depression. ...


Some historians, such as Paul V. Murphy and Isaiah Berlin, see the paleoconservatives' intellectual ancestors as those anti-modern writers who defended hierarchy, localism, ultramontanism, monarchy, and aristocracy. European precursors to paleoconservatives include Joseph de Maistre and Pope Pius X. Likewise, the continental conservative Jacques Barzun has a mode of thought and criticism esteemed by many paleoconservatives. In America, the Southern Agrarians, Charles Lindbergh, Albert Jay Nock, and Russell Kirk, among others, articulated positions that proved influential among paleoconservatives in our time. The southern conservative thread of paleoconservatism embodying the statesmanship of nineteenth-century figures such as John Randolph of Roanoke, John Taylor of Caroline and John C. Calhoun has influenced many modern paleoconservatives, and found a modern expositor in Mel Bradford. Sir Isaiah Berlin Sir Isaiah Berlin (June 6, 1909 – November 5, 1997) was a political philosopher and historian of ideas, regarded as one of the leading liberal thinkers of the 20th century. ... Since the beginnings of mechanization and even industrialization, there has been a strand of opinion which rejects, objects to, or has been highly critical of the costs of the changes that these trends brought about. ... A hierarchy (in Greek hieros, sacred, and arkho, rule) is a system of ranking and organizing things. ... Localism usually describes social measures or trends which emphasise or value local and small-scale phenomena. ... Ultramontanism literally alludes to a policy supporting those dwelling beyond the mountains (ultra montes), that is beyond the Alps - generally referring to the Pope in Rome. ... A monarchy, (from the Greek monos, one, and archein, to rule) is a form of government that has a monarch as Head of State. ... The Ancient Greek term aristocracy meant a system of government with rule by the best. This is the first definition given in most dictionaries. ... Joseph de Maistre (1753- February 26, 1821) was a French writer, who was one of the most influential spokesmen for a counter-revolutionary and authoritarian conservatism, in the period following the French Revolution. ... His Holiness Pope Saint Pius X, born Giuseppe Melchiorre Sarto (June 2, 1835 – August 20, 1914), was Pope from 1903 to 1914, succeeding Pope Leo XIII. He was the first pope since the Counter-Reformation Pope St. ... Jacques Barzun Jacques Martin Barzun (1907-) continues to be a leading voice in the fields of literature, education, and cultural history. ... The Southern Agrarians or Vanderbilt Agrarians were a group of 12 American Traditionalist writers and poets from the Southern United States who joined together to publish the Agrarian manifesto, a collection of essays entitled Ill Take My Stand in 1930. ... Charles Lindbergh with the Spirit of St. ... Albert Jay Nock (October 13, 1870 or 1872 - August 19, 1945) was an influential American libertarian author, educational theorist, and social critic of the early and middle 20th century. ... Russell Kirk (1918-1994), was an American historian, moralist, social critic, and man of letters, best known as the father of modern conservatism. ... John Randolph (June 2, 1773 - May 24, 1833) was a Representative and a Senator from Virginia, USA. He was born in Cawsons, Virginia, known as John Randolph of Roanoke to distinguish him from relatives. ... John Taylor (December 19, 1753-August 21, 1824) of Caroline County, Virginia was a politician and writer. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850), was a prominent United States politician in the first half of the 19th century. ... Melvin E. Mel Bradford was a conservative political commentator and professor of literature at the University of Dallas. ...


Paleoconservatives esteem the principles of subsidiarity and localism in recognizing that one must surely be an Ohioan, Texan or Virginian as they are an American. They embrace federalism within a framework of nationalism and are typically staunch supporters of states' rights. They are also more critical of the welfare state than the neoconservatives tend to be. They tend to be critical of overreaching federal power usurping state and local authority. Compared to neoconservatives they are more willing to question free trade, more critical of further immigration and tend to embrace a moreisolationist foreign policy. During the Cold War many supported overseas committments as necessary to the defense of the United States. Many paleoconservatives supported NATO when it was a defensive organization despite its being an "entangling alliance" but dropped their support when NATO was used as a mechanism for intervention in Yugoslavia where they believed US interests were either marginal or non-existent. Paleoconservatives often esteem their America First principles as being commensurate with those of the Founding Fathers as embodied in the Neutrality Act. Perhaps a more appropriate organization of the between-wars era was For America. It should be noted that Taft and the isolationists upheld the principle that politics stops at the water's edge and supported World War II once the US was involved. John Quincy Adams avowed, "America does not go abroad, in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own." Subsidiarity is the idea that matters should be handled by the lowest competent authority. ... Localism usually describes social measures or trends which emphasise or value local and small-scale phenomena. ... Federalism is a system of government in which power is constitutionally divided between a central authority and constituent political units (like states or provinces). ... // Nationalism is an ideology which holds that the nation, ethnicity or national identity is a fundamental unit of human social life, and makes certain political claims based on that belief, above all the claim that the nation is the only legitimate basis for the state, and that each nation is... In American politics and constitutional law, states rights are guaranteed by the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, (i. ... There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Isolationism is a diplomatic policy whereby a nation seeks to avoid alliances with other nations. ... The America First movement was an isolationalist group that opposed United States involvement in World War II. Many prominent Americans were members, including aviator Charles Lindbergh. ... Several United States laws have been called Neutrality Acts: The Neutrality Act of 1935 prohibited American citizens from selling arms to belligerents in international war. ... Order: 6th President Vice President: John Caldwell Calhoun Term of office: March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829 Preceded by: James Monroe Succeeded by: Andrew Jackson Date of birth: July 11, 1767 Place of birth: Braintree, Massachusetts Date of death: February 23, 1848 Place of death: Washington, D.C. First Lady...


Paleoconservatives in modern America

The phraseology "paleoconservative" ("old conservatism") was a rejoinder issued in the 1980s to differentiate itself from "neoconservatism". The rift is often traced back to a dispute over the director of the National Endowment for the Humanities by the incoming Reagan Administration. The preferred candidate was professor Mel Bradford and he was replaced after an effective media and lobbying effort (focusing on his dislike of Abraham Lincoln) by William Bennett. The trends preceding that pronounced schism go back as far as the 1950s. The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is an independent federal agency created in 1965. ... Melvin E. Mel Bradford was a conservative political commentator and professor of literature at the University of Dallas. ... William John Bennett (born July 3, 1943) served as United States Secretary of Education from 1985 to 1988. ...


The paleoconservatives view neoconservatives — or those whom they identify as such — as interlopers. This tends to be a one direction political fight as most neoconservatives do not identify themselves as such and focus their energy on opposing the liberal left, not the extreme right. The paleoconservatives' view of the mainstream conservative movement is that of a self interested movement lacking the self confidence to defend its old ideas.


The best known contemporary paleoconservative is probably the commentator Patrick Buchanan, whose culture war speech is probably the most widely known paleoconservative critique. The main paleoconservative magazine is Chronicles Magazine. There are many followers of the late Murray Rothbard and Lew Rockwell who embrace paleolibertarianism, and being culturally conservative, they espouse many of the same themes of paleoconservatives, but are wholly committed to economic laissez-faire. Rep. Ron Paul and other members of the Liberty Committee frequently espouse a principled brand of classical republican statesmanship that reverberates with many paleocons. In many ways paleoconservatives consist of a disparate pool from all walks of life, including the blue-collar middle class to more affluent professionals, evangelical Christians and Roman Catholic traditionalists, libertarian individualists, Midwestern agrarians, Reagan Democrats, and southern conservatives. Patrick Buchanan Patrick Joseph Buchanan (born November 2, 1938), usually known as Pat Buchanan, is an American conservative journalist and a well known television political commentator. ... A culture war speech is typically given by conservatives who oppose abortion, gun control, separation of church and state, perceived lack of public morality, privacy, progressivism, and homosexuality (among other things). ... Chronicles is a US monthly magazine published by the paleoconservative Rockford Institute. ... Murray Newton Rothbard Murray Newton Rothbard (March 2, 1926 - January 7, 1995) was an American economist and political theorist belonging to the Austrian School of Economics who helped define modern libertarianism and anarcho-capitalism. ... Lew Rockwell Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr. ... Paleolibertarianism is a school of thought within American libertarianism founded by Murray Rothbard and Lew Rockwell, and closely associated with the Ludwig von Mises Institute. ... Representative Ron Paul Ronald Ernest Paul, MD (born August 20, 1935) is a member of the United States House of Representatives from Texass 14th congressional district (map). ...


Paleoconservatism has recently become the principal operating philosophy of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute (ISI). In its publications and conferences it often champions pre-WWII Old Right ideas, such as isolationism, limited government and cultural homogeneity. They do not engage in the market idolatry that characterizes so many libertarians and neoconservatism, and promote various agrarian and distributist works. The Intercollegiate Studies Institute (ISI) is an educational organization that was founded in 1953. ... Isolationism is a diplomatic policy whereby a nation seeks to avoid alliances with other nations. ... Agrarian has two meanings: It can mean pertaining to Agriculture It can also refer to the ideology of Agrarianism and Agrarian parties. ... Distributism, also known as distributionism and distributivism, is an economic philosophy held by such Catholic thinkers as G. K. Chesterton and Hilaire Belloc. ...


Many American paleoconservatives see themselves as iconoclasts, breaking what they regard as liberal taboos. Three particular targets of their ire are the widely popular figures of Martin Luther King, Franklin Roosevelt, Abraham Lincoln. Paleoconservatives attack the Frankfurt School as well. Some paleo-conservative figures, especially the late Samuel Francis, have had close ties to allegedly racist groups such as the Council of Conservative Citizens, American Renaissance and the journal The Occidental Quarterly. Martin Luther King Jr. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861–1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... The Frankfurt School is a school of neo-Marxist social theory, social research, and philosophy. ... ... Council of Conservative Citizens - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... American Renaissance (AR) is a monthly magazine published by the New Century Foundation, It describes itself as a literate, undeceived journal of race, immigration, and the decline of civility, but its detractors accuse it of being racist and white supremacist, although they usually concede that it is literate and intelligent. ... The Occidental Quarterly is a white nationalist journal that seeks to direct American conservatism in the direction of an Anglo-Saxon cultural and racialist ideology. ...


If principled paleoconservatives ever creep into a bit of pragmatic wishful thinking, it would only be a desire for gridlock over bipartisanship. Calvin Coolidge's adage that, "It is much more important to kill bad bills than to pass good ones," undoubtedly sits well with many paleoconservatives.


Since the end of the Cold War, paleoconservatives have attempted to enlarge a rift within the conservative movement with those they call neoconservatives. Although the demarcation line is often indistinct and shifting, harsh words have of late been exchanged between David Frum of National Review and Patrick Buchanan of The American Conservative. Frum charged that paleocons, in their sometimes harsh criticism of President George W. Bush and the war on terror, have become unpatriotic supporters of America's enemies and, at times, anti-Semitic. Buchanan and others have retorted that "neocons" run the U.S. government in pursuit of global empire and for the benefit of Israel and multi-national corporations with whom they have close ties; in doing so, paleoconservatives charged, they violate conservative principles of sovereignty while creating new enemies and fomenting Anti-Americanism abroad. For the generic term for a high-tension rivalry between countries, see cold war (war). ... David Frum (born 1960) is a former speechwriter for President George W. Bush, and the author of the first insider book about the Bush presidency. ... National Review (NR) is a conservative political magazine founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ... The American Conservative (TAC) is biweekly magazine published by Pat Buchanan, Scott McConnell, and Taki Theodoracopolous. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States. ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terror) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies to destroy groups deemed to be terrorist (primarily radical Islamist organizations such as al-Qaeda... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... An empire (also known technically, abstractly or disparagingly as an imperium, and with powers known among Romans as imperium) comprises a set of regions locally ruled by governors, viceroys or client kings in the name of an emperor. ... Sovereignty is the exclusive right to exercise supreme authority over a geographic region, group of people, or oneself. ... Anti-Americanism is a term referring to hostility towards or disapproval for the government, culture, history, and/or people of the United States of America. ...


Paleoconservatism outside of America

The term paleoconservative with a few exceptions continues to be uniquely an American term. However the political philosophies of paleoconservatives are not limited to the United States. Notable paleoconservatives such as Pat Buchanan and Sam Francis have often written high praise of European parties such as the Flemish Vlaams Belang or the French Front National. There parties in turn have had much praise for the paleoconservatives of America. While these parties and others like them share similar or sometimes near identical beliefs as American paleoconservatives they are more likely to be identified in their native countries as nationalist or National-Conservative. Patrick Buchanan Patrick Joseph Buchanan (born November 2, 1938), is an American author, syndicated columnist, and television commentator. ... See also: other Sam Francises Samuel Lewis Francis (1923 - November 4, 1994) was an American painter and printmaker. ... Flemish (in Dutch, Vlaams) can either refer to Anything belonging to Flanders (the Flemish nation) or to its inhabitants, the Flemings. ... Vlaams Belang (English: Flemish Interest) is a right-wing Belgian political party. ... Front National can mean: Front National, a right-wing French political party. ... Nationalism is an ideology that creates and sustains a nation as a concept of a common identity for groups of humans. ... National-Conservative is a political term used primarily in Europe to describe a type of right-wing political philosophy. ...


Further reading

  • Francis, Samuel Beautiful Losers: Essays on the Failure of American Conservatism, 1993. ISBN 0826209769.
  • Gottfried, Paul The Conservative Movement, 1993. ISBN 0805797491.
  • Raimondo, Justin Reclaiming the American Right: The Lost Legacy of the Conservative Movement, 1993. ISBN 1883959004.
  • Scotchie, Joseph The Paleoconservatives: New Voices of the Old Right, 1999. ISBN 1560004274.
  • Sunic, Tomislav Against Democracy and Equality: The European New Right, 1990. ISBN 0820412945.

Prominent paleoconservatives

Virginia Abernethy (born in 1934) is an American professor (emeritus) of psychiatry and anthropology at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. ... Melvin E. Mel Bradford was a conservative political commentator and professor of literature at the University of Dallas. ... Peter Brimelow Peter Brimelow is a British-American financial journalist. ... Lou Dobbs (born September 24, 1945) is a Harvard-educated economist, editorial columnist, anchor of CNNs nightly television series Lou Dobbs Tonight, and host of a syndicated radio show. ... Patrick Buchanan Patrick Joseph Buchanan (born November 2, 1938), is an American author, syndicated columnist, and television commentator. ... Thomas Fleming is an American writer, president of the Rockford Institute, and editor of Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture, a leading paleoconservative political commentary periodical. ... Ezola Broussard Foster (born August 9, 1938) was the Reform Party candidate for Vice President in the U.S. presidential election of 2000. ... ... Paul Gottfried is a professor of humanities at Elizabethtown College. ... President of the League of the South. ... Russell Kirk (1918-1994), was an American historian, moralist, social critic, and man of letters, best known as the father of modern conservatism. ... John Lukacs is a historian who has authored more than twenty books, including Five Days in London, May 1940 and The New Republic. ... Eric Margolis is a journalist born in New York City and holding degrees from Georgetown and New York Universities. ... Reworded from various sources. ... Robert David Novak (born February 26, 1931) is an American journalist and political figure. ... Joseph Pearce (born c. ... Michael Peroutka Michael Anthony Peroutka (born 1952) is a Maryland lawyer, the founder of the Institute On The Constitution and once held a position in the United States Department of Health and Human Services. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Paul Craig Roberts is a former Senior Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution, a former assistant secretary of the treasury in the Reagan Administration and a prolific and popular journalist. ... Joseph Sobran is an American Catholic writer and conservative anarchist who has written extensively on American politics and culture. ...

Paleoconservative organizations

The John Birch Society (JBS) is a right-wing conservative organization that was founded in 1958 to fight the perceived threat of Communism in the United States. ... The John Randoph Club (JRC) is a paleoconservative social and political organization founded in the 1980s and operated by the Rockford Institute with chapters throughout the United States. ... ... VDARE is an editorial collective website that advocates reduced immigration into the United States and other immigration reforms. ... The Constitution Party is a conservative third party in the United States, founded as the U.S. Taxpayers Party in 1992. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Paleoconservatism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1147 words)
Paleoconservatives esteem the principles of subsidiarity and localism in recognizing that one must surely be an Ohioan, Texan or Virginian as they are an American.
Paleoconservatives often esteem their America First principles as being commensurate with those of the Founding Fathers as embodied in the Neutrality Act.
The paleoconservatives' view of the mainstream conservative movement is that of a self interested movement tied to special interest groups, and lacking the self confidence to defend its old ideas.
Encyclopedia: Paleoconservative (3561 words)
The term paleoconservative (sometimes shortened to paleo or paleocon when the context is clear) refers to an American branch of conservative Old Right thought that is frequently at odds with the current of conservative thought as espoused by the Republican Party elite.
The paleoconservatives' view of the mainstream conservative movement is that of a self interested movement lacking the self confidence to defend its old ideas.
Notable paleoconservatives such as Pat Buchanan and Sam Francis have often written high praise of European parties such as the Flemish Vlaams Belang or the French Front National.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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