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Encyclopedia > Palace of Whitehall
The Palace of Whitehall by Hendrick Danckerts. The view is from the west. Despite appearances this painting shows a single palace complex. The Banqueting House is on the left.
The Palace of Whitehall by Hendrick Danckerts. The view is from the west. Despite appearances this painting shows a single palace complex. The Banqueting House is on the left.

The Palace of Whitehall was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698 when all except Inigo Jones' 1622 Banqueting House was destroyed by fire. Before the fire it had grown to be the largest palace in Europe, with over 1,500 rooms (and was at one time the largest building in the world). Image File history File links The_Old_Palace_of_Whitehall_by_Hendrik_Danckerts. ... Image File history File links The_Old_Palace_of_Whitehall_by_Hendrik_Danckerts. ... Hendrick Danckerts (c. ... Banqueting House, Whitehall, London The Banqueting House at Whitehall is a famous London building, formerly part of the Palace of Whitehall, designed by architect Inigo Jones in 1619, and completed in 1622, with assistance from John Webb. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Inigo Jones, by Sir Anthony van Dyck Inigo Jones (July 15, 1573–June 21, 1652) is regarded as the first significant English architect. ... Events January 1 - In the Gregorian calendar, January 1 is declared as the first day of the year, instead of March 25. ... Banqueting House, Whitehall, London The Banqueting House at Whitehall is a famous London building, formerly part of the Palace of Whitehall, designed by architect Inigo Jones in 1619, and completed in 1622, with assistance from John Webb. ... World map showing Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is one of the seven traditional continents of the Earth. ...


The palace gives its name — Whitehall — to the current administrative centre of the UK government. Whitehall, London, looking south towards the Houses of Parliament. ... Politics of the United Kingdom take place in the framework of a parliamentary, representative democratic monarchy, in which the Prime Minister is the head of government. ...

Contents

Location

At its most expansive, the palace extended over much of the area currently bordered by Northumberland Avenue in the north; to Downing Street and nearly to Derby Gate in the south; and from roughly the elevations of the current buildings facing Horse Guards Road in the west, to the then banks of the river Thames in the east (the construction of Victoria Embankment has since reclaimed more land from the Thames) - a total of about 23 acres (93,000 m²). Downing Street For a wider coverage of London, visit the London Portal. ... Horse Guards from St. ... Several places exist with the name Thames, and the word is also used as part of several brand and company names Most famous is the River Thames in England, on which the city of London stands Other Thames Rivers There is a Thames River in Canada There is a Thames... Victoria Embankment, London The Victoria Embankment, previously the Thames Embankment is a road and walkway along the north bank of the River Thames in London in the cities of Westminster and London. ... An acre is an English unit of area, which is also frequently used in the United States and some Commonwealth countries. ...


History

By the 13th century, the Palace of Westminster had become the centre of government in England, and had been the main London residence of the king since 1049. The surrounding area became a very popular — and expensive — location. Walter de Grey, the Archbishop of York bought a property in the area soon after 1240, calling it York Place. The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament or Westminster Palace, in London, England is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) meet to conduct their business. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Walter de Gray (died 1 May 1255), English prelate and statesman, was a nephew of John de Gray, bishop of Norwich, and was educated at Oxford. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ...


Edward I of England stayed at the property on several occasions while work was carried out at Westminster, and enlarged the building to accommodate his entourage. York Place was rebuilt during the 15th century and expanded so much by Cardinal Wolsey that it was rivalled by only Lambeth Palace as the greatest house in London, the King's London palaces included. Consequently when King Henry VIII removed the cardinal from power in 1530, he acquired York Place to replace Westminster as his main London residence. He inspected its treasures in the company of his young fiancée, Lady Anne Boleyn. Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1] and the Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and who kept Scotland under English domination during his lifetime. ... Thomas Wolsey, (circa March 1471-1475 – November 28 or November 29, 1530), born Thomas Wulcy in Ipswich, Suffolk, England, was a powerful English statesman and a cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Lambeth Palaces gatehouse. ... For the play, see Henry VIII (play). ... A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official in the Roman Catholic Church, a member of the College of Cardinals, ranking below the Pope and appointed by him during a consistory of the College. ... A portrait of Anne Boleyn painted some years after her death. ...

A plan of Whitehall Palace in 1680.
A plan of Whitehall Palace in 1680.
Part of a proposal for the replacement of the palace drawn by Christopher Wren in 1698. The palace was never rebuilt.
Part of a proposal for the replacement of the palace drawn by Christopher Wren in 1698. The palace was never rebuilt.

Henry VIII subsequently redesigned York Place, and further extended and rebuilt the palace during his lifetime. Inspired by Richmond Palace, he also included a recreation centre with a bowling green, tennis courts, a pit for cock fighting (now the site of 70 Whitehall) and a tiltyard for jousting. It is estimated that over £30,000 were spent during the 1540s, 50% more than the construction of the entire Bridewell Palace. Henry VIII married two of his wives at the palace - Anne Boleyn in 1533 and Jane Seymour in 1536. It was also at the palace that the King died in January 1547. Image File history File links Plan_of_Whitehall_Palace_1680. ... Image File history File links Plan_of_Whitehall_Palace_1680. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (734x877, 25 KB) Proposed addition to Whitehall Palace (portion of 1698 sketch by Christopher Wren) File links The following pages link to this file: Palace of Whitehall ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (734x877, 25 KB) Proposed addition to Whitehall Palace (portion of 1698 sketch by Christopher Wren) File links The following pages link to this file: Palace of Whitehall ... Sir Christopher Wren, (20 October 1632–25 February 1723) was a 17th century English designer, astronomer, geometrician, and the greatest English architect of his time. ... A royal residence 1327-1649, on The Green, Richmond-upon-Thames, Surrey. ... Bowling ball and two pins Ten-pin bowling lane This article is about the game. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... The Cock Fight by Jean-Léon Gérôme (1847) Training for a cockfight in Hell-Bourg on Réunion Island A cockfight is a blood sport between two specially trained roosters held in a ring called a cock ring. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... ISO 4217 Code GBP User(s) United Kingdom Inflation 2. ... The Pass Room at Bridewell from Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808–1811), drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin. ... For the play, see Henry VIII (play). ... A portrait of Anne Boleyn painted some years after her death. ... Jane Seymour was strict and formal compared to her flamboyant predecessor, Anne Boleyn. ...


James I made a few significant changes to the buildings, notably the construction in 1622 of a new Banqueting House built to a design by Inigo Jones to replace a series of previous banqueting houses dating from the time of Elizabeth I. Its decoration was finished in 1634 with the completion a ceiling by Sir Peter Paul Rubens, commissioned by Charles I (who was to be executed in front of the building in 1649). By 1650 the Palace was the largest complex of secular buildings in England, with over 1,500 rooms. The layout was extremely irregular and the constituent parts were of many different sizes and in several different architectural styles. The palace looked more like a small town than a single building. James VI and I (James Stuart) (June 19, 1566 – March 27, 1625) was King of Scots, King of England, and King of Ireland and was the first to style himself King of Great Britain. ... Banqueting House, Whitehall, London The Banqueting House at Whitehall is a famous London building, formerly part of the Palace of Whitehall, designed by architect Inigo Jones in 1619, and completed in 1622, with assistance from John Webb. ... Inigo Jones, by Sir Anthony van Dyck Inigo Jones (July 15, 1573–June 21, 1652) is regarded as the first significant English architect. ... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England, Queen of France (in name only), and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... Rubens and Isabella Brant in the Honeysuckle Bower Alte Pinakothek Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was the most popular and prolific Flemish and European painter of the 17th century. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ...


Charles II commissioned minor works. Like his father, he died at the Palace — though from a stroke, not execution. James II ordered various changes by Sir Christopher Wren, including a new chapel finished in 1687, rebuilding of the queen's apartments (1688?), and the queen's private lodgings (1689). Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... A stroke, also known as cerebrovascular accident (CVA),[1] is an acute neurological injury in which the blood supply to a part of the brain is interrupted. ... James II of England/VII of Scotland (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701) became King of Scots, King of England, and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685, and Duke of Normandy on 31 December 1660. ... Sir Christopher Wren, (20 October 1632–25 February 1723) was a 17th century English designer, astronomer, geometrician, and the greatest English architect of his time. ...


Demise

In 1691, when the palace was the largest palace complex in Europe — and a jumble of buildings — a fire destroyed much of the older palace structures. This actually gave a greater cohesiveness to the complex. However a further fire on January 4, 1698 destroyed most of the other residential and government buildings. Despite some rebuilding, financial constraints prevented large scale rebuilding. In the second half of the eighteenth century, much of the site was leased for the construction of town houses. January 4 is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ...


The palace today

Banqueting House is the only building now remaining, although it has been somewhat modified. However, various other features of the old palace still exist, including parts of the former covered tennis courts from the time of Henry VIII built into the Old Treasury and Cabinet Office at 70 Whitehall. The Cabinet Office is a department of the Government of the United Kingdom responsible for supporting the Prime Minister and Cabinet in progressing matters that require coordination across Government departments. ... Whitehall, London, looking south towards the Houses of Parliament. ...


Beginning in 1938, the east side of the site was redeveloped with the building now housing the Ministry of Defence. An undercroft from Wolsey's Great Chamber, now known as Henry VIII's Wine Cellar, a fine example of a Tudor brick-vaulted roof some 70 feet long and 30 feet wide, was found to interfere not just with the plan for the new building but also with the proposed route for Horse Guards Avenue. Following a request from Queen Mary in 1938 and a promise in Parliament, provision was made for the preservation of the cellar. Accordingly it was encased in steel and concrete and relocated nine feet to the west and nearly 19 feet deeper in 1949, when building was resumed at the site after World War II. This major operation was carried out without any significant damage to the structure and it now rests safe within the basement of the building. The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for implementation of government defence policy and the headquarters of the British Armed Forces. ... Thomas Wolsey, (circa March 1471-1475 – November 28 or November 29, 1530), born Thomas Wulcy in Ipswich, Suffolk, England, was a powerful English statesman and a cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom France Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Charles de Gaulle Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian...


A number of marble carvings from the former chapel at Whitehall (which was built for James II), can now be seen in the church at Burnham on Sea in Somerset, to where they were moved in 1820 after having originally been removed to Westminster Abbey in 1706. The shortest pier in Britain on the sea front at Burnham-on-Sea. ... Somerset is a county in the south-west of England. ... The Abbeys western façade The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west...


See also

The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament or Westminster Palace, in London, England is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) meet to conduct their business. ... St Jamess Palace and The Mall by Jan Kip, 1715. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Palace of Whitehall
  • Palace of Whitehall Timeline
  • Enlarged 1680 Plan of Whitehall, showing the location of the tennis courts, cockpit, tiltyard on the St James's Park side, and the configuration of buildings on the river side
  • View of Whitehall in 1669 showing the Banqueting House and Holbein Gateway


Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Banqueting House, Whitehall, London The Banqueting House at Whitehall is a famous London building, formerly part of the Palace of Whitehall, designed by architect Inigo Jones in 1619, and completed in 1622, with assistance from John Webb. ...

Royal Palaces and residencies in the United Kingdom
Occupied: Bagshot Park | Balmoral Castle | Buckingham Palace | Clarence House | Gatcombe Park | Highgrove | Hillsborough Castle | Holyrood Palace | St. James's Palace | Kensington Palace | Sandringham House | Thatched House Lodge | Windsor Castle
Historical: Palace of Beaulieu | Beaumont Palace | Bridewell Palace | Brantridge Park | Cadzow Castle | Cumberland Lodge | Dunfermline Palace | Eltham Palace | Falkland Palace | Fort Belvedere | Hampton Court Palace | Kew Palace | Linlithgow Palace | Marlborough House | Castle of Mey | Nonsuch Palace | Osborne House | Palace of Placentia | Queen's House | Richmond Palace | Royal Pavilion | Savoy Palace | Tower of London | Palace of Westminster | Palace of Whitehall | Woodstock Palace

  Results from FactBites:
 
Whitehall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (526 words)
Whitehall is a road in Westminster in London, the capital of the United Kingdom.
The name is taken from the vast Palace of Whitehall that used to occupy the surrounding area but was largely destroyed by fire in 1698.
Whitehall and the surrounding area is the administrative centre of the UK government; it is dominated by government buildings, to such an extent that the term is often used, by extension, to refer to the Civil service of the United Kingdom or the government itself.
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