FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Palace" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Palace
The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. Viewed from the back, across the Seine River, with the Sainte Chapelle on the right side. Painted in the 1410s. From the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry.
The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. Viewed from the back, across the Seine River, with the Sainte Chapelle on the right side. Painted in the 1410s. From the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry.
This article refers to royal residences. For more information on the graphical virtual reality application, see The Palace.

A palace is an important urban residence of a royal or noble family, with its origins as the executive power center of a kingdom or empire. Many extant palaces have been transformed for other uses, such as parliaments or museums. Download high resolution version (816x554, 178 KB)Detail from the month of June, haymaking, in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry by the Limbourg Brothers. ... Download high resolution version (816x554, 178 KB)Detail from the month of June, haymaking, in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry by the Limbourg Brothers. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... La Sainte-Chapelle (French for The Holy Chapel) is a Gothic chapel on the Ile de la Cité in the heart of Paris, France. ... An illuminated page from the Très Riches Heures showing the day for exchanging gifts from the month of January The Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry (or simply the Très Riches Heures) is probably the most important illuminated manuscript of the 15th century, le roi des... The Palace is a software program used to access two-dimensional virtual communities, also called palaces. ... In politics, a country (or in some cases, a group of countries) over which a king or queen reigns, is a kingdom, see: monarchy. ... An empire (also known technically, abstractly or disparagingly as an imperium, and with powers known among Romans as imperium) comprises a set of regions locally ruled by governors, viceroys or client kings in the name of an emperor. ... The debating chamber or hemicycle of the European Parliament in Brussels. ... A museum is typically a non-profit, permanent institution in the service of society and of its development, open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits, for purposes of study, education enjoyment, the tangible and intangible evidence of people and their environment. ...


The word "palace" to describe a royal residence comes from the name of one of the seven hills of Rome, the Palatine Hill. The original 'palaces' on the Palatine Hill were the seat of the imperial power, while the capitol on the Capitoline Hill was the seat of the senate and the religious nucleus of Rome. Long after the city grew to the seven hills the Palatine remained a desirable residential area. Augustus Caesar lived there in a purposefully modest house only set apart from his neighbors by the two laurel trees planted to flank the front door as a sign of triumph granted by the Senate. His descendants, especially Nero, with his "Golden House" enlarged the house and grounds over and over until it took up the hill top. The word Palatium came to mean the residence of the emperor rather than the neighborhood on top of the hill. The Seven Hills of Rome east of the Tiber form the heart of Rome. ... The Palatine Hill (Latin Palatium) is the centermost of the seven hills of Rome and is one of the most ancient parts of the city of Rome in Italy. ... The Palatine Hill (Latin Palatium) is the centermost of the seven hills of Rome and is one of the most ancient parts of the city of Rome in Italy. ... Piazza del Campidoglio, on the top of Capitoline Hill The Capitoline Hill (Capitolinus Mons), between the Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the famous and highest of the seven hills of Rome, the site of a temple for the Capitoline Triad: the gods Jupiter, his wife Juno and... Augustus (plural Augusti) is Latin for majestic or venerable. The greek equivalent is sebastos, or a mere grecization (by changing of the ending) augustos. ... The Domus Aurea (Latin for Golden House) was a large palace built by the Roman emperor Nero after the fire that devastated Rome in 64. ...


Historians apply the term "palace" anachronistically, to label the complex structures of Minoan Knossos, or the Mycenaean palace societies, or the 4th century incompletely-Hellenized palace system of Philip of Macedon's Vergina— or palaces outside the European world entirely. An anachronism (from Greek ana, back, and chronos, time) is something that is out of its natural time or appears to be. ... Knossos Knossos (35°18′ N 25°10′ E; alternative spellings Knossus, Cnossus, Gnossus, Greek Κνωσσός) is the largest Bronze Age archaeological site on Crete, probably the ceremonial and political center of the Minoan culture. ... Mycenaean can have the following meanings: coming from or belonging to the ancient town of Mycenae in Pelloponese in Greece; belonging to the culture of the Mycenaean period of the eastern Mediterranean in the late Bronze Age; the Mycenaean language, an ancient form of Greek, known from inscriptions in Linear... (3rd century - 4th century - 5th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... Philip II of Macedon (Macedonia) (382 BC - 336 BC), King of Macedon (ruled 359 BC - 336 BC), was the father of Alexander the Great (Alexander III of Macedon) and Philip III of Macedon. ... The entrance to the Great Tumulus Museum at Vergina Vergina (in Greek Βεργίνα) is a town in northern Greece, in the district of Imathia in the province of Central Macedonia. ...

The Palais des Papes was the seat of the Papal Curia. When the popes resided here at Avignon, it was an enclave within French territory.
The Palais des Papes was the seat of the Papal Curia. When the popes resided here at Avignon, it was an enclave within French territory.

Charlemagne consciously revived the Roman expression in his "palace" at Aachen, of which only his chapel remains. In the 9th century the "palace" indicated the whole government, and the constantly-travelling Charlemagne built fourteen. In the early Middle Ages, the Palas remained the seat of government in some German cities. In the Holy Roman Empire the powerful independent electors came to be housed in palaces (Paläste) In stronger monarchies even the greatest noble did not hold court in a palace; the German usage was a signal that the central power was not strong. Avignon, France, the Palais des Papes (Papal Palace). ... Avignon, France, the Palais des Papes (Papal Palace). ... The Champeux Gate of the Palais des Papes The Palais des Papes in Avignon, France is one of the largest and most important medieval Gothic buildings in Europe. ... C is As enclave and Bs exclave. ... Charlemagne is also the name of a column in The Economist on European affairs Charlemagne (c. ... Aachen Cathedral Dom 2004 The Aachen Cathedral, frequently referred to as the Imperial Cathedral (in German: Kaiserdom) of Aachen, is the oldest cathedral in northern Europe. ... This earthenware dish was made in 9th century Iraq. ... This page is about the Germanic empire. ... An elector can be: In the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation, the collegiate of seven Electors (eight since 1648) (Kurfürsten) consisted of those lay or clerical princes who had the right to vote in the election of the king or Holy Roman Emperor; see prince-elector. ...


In France there has been a clear distinction between a château and a palais. The palace has always been urban, like the Palais de la Cité in Paris (above), which was the royal palace of France and is now the supreme court of justice of France, or the palace of the Popes at Avignon (illustration, left). A château ( French for castle; plural châteaux) is a manor house or residence of the lord of the manor or a country house of gentry, usually French, with or without fortifications. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Catholic Church. ... Coat of arms of Avignon Avignon (pronounced in IPA, Provençal: Avignoun) is a commune in southern France with some 88,300 inhabitants in the city itself and 155,500 in the Greater Avignon area. ...


The château, by contrast, has always been in rural settings, supported by its demesne, even when it was no longer actually fortified. Speakers of English think of the "Palace of Versailles" because it was the residence of the king of France, and the king was the source of power, though the building has always remained the Château de Versailles for the French, and the seat of government under the ancien regime remained the Palais du Louvre. The Louvre had begun as a fortified Château du Louvre on the edge of Paris, but as the seat of government and shorn of its fortified architecture and then completely surrounded by the city, it developed into the Palais du Louvre. The feudal concept of demesne is a form of manorial land tenure as conceived in Western Europe, initially in France but exported to England, during the Middle Ages. ... Versailles: Louis Le Vau opened up the interior court to create the expansive entrance cour dhonneur, later copied all over Europe Versailles: Garden front The Château de Versailles — often called the Palace of Versailles, or simply Versailles — is a royal château, outside the gates of which the... Ancien R gime means Old Regime or Old Order in French; in English, the term refers primarily to the social and political system established in France under the Valois and Bourbon dynasties, and secondarily to any regime which shares the formers defining features: a feudal system under the control... I.M. Peis Louvre Pyramid: the entrance to the galleries lies below the glass pyramid The Louvre Museum (Musée du Louvre) in Paris, France, is one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ...

A palatial quinta: the Regaleira, Sintra, Portugal (Luigi Mannini, architect 1904–1910)
A palatial quinta: the Regaleira, Sintra, Portugal (Luigi Mannini, architect 1904–1910)

In Italy, where localized regimes lasted to the 19th century, many a small former capital displays its Palazzo Ducale, the seat of government. In Florence and other strong communal governments, the seat of government was the Palazzo della Signoria until in Florence the Medici were made Grand Dukes of Tuscany. Then, when the power center shifted to their residence in Palazzo Pitti, the old center of power began to be called the Palazzo Vecchio. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x960, 371 KB) Palacio da Regaleira, Sintra, Portugal. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x960, 371 KB) Palacio da Regaleira, Sintra, Portugal. ... Defensive towers at San Gimignano, Tuscany, bear witness to the factional strife within communes. ... Palazzo della Signoria Palazzo della Signoria was the original name of the Palazzo Vecchio, before the government of the Republic of Florence was moved to the Uffizi under Cosimo I de Medici. ... The Pitti Palace (Palazzo Pitti in Italian) in Florence was for several centuries the home of the ruling families of the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, from the time of the Medicis. ...


But indeed, in some Italian cities, it is not uncommon to find many "palaces," including some comparatively humble mansions, each built by one of the principal noble families. Each family's palazzo was a hive that contained all the family members, though it might not always show a grand architectural public front. In the 20th century palazzo in Italian came to apply to any large fine apartment building.

Blenheim Palace main entrance
Blenheim Palace main entrance

In England, by tacit agreement, there have been no "palaces" other than those used as official residences by royalty and certain bishops. Thus the Palace of Beaulieu gained its name precisely when Thomas Boleyn sold it to Henry VIII in 1517; previously it had been known as Walkfares. But like several other palaces, the name stuck even once the royal connection ended. Although the Palace of Blenheim (illustration, right) was never a royal residence, the name was part of the extraordinary honor when the house was given by a grateful nation to a great general. (Along with several royal and episcopal palaces in the countryside, Blenheim does demonstrate that "palace" has no specific urban connotations in English.) Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 904 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Palace John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough Blenheim Palace Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Counties/Oxfordshire Categories: GFDL images ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 904 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Palace John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough Blenheim Palace Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Counties/Oxfordshire Categories: GFDL images ... Blenheim Palace, The Great Court. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... The Palace of Beaulieu was located in Essex, UK, north of Chelmsford. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Blenheim Palace, The Great Court. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ...


As on the continent, these royal and episcopal palaces were not merely residences; the clerks who administered the realm or the diocese labored there as well. (To this day many bishops' palaces house both their family apartments and their official offices.) However, unlike the "Palais du Justice" which is often encountered in the French-speaking world, modern British public administration buildings are never called "palaces"; although the formal name for the "Houses of Parliament" is the Palace of Westminster, this reflects Westminster's former role as a royal residence and center of administration. The debating chamber or hemicycle of the European Parliament in Brussels. ... The Palace of Westminster lies on the bank of the River Thames in the heart of London. ...


In more recent years, the word has been used in a more informal sense for other large, impressive buildings, such as The Crystal Palace of 1851 (an immensely large, glazed hall erected for the Great Exhibition) and modern arenas-cum-convention centres like Alexandra Palace (which is no more a palace than Madison Square Garden is a garden). The facade of the original Crystal Palace side view of the Crystal Palace A huge iron and glass building, The Crystal Palace was one of the wonders of 19th Century Britain, if not the world. ... 1851 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Great Exhibition was an international exhibition held in Hyde Park London, from 1 May to 15 October 1851 and the first in a series of Worlds Fair exhibitions of culture and industry that were to be a popular 19th century feature. ... Alexandra Palace from the east Alexandra Palace was built on a hill in Muswell Hill in North London in 1873 as a public entertainment centre. ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. ...

For the household staff of palaces, see great house.

Contents

The household is the basic unit of analysis in many microeconomic and government models. ... A great house is a large and stately residence; the term encompasses different styles of dwelling in different countries. ...

List of Palaces by nation

Austria

Schönbrunn Palace, as seen from the gardens Fountains The Schönbrunn Palace near Vienna is one of the most important cultural monuments in Austria and since the 1860s has also been one of the major tourist attractions in Vienna. ... Hofburg Neue Burg section, seen from Heldenplatz. ...

Brunei

  • Istana Nurul Iman: official residence of the Sultan of Brunei and world's largest residential palace.

The Istana Nurul Iman palace is the official residence of the Sultan of Brunei located on the banks of the Brunei River. ...

China

The English word "palace" is used to translate the Chinese word 宮 (pronounced "gōng" in Mandarin). This character represents two rooms connected (呂), under a roof (宀). Originally the character applied to any residence or mansion, but starting with the Qin Dynasty (2nd century BC) it was used only for the residence of the emperor and members of the imperial family. Chinese palaces are different from post-Renaissance European palaces in the sense that they are not made up of one building only (however big and convoluted the building may be), but are in fact huge spaces surrounded by a wall and containing large separated halls (殿 diàn) for ceremonies and official business, as well as smaller buildings, galleries, courtyards, gardens, and outbuildings, more like the Roman or Carolingian palatium. Mandarin   listen?(Traditional: 北方話, Simplified: 北方话, Hanyu Pinyin: BÄ›ifānghuà, lit. ... The Qin Dynasty (秦朝 Pinyin Qín, Wade-Giles Chin; 221 BC - 207 BC) was preceded by the Zhou Dynasty and followed by the Han Dynasty in China. ...


List of imperial palaces, in chronological order:

  • Xianyang Palace (咸陽宮), in (Qin) Xianyang (咸陽), now 15 km/9 miles east of modern Xianyang, Shaanxi province: this was the royal palace of the state of Qin before the Chinese unification, and then the palace of the First Emperor when China was unified
  • Epang Palace (阿房宮 - probable meaning: "The Palace on the Hill"), 20 km/12 miles south of (Qin) Xianyang (咸陽), now 15 km/9 miles west of Xi'an (西安), Shaanxi province: the fabulous imperial palace built by the First Emperor in replacement of Xianyang Palace
  • Weiyang Palace (未央宮 - "The Endless Palace"), in (Han) Chang'an (長安), now 7km/4 miles northeast of downtown Xi'an (西安), Shaanxi province: imperial palace of the prestigious Western Han Dynasty for two centuries. This is the largest palace ever built on Earth, covering 4.8 km² (1,200 acres), which is 6.7 times the size of the current Forbidden City, or 11 times the size of the Vatican City.
  • Southern Palace (南宮) and Northern Palace (北宮), in Luoyang (洛陽), Henan province: imperial palaces of the Eastern Han Dynasty for two centuries, the Southern Palace being used for court hearings and audiences, the Northern Palace being the private residence of the emperor and his concubines
  • Taiji Palace (太極宮 - "The Palace of the Supreme Ultimate"), also known as the Western Apartments (西内), in (Tang) Chang'an (長安), now downtown Xi'an (西安), Shaanxi province: imperial palace during the Sui Dynasty (who called it Daxing Palace - 大興宮) and in the beginning of the Tang Dynasty (until A.D. 663). Area: 4.2 km² (1,040 acres), imperial section proper: 1.92 km² (474 acres).
  • Daming Palace (大明宮 - "The Palace of the Great Brightness"), also known as the Eastern Apartments (東内), in (Tang) Chang'an (長安), now downtown Xi'an (西安), Shaanxi province: imperial palace of the Tang Dynasty after A.D. 663 (it was briefly named Penglai Palace (蓬萊宮) between 663 and 705), but the prestigious Taiji Palace remained used for major state ceremonies such as coronations. Area: 3.11 km² (768 acres)
  • Kaifeng Imperial Palace (東京大内皇宮), in Dongjing (東京), now called Kaifeng (開封), Henan province: imperial palace of the Northern Song Dynasty
  • Hangzhou Imperial Palace (臨安大内禁宮), in Lin'an (臨安), now called Hangzhou (杭州), Zhejiang province: imperial palace of the Southern Song Dynasty
  • Ming Imperial Palace (明故宮), in Nanjing (南京), Jiangsu province: imperial palace of the Ming Dynasty until 1421
  • The Purple Forbidden City (紫禁城), now known in China as Beijing's Old Palace (北京故宫), in Jingshi (京師), now called Beijing (北京): imperial palace of the Ming Dynasty and Qing Dynasty from 1421 until 1924. Area: 720,000 m² (178 acres).

Apart from the main imperial palace, Chinese dynasties also had several other imperial palaces in the capital city where the empress, crown prince, or other members of the imperial family dwelled. There also existed palaces outside of the capital city called "away palaces" (離宮) where the emperors resided when traveling. The habit also developed of building garden estates in the countryside surrounding the capital city, where the emperors retired at times to get away from the rigid etiquette of the imperial palace, or simply to escape from the summer heat inside their capital. This practice reached a zenith with the Qing Dynasty, whose emperors built the fabulous Imperial Gardens (御園), now known in China as the Gardens of Perfect Brightness (圓明園), and better known in English as the Old Summer Palace. The emperors of the Qing Dynasty resided and worked in the Imperial Gardens, 8km/5 miles outside of the walls of Beijing, the Forbidden City inside Beijing being used only for formal ceremonies. Xianyang (Simplified Chinese: 咸阳; Traditional Chinese: 咸陽; pinyin: ) was the capital of the state of Qin during the Warring States Period in Chinese history, and remained to be capital during the short-lived Qin Dynasty. ... Shaanxi (Simplified Chinese: 陕西; Traditional Chinese: 陝西; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shensi, pronounced like Shahn-shee) is a northwestern province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling Mountains... State of Qin (small seal script, 220 BC) Qin or Chin (Wade-Giles) (秦) (778 BC-207 BC) was a state during the Spring and Autumn and Warring States Periods of China. ... Qin Shi Huang (秦始皇) (November or December 260 BC-September 10, 210 BC), personal name Zheng, was king of the Chinese State of Qin from 247 BC to 221 BC, and then the first emperor of a unified China from 221 BC to 210 BC, ruling under the name First Emperor. ... City nickname: Changan Location Image:Map of city xian. ... Shaanxi (Simplified Chinese: 陕西; Traditional Chinese: 陝西; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shensi, pronounced like Shahn-shee) is a northwestern province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling Mountains... Changan   listen? (Simplified Chinese: 长安; Traditional Chinese: 長安; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chang-an) is the ancient capital of more than 10 dynasties in China. ... City nickname: Changan Location Image:Map of city xian. ... Shaanxi (Simplified Chinese: 陕西; Traditional Chinese: 陝西; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shensi, pronounced like Shahn-shee) is a northwestern province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling Mountains... The Han Dynasty (Traditional Chinese characters: 漢朝, Simplified Chinese characters: 汉朝, pinyin Hàncháo 202 BC - AD 220) followed the Qin Dynasty and preceded the Three Kingdoms in China. ... Forbidden City Courtyard The Forbidden City or Forbidden Palace (Chinese: 紫禁城; Pinyin: ; literally Purple Forbidden City), located at the exact center of the ancient City of Beijing, was the imperial palace during the mid-Ming and the Qing dynasties. ... Luoyang(洛阳) (Simplified Chinese: 洛阳; Traditional Chinese: 洛陽; pinyin: ) is a city in Henan province, China. ... Henan (Chinese: 河南; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ho-nan), is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located in the central part of the country. ... The Han Dynasty (Traditional Chinese characters: 漢朝, Simplified Chinese characters: 汉朝, pinyin Hàncháo 202 BC - AD 220) followed the Qin Dynasty and preceded the Three Kingdoms in China. ... The Taiji diagram or Taijitu , 太極圖 of Zhou Dun-yi. ... Changan   listen? (Simplified Chinese: 长安; Traditional Chinese: 長安; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chang-an) is the ancient capital of more than 10 dynasties in China. ... City nickname: Changan Location Image:Map of city xian. ... Shaanxi (Simplified Chinese: 陕西; Traditional Chinese: 陝西; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shensi, pronounced like Shahn-shee) is a northwestern province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling Mountains... The Sui Dynasty (隋朝 Hanyu Pinyin: Suí, 581-618) followed the Southern and Northern Dynasties and preceded the Tang Dynasty in China. ... The Tang Dynasty (唐朝 pinyin: tángcháo) (June 18 Jarryd Gleesons Birth Date who is part of this dynasty, 618 – June 4, 907) followed the Sui Dynasty and preceded the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms Period in China. ... // Events Byzantine emperor Constans II invades south Italy (Part of) the city wall of Benevento is reconstructed The movement to restore Baekje is defeated by Silla and Tang Battle of Hakusukinoe An annonymous monk reaches the summit of mount Fuji Environmental change A brief outbreak of plague hits Britain Births... Changan   listen? (Simplified Chinese: 长安; Traditional Chinese: 長安; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chang-an) is the ancient capital of more than 10 dynasties in China. ... City nickname: Changan Location Image:Map of city xian. ... Shaanxi (Simplified Chinese: 陕西; Traditional Chinese: 陝西; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shensi, pronounced like Shahn-shee) is a northwestern province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling Mountains... The Tang Dynasty (唐朝 pinyin: tángcháo) (June 18 Jarryd Gleesons Birth Date who is part of this dynasty, 618 – June 4, 907) followed the Sui Dynasty and preceded the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms Period in China. ... // Events Byzantine emperor Constans II invades south Italy (Part of) the city wall of Benevento is reconstructed The movement to restore Baekje is defeated by Silla and Tang Battle of Hakusukinoe An annonymous monk reaches the summit of mount Fuji Environmental change A brief outbreak of plague hits Britain Births... // Events Byzantine emperor Constans II invades south Italy (Part of) the city wall of Benevento is reconstructed The movement to restore Baekje is defeated by Silla and Tang Battle of Hakusukinoe An annonymous monk reaches the summit of mount Fuji Environmental change A brief outbreak of plague hits Britain Births... Alternate meaning: Area code 705 Events End of the short-lived Zhou Dynasty in China Umayyad caliph Abd al-Malik succeeded by al-Walid I ibn Abd al-Malik. ... Kaifeng (Simplified Chinese: 开封; Traditional Chinese: 開封; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kai-feng), formerly Daliang (大梁), is a city in the Henan province of the Peoples Republic of China, located along the Huang He, 70 km from Zhengzhou, the provincial capital. ... Henan (Chinese: 河南; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ho-nan), is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located in the central part of the country. ... Alternative meaning: Song Dynasty (420-479) The Song dynasty (Chinese: 宋朝) was a ruling dynasty in China from 960-1279. ... Hangzhou (Chinese: 杭州; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hang-chou) is a sub-provincial city in China, and the capital of Zhejiang province. ... Zhejiang (Chinese: 浙江; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Che-chiang; Postal System Pinyin: Chehkiang or Chekiang) is a eastern coastal province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Alternative meaning: Song Dynasty (420-479) The Song dynasty (Chinese: 宋朝) was a ruling dynasty in China from 960-1279. ... Nanjing (Chinese: 南京; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Nan-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Nanking), is the capital of Chinas Jiangsu province and a city with a prominent place in Chinese history and culture. ... Jiangsu (Simplified Chinese: 江苏; Traditional Chinese: 江蘇; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chiang-su; Postal System Pinyin: Kiangsu) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located along the east coast of the country. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Events March 21 - Battle of Beaugé. A small French force surprises and defeats an English force under Thomas, Duke of Clarence, a brother of Henry V of England, in Normandy. ... Forbidden City Courtyard The Forbidden City or Forbidden Palace (Chinese: 紫禁城; Pinyin: ; literally Purple Forbidden City), located at the exact center of the ancient City of Beijing, was the imperial palace during the mid-Ming and the Qing dynasties. ...   Beijing? (Chinese: 北京; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Pei-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Peking) is the capital city of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Qing Dynasty (Manchu: daicing gurun; Chinese: 清朝; pinyin: qÄ«ng cháo; Wade-Giles: ching chao), sometimes known as the Manchu Dynasty, was founded by the Manchu clan Aisin Gioro, in what is today northeast China expanded into China proper and the surrounding territories of Inner Asia, establishing... Events March 21 - Battle of Beaugé. A small French force surprises and defeats an English force under Thomas, Duke of Clarence, a brother of Henry V of England, in Normandy. ... 1924 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... China is the worlds oldest continuous major civilization, with written records dating back about 3,500 years and with 5,000 years being commonly used by Chinese as the age of their civilization. ... The Qing Dynasty (Manchu: daicing gurun; Chinese: 清朝; pinyin: qÄ«ng cháo; Wade-Giles: ching chao), sometimes known as the Manchu Dynasty, was founded by the Manchu clan Aisin Gioro, in what is today northeast China expanded into China proper and the surrounding territories of Inner Asia, establishing... The Imperial Gardens as they once stood The Old Summer Palace, known in China as the Gardens of Perfect Brightness (Chinese: 圆明园 / 圓明園; pinyin: ), and originally called the Imperial Gardens (Chinese: 御園; pinyin: ), was an extremely large complex of palaces and gardens 8 km (5 miles) northwest of the walls of Beijing, built...   Beijing? (Chinese: 北京; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Pei-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Peking) is the capital city of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ...


These gardens were made up of three gardens: the Garden of Perfect Brightness proper, the Garden of Eternal Spring (長春園), and the Elegant Spring Garden (綺春園); they covered a huge area of 3.5 km² (865 acres), almost 5 times the size of the Forbidden City, and 8 times the size of the Vatican City. comprising hundreds of halls, pavilions, temples, galleries, gardens, lakes, etc. Several famous landscapes of southern China had been reproduced in the Imperial Gardens, hundreds of invaluable Chinese art masterpieces and antiquities were stored in the halls, making the Imperial Gardens one of the largest museum in the world. Some unique copies of literary work and compilations were also stored inside the Imperial Gardens. In 1860, during the Second Opium War, the British and French expeditionary forces looted the Old Summer Palace. Then on October 18, 1860, in order to "punish" the imperial court, which had refused to allow Western embassies inside Beijing, the British general Lord Elgin- with protestations from the French - purposely ordered to set fire to the huge complex which burned to the ground. It took 3500 British troops to set the entire place ablaze and took three whole days to burn. The burning of the Gardens of Perfect Brightness is still a very sensitive issue in China today. Forbidden City Courtyard The Forbidden City or Forbidden Palace (Chinese: 紫禁城; Pinyin: ; literally Purple Forbidden City), located at the exact center of the ancient City of Beijing, was the imperial palace during the mid-Ming and the Qing dynasties. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Imperial Gardens as they once stood The Old Summer Palace, known in China as the Gardens of Perfect Brightness (Chinese: 圆明园 / 圓明園; pinyin: ), and originally called the Imperial Gardens (Chinese: 御園; pinyin: ), was an extremely large complex of palaces and gardens 8 km (5 miles) northwest of the walls of Beijing, built...   Beijing? (Chinese: 北京; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Pei-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Peking) is the capital city of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... Lord James Bruce Elgin James Bruce, 8th Earl of Elgin and 12th Earl of Kincardine (July 20, 1811 – November 20, 1863) was a British colonial administrator and diplomat, best known as Governor General of the Province of Canada and Viceroy of India. ...


Following this cultural catastrophe, the imperial court was forced to relocate to the old and austere Forbidden City where it stayed until 1924, when the Last Emperor was expelled by a republican army. Empress dowager Cixi (慈禧太后) built the Summer Palace (頤和園 - "The Garden of Nurtured Harmony") near the Old Summer Palace, but on a much smaller scale than the Old Summer Palace. There are currently some projects in China to rebuild the Imperial Gardens, but this appears as a colossal undertaking, and no rebuilding has started yet. Forbidden City Courtyard The Forbidden City or Forbidden Palace (Chinese: 紫禁城; Pinyin: ; literally Purple Forbidden City), located at the exact center of the ancient City of Beijing, was the imperial palace during the mid-Ming and the Qing dynasties. ... 1924 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Aisin-Gioro, Puyi (Henry)¹ (February 7, 1906 - October 17, 1967) was the Xuantong Emperor (宣統皇帝) of China between 1908 and 1924 (ruling emperor between 1908 and 1912, and non-ruling emperor between 1912 and 1924), the tenth (and last) emperor of the Manchu Qing Dynasty to rule over China. ... Empress Dowager Cixi Empress Dowager Cixi (Chinese: 慈禧太后; Wade-Giles: Tzu-hsi) (November 29, 1835–November 15, 1908), popularly known in China as the Western Empress Dowager (西太后), and officially known posthumously as Empress Xiaoqin Xian (孝欽顯皇后), was a powerful and charismatic figure who was the de facto ruler... The Summer Palace in Beijing The Summer Palace or Yiheyuan (Chinese: 颐和园/頤和園; Pinyin: ; literally Garden of Nurtured Harmony ) is a palace in Beijing, China. ... The Imperial Gardens as they once stood The Old Summer Palace, known in China as the Gardens of Perfect Brightness (Chinese: 圆明园 / 圓明園; pinyin: ), and originally called the Imperial Gardens (Chinese: 御園; pinyin: ), was an extremely large complex of palaces and gardens 8 km (5 miles) northwest of the walls of Beijing, built... The Imperial Gardens as they once stood The Old Summer Palace, known in China as the Gardens of Perfect Brightness (Chinese: 圆明园 / 圓明園; pinyin: ), and originally called the Imperial Gardens (Chinese: 御園; pinyin: ), was an extremely large complex of palaces and gardens 8 km (5 miles) northwest of the walls of Beijing, built...


Czech Republic

Prague (Czech: Praha, see also other names) is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. ...

Denmark

Amalienborg Palace (Danish: Amalienborg Slot) is the home of the Danish royal family, and has been since the fire of Christiansborg in 1794. ... Frederiksborg Palace Frederiksborg Palace, in Hillerød, was built as a royal residence for King Christian IV from 1602 to 1620 by the Dutch architects Hans and Lorents van Steenwinckel. ...

England

Addington Palace is a largely 18th-century Palace in Addington near Croydon, south London. ... The Palace of Beaulieu was located in Essex, UK, north of Chelmsford. ... Blenheim Palace, The Great Court. ... The Bridewell Palace was rebuilt for Henry VIII in 1515-1520 on the site of an earlier palace. ... Eltham Palace is an Art Deco house in Eltham, London, currently owned by English Heritage and open to the public. ... Hampton Court Palace with the Union Jack flying. ... Lambeth Palaces gatehouse Lambeth Palace is the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury, located in Lambeth, beside the Thames opposite the Palace of Westminster. ... Nonsuch Palace was a Tudor royal palace that was built by Henry VIII in Surrey, on the location of Cuddington, near Epsom (the church and village of Cuddington were destroyed to create the plot for the palace). ... The Palace of Placentia was an English Royal Palace built by Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester in 1428, in Greenwich, London on the banks of the River Thames. ... A royal residence 1327-1649, on The Green, Richmond-upon-Thames, Surrey. ... The Tower of London, seen from the river, with a view of the water gate called Traitors Gate. ... The Palace of Westminster lies on the bank of the River Thames in the heart of London. ... Events Leo IX becomes pope. ... Events June 25 - Augsburg confession presented to Charles V of Holy Roman Empire. ... The Palace of Whitehall was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698 when all except Inigo Jones 1622 Banqueting House was destroyed by fire. ... Events June 25 - Augsburg confession presented to Charles V of Holy Roman Empire. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... The south facade of the main block of Kensington Palace. ... Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ... Main entrance of St. ... Events March 8 - William III died; Princess Anne Stuart becomes Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Clarence House, London Clarence House is a royal home in London, situated in The Mall. ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Winchester Palace by Wenceslas Hollar, 1660. ...

France

The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... // Events World Population 300 million. ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1358 1359 1360 1361 1362 - 1363 - 1364 1365 1366 1367 1368 See also: 1363 state leaders Events Magnus II, King of Sweden, is deposed by Albert of Mecklenburg. ... The Paris Hall of Justice (Palais de Justice de Paris) is located in the Île de la Cité in central Paris, France. ... The Cour de cassation is the main court of last resort in France. ... I.M. Peis Louvre Pyramid: the entrance to the galleries lies below the glass pyramid The Louvre Museum (Musée du Louvre) in Paris, France, is one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1359 1360 1361 1362 1363 - 1364 - 1365 1366 1367 1368 1369 See also: 1364 state leaders Events Foundation of the Jagiellonian University in Krakow (Cracow) The Breton War of Succession... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The main courtyard of the Louvre. ... Up to 1871 the Tuileries Palace was a palace in Paris, France, on the right bank of the River Seine. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Categories: France-related stubs | Palaces in France | French government ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1874 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1940 was a leap year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1946 was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Gardens of the Palais-Royal: The illustration, from an 1863 guide to Paris, enlarges the apparent scale. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... For other uses of Richelieu, see Richelieu (disambiguation). ... Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638–September 1, 1715) reigned as King of France and King of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death. ... Anne of Austria Anne of Austria (September 22, 1601 _ January 20, 1666) was Queen Consort of France and Regent for her son, Louis XIV of France. ... Cardinal Jules Mazarin, French diplomat and statesman Jules Mazarin, born Giulio Raimondo Mazzarino; but best known as Cardinal Mazarin (July 14, 1602 – March 9, 1661) served as the chief minister of France from 1642, until his death. ... Duke of Orléans is one of the most important titles in the French peerage, dating back at least to the 14th century. ... In France, the Conseil dÉtat (English: Council of State and sometimes Counsel of State) is an organ of the French national government. ... The Palais Bourbon, front The Palais Bourbon, a palace located in Paris, France, is the seat of the French National Assembly, the lower legislative chamber of the French government. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The Palais Bourbon, front The French National Assembly (French: Assemblée nationale) is one of the two houses of the bicameral Parliament of France under the Fifth Republic. ... The Luxembourg Palace in the 6th arrondissement of Paris, north of the Luxembourg Garden, is where the French Senate meets. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The Senate (in French : le Sénat) is the upper house of the Parliament of France. ... The Champeux Gate of the Palais des Papes The Palais des Papes in Avignon, France is one of the largest and most important medieval Gothic buildings in Europe. ... Coat of arms of Avignon Avignon (pronounced in IPA, Provençal: Avignoun) is a commune in southern France with some 88,300 inhabitants in the city itself and 155,500 in the Greater Avignon area. ... This is a list of Popes of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Location within France Street in the centre of Dijon Dijon (   pronunciation?) is a city in eastern France, the préfecture (administrative capital) of the Côte-dOr département (county) and of the Bourgogne région. ... The following is a list of the Dukes of Burgundy Richard of Autun, the Justicier (880–921) Rudolph of Burgundy (king of France from 923) (921–923) Hugh the Black (923–952) Gilbert of Chalon (952–956) Odo of Paris (956-965) Otto-Henry the Great (965–1002) Otto-William... Place Stanislas - Gate of Amphitrite Nancy (pronounced in French) is a city and commune which is the préfecture (capital) of the Meurthe-et-Moselle département, in the Lorraine région of northeastern France. ... The Duchy of Lorraine was an independent state for most of the period of time between 843 to 1739. ... Nevers is a commune of central France, the préfecture (capital) of the Nièvre département, in the former province of Nivernais. ... Location within France Perpignan (Catalan Perpinyà) is a commune and the préfecture (administrative capital city) of the Pyrénées-Orientales département in southern France, and was the capital of the former province of Roussillon (French Catalonia). ... The Kingdom of Majorca (also Kingdom of Mallorca) was created by James I of Aragon (Jaume I, The Conqueror) as a vassal kingdom of the Kingdom of Aragon. ...

Germany

Palace of the Republic, Minsk, Belarus
Palace of the Republic, Minsk, Belarus

German has two contrasting words, parallel to French usage: Schloss which connotes a seat that is enclosed by walls, a fastness or keep, and Palast, a more conscious borrowing, with the usual connotations of splendor. The former Holy Roman Empire, a congeries of independent territories, is filled with residences that were seats of government and had every right to be called "palace." Even the Socialist government of the former East Germany met in the Palast der Republik (built in 1976). Image File history File links The Palace of the Republic at October Square. ... Image File history File links The Palace of the Republic at October Square. ... Victory Square, the central place of Minsk Minsk (Belarusian: Мінск (official spelling in Belarus), Менск; Russian: ) is the capital and a major city of Belarus with a population of 1. ... This page is about the Germanic empire. ... For the historical eastern German provinces, see Historical Eastern Germany East Germany, officially the German Democratic Republic (GDR), German Deutsche Demokratische Republik (DDR), was a Communist Party-led state that existed from 1949 to 1990 in the former Soviet occupation zone of Germany. ...

Charlottenburg is an area in Berlin, formerly a borough now part of Charlottenburg_Wilmersdorf. ...   Berlin? (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... Ludwigsburg Palace and Baroque Gardens (near Stuttgart, Germany) Courtyard of Ludwigsburg Palace Favorite Palace Ludwigsburg Monrepos Palace Ludwigsburg Ludwigsburg Palace is Germanys largest baroque palace and features an enormous baroque garden. ... Ludwigsburg is a city in Germany, about 12 km north of Stuttgarts city center, by the river Neckar. ... Basic information Country: Germany Federal state: Land Baden-Württemberg Regions: Rhein-Neckar District: Independent municipality Population: 324,787 (Mai 2005) Additional information Area: 144. ... View from the Park The Nymphenburg Palace (German: Schloss Nymphenburg) is a Baroque palace in Munich, Bavaria, Germany. ... Munich: Frauenkirche and Town Hall steeple Munich (German: München (pronounced listen) is the state capital of the German state of Bavaria. ... With an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ... Schwetzingen is a German city lying in the northwest of Baden-Württemberg, around 10 km southwest of Heidelberg and 15 km southeast of Mannheim. ... Map of Germany showing Heidelberg Heidelberg (halfway between Stuttgart and Frankfurt) is a city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... Aerial view of the Zwinger Palace The Zwinger Palace in Dresden, Germany was designed by Matthäus Daniel Pöppelmann in 1722, and became the star attraction in that citys rich cultural heritage. ... Brühls Terrace Brühlsche Terrasse and the Frauenkirche   Dresden? IPA: is the capital city of the German federal state of Saxony, is situated in a valley on the river Elbe. ... Regensburg (English formerly Ratisbon, Latin Ratisbona, Czech Řezno) is a city (population 146,824 in 2002) in Bavaria, south-east Germany, located at the confluence of the Danube and Regen rivers, at the northernmost bend in the Danube. ...

Indonesia

  • Kraton Ngayogyakarta Hadiningrat
  • Kraton Surakarta Hadiningrat
  • Pagaruyung Palace
  • Puro Mangkunegaran
  • Puro Pakualaman

Italy

Caserta, near Naples was certainly the largest palace and probably the largest building erected in Europe in the 18th century. ... Early 20th century photograph of the Palazzo Pitti, then still known as La Residenza Reale following the residency of King Emmanuel II between 1865 to 1871 when Florence was the capital of Italy. ... Founded 59 BC as Florentia Region Tuscany Mayor Leonardo Domenici (Democratici di Sinistra) Area  - City Proper  102 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 356,000 almost 500,000 3,453/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Latitude Longitude 43°47 N 11°15 E www. ... Palazzo della Signoria Palazzo della Signoria was the original name of the Palazzo Vecchio, before the government of the Republic of Florence was moved to the Uffizi under Cosimo I de Medici. ... Palazzo del Te, Mantua (1524 - 1534). ... A mid-18th century engraving of Palazzo Farnese by Giuseppe Vasi Palazzo Farnese, Rome (housing the French Embassy), is the most imposing Italian palace of the sixteenth century (Sir Banister Fletcher) (1). ... Doges Palace The Doges Palace (Ital. ... Location within Italy Venice (Italian: Venezia), the city of canals, is the capital of the region of Veneto and of the province of Venice, 45°26′ N 12°19′ E, population 271,663 (census estimate 2004-01-01). ... Palazzo Barbarigo is situated on the Grand Canal in Venice. ... Ca dOro façade overlooking the Grand Canal Ca dOro (correctly the Palazzo Santa Sofia) is one of the most beautiful palazzos on the Grand Canal in Venice, Italy and surely the most famous. ... The Palazzo Foscari (known in Venice as Ca Foscari) was built on the waterfront of Venices Grand Canal circa 1437 by the Doge Francesco Foscari, who required its design to demonstrate his wealth and power. ... Ca Rezzonico is a palazzo on the Grand Canal in Venice. ... An etching of the Hill, crowned by the mass of the Palazzo del Quirinale, from a series I Sette Colli di Roma antica e moderna published in 1827 by Luigi Rossini (1790 - 1857): his view, from the roof of the palazzo near the Trevi Fountain that now houes the Accademia... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Democratici di Sinistra) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,546,807 almost 4,000,000 1... Panorama of Urbino with the cathedral and the palazzo ducale Urbino is a city in the Marche in Italy, southwest of Pesaro, a World Heritage Site with a great cultural history during the Renaissance as the seat of Federico da Montefeltro. ...

Japan

Nijubashi Bridge at the Imperial Palace. ... The modern skyline of Tokyo is highly decentralized. ... Imperial Court in Kyoto was the nominal ruling government of Japan since 794 until the Meiji Era, in which the court was moved to Tokyo and was integrated into the Meiji government. ... This page is about the city Kyoto. ... Nijubashi Bridge at the Imperial Palace. ... The State Guest-House (Geihinkan; 迎賓館) is a facility in which the government of Japan accommodates visiting state dignitaries. ... The modern skyline of Tokyo is highly decentralized. ... This page is about the city Kyoto. ...

Korea

From Goguryeo Dynasty

  • Guknaesung, Imperial Palace, Jian
  • Anhakgung, Imperial Palace, Pyeongyang

From Baekje Dynasty Jian (劍 Pinyin jiàn, Wade-Giles chien4, Cantonese gim, Korean geom, Japanese ken) is a double-edged straight sword used during the last 2,500 years in China. ...

From Shilla Dynasty Puyo is the capital of Pastaza, a province in Ecuador. ...

From Parhae Dynasty Gyeongju is a city and prominent tourist destination in eastern South Korea. ...

  • Hwanggung, Yongchunbu

From Taebong Dynasty

  • Gungyegung, Cheolwon

From Goryeo Dynasty

  • Manwoldae, Imperial Palace, Gaesung

These are from Joseon Dynasty

Seoul (서울,   listen?) is the capital of South Korea and is one of the most populous cities in the world, located in the northwestern part of the country on the Han River. ... Deoksugung (Deoksu Palace) is a walled compound of palaces that was inhabited by various Korean royalty until the Japanese occupation near the turn of the 20th century. ... Seoul (서울,   listen?) is the capital of South Korea and is one of the most populous cities in the world, located in the northwestern part of the country on the Han River. ... Changdeokgung (Changdeok Palace) is a palace located in Seoul, South Korea. ... Seoul (서울,   listen?) is the capital of South Korea and is one of the most populous cities in the world, located in the northwestern part of the country on the Han River. ... Changgyeonggung is a palace located in Seoul, South Korea. ... Seoul (서울,   listen?) is the capital of South Korea and is one of the most populous cities in the world, located in the northwestern part of the country on the Han River. ... Seoul (서울,   listen?) is the capital of South Korea and is one of the most populous cities in the world, located in the northwestern part of the country on the Han River. ...

Philippines

Depiction of the Malacañang Palace at the back of the 20-peso bill. ...

Romania

The Palace of the Parliament (Palatul Parlamentului) in Bucharest, Romania is reputed to be the largest building in Europe at 350,000 m². It is probably the third largest building in the world right after The Pentagon and the Merchandise Mart. ...

Russia

Andreevsky Hall of the Grand Kremlin Palace in 1849 The Grand Kremlin Palace (Большой Кремлевский дворец Bolshoi Kremlyovski Dvorets), also translated Great Kremlin Palace, was built from 1837 to 1851 in Moscow, Russia on the site of the estate of the Grand Princes, which had been established in the 14th... The Palace of the Facets (Грановитая Палата) is part of what is now known as the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia. ... The construction of the Terem Palace in the Moscow Kremlin began in the period 1635-1636. ... Located on the bank of the Neva River, the Winter Palace in St. ... Summer Palace (Russia) - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... North side - carriage courtyard South side - garden entrance The Catherine palace is the summer palace of the Russias Tsarina Catherine the Great, located in the town Tsarskoye Selo 25 kilometers east of St. ... Peterhof: the Samson Fountain and Sea Channel Peterhof, (originally Piterhof, Dutch: Peters Court) is a series of palaces and gardens, laid out on the orders of Tsar Peter the Great, and sometimes called the Russian Versailles. It is located about 20 km west and 6 km south of St... Oranienbaum can refer to: The Russian royal residence of Oranienbaum The former name of the adjacent town of Lomonosov Oranienbaum, a town in Saxony-Anhalt, Germany This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Pavlovsk (Russian: Павловск) is a town situated in the Leningrad oblast, Russia, 30 km from St. ... Gatchina is the city of 84900 inhabitants in the Leningrad oblast of the Russian Federation, 45 km south of St Petersburg by the road leading to Pskov. ... The Constantine Palace in 1921 Strelna (Russian: Стрельна) is a historic village situated about halfway between Saint Petersburg and Peterhof and overlooking the shore of the Gulf of Finland. ... The Alexander Palace is a former imperial palace in Russia. ... View of Kuskovo in 1839 Kuskovo is an extensive estate, or manor, of the Counts Sheremetev, originally situated several miles to the east of Moscow but now forming a part of the East District of that city. ...

Scotland

Dalkeith Palace in January 2004 Dalkeith Palace in Dalkeith, Midlothian, Scotland, is the former seat of the Duke of Buccleuch. ... The title of Duke of Buccleuch (IPA ) was created in the Peerage of Scotland on 20 April 1663 for the Duke of Monmouth, eldest illegitimate son of Charles II of England, who had married Anne Scott, 4th Countess of Buccleuch. ... Dunfermline Palace is a former Scottish royal palace in Dunfermline, Fife. ... Falkland Palace is a former Scottish royal palace in Falkland, Fife. ... Hamilton Palace, the former seat of the Dukes of Hamilton, was first built in 1695 and stood until its demolition in 1921. ... The Mausoleum of the Dukes of Hamilton sits in the grounds of the old Hamilton Palace in Hamilton The Duke of Hamilton is a title in the Peerage of Scotland created in 1643. ... A 19th century view of Holyrood Palace from Calton Hill. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Linlithgow Palace The ruins of Linlithgow Palace are situated in the town of Linlithgow, West Lothian, Scotland, 15 miles west of Edinburgh. ... Scone Palace is a palace near Perth, in Scotland built 1802-1812. ... The Earl of Mansfield and Mansfield is a peer in the Peerage of Great Britain, holding two separate creations of the title of Earl of Mansfield in that peerage, the first created in 1776 and the second in 1792. ...

Spain

  • Palaces and Royal Residences (Casa Real de España)

Palacio Real de Madrid The Palacio Real de Madrid (Royal Palace of Madrid) is the official residence of the King of Spain, located in the Spanish capital of Madrid. ... El Escorial is an immense palace, monastery, museum, and library complex located at San Lorenzo de El Escorial (also San Lorenzo del Escorial), a town 45 kilometres (28 miles) northwest of Madrid in the autonomous community of Madrid in Spain. ... The Palacio de la Zarzuela is a residence of the King of Spain. ... The Palacio Real de Aranjuez is a residence of the King of Spain, one of the Spanish royal sites. ...

Turkey

In Turkish, a palace is a saray. Sarai is a New media initiative of CSDS Centre for the Study of Developing Societies. ...

Indonesia, Sumatra - Pagaruyung Palace
Enlarge
Indonesia, Sumatra - Pagaruyung Palace

The Pagaruyung Palace from the Minangkabau region of West Sumatra. ... The Pagaruyung Palace from the Minangkabau region of West Sumatra. ... The kiosks. ... A view of the Dolmabahçe from the Bosphorus with modern Istanbul in the background The famous Crystal Staircase The main hall The Dolmabahçe Palace (Dolmabahçe Sarayı) is a palace in Istanbul, located at the western, European, side of the Bosphorus. ...

Ukraine

Mariyinsky Palace President Yushchenko talks with President Madl. ...

United States

Iolani Palace was the official residence of King David Kalakaua and Queen Julia Kapiolani and then Queen Liliuokalani and Prince Consort John Owen Dominis. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... New Bern is a city located in Craven County, North Carolina where the Trent River and the Neuse River converge. ...

Contrast: White House

The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. ...

Vatican City

of the Vatican City The Apostolic Palace , also called the Papal Palace or the Palace of the Vatican, is the official residence of the Pope in the Vatican City. ...


List of non-residential Palaces

Some large impressive buildings which were not meant to be residences, but are nonetheless called palaces, include:

Note, too, the French use of the word palais in such constructions as palais des congrès (convention centre) and palais de justice (courthouse). The facade of the original Crystal Palace side view of the Crystal Palace A huge iron and glass building, The Crystal Palace was one of the wonders of 19th Century Britain, if not the world. ... Alexandra Palace from the east Alexandra Palace was built on a hill in Muswell Hill in North London in 1873 as a public entertainment centre. ... The Uffizi Gallery (Italian: Galleria degli Uffizi) is a palace or palazzo in Florence, holding one of the oldest and most famous art museums in the world. ... Palau de la Música Catalana The Palau de la Música Catalana (Palace of Catalan Music) in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, is a concert hall built between 1905 and 1908, designed by the Catalan architect Lluís Domènech i Montaner. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Palace Entertainment (133 words)
With over 10,000,000 annual visitors, Palace is among the largest operators of amusement parks in the U.S. Palace Entertainment is the largest family amusement and waterpark operator in the U.S. with 32 parks and over 10 million visitors annually.
Palace Entertainment waterparks include; Wet ‘N Wild in Greensboro NC, Raging Waters in San Dimas and San Jose CA, Splish Splash in Riverhead NY, Big Kahuna’s in Destin FL, Water Country in Portsmouth NH, Mountain Creek in Vernon NJ and Wild Waters in Ocala FL.
Palace Entertainment also owns Boomers, Castle Park, Silver Springs, Malibu Grand Prix, Mountasia, and Speedzone family entertainment parks in CA, TX, FL, GA, and NY.
Cartoon Dolls - Doll maker and Dress up games to dress up dolls and avatars - Making Cartoon Dolls @ TDP (412 words)
We have forums and chat dedicated to discussions and problems people have with creating dolls.
The Doll Palace has a tremendous collection of doll graphics and pictures.
Our new doll characters include Fantasy and Fairy Dolls, Gothic Dolls and Celebrity dolls that you can review and get the HTML doll code for your own site or profile.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m