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Encyclopedia > Paisley, Scotland
Paisley
Image:RenfrewshirePaisley.png
Paisley's location locally and nationally
Demographics
Population: 74,170 (1991 Census)
Administration
Local Government Region: Renfrewshire
Nation: Scotland
Geography
Traditional County: Renfrewshire
Former Region: Strathclyde
Post Office and Telephone
Post Town: Paisley
Postcode: PA1 & PA2
Dialling Code: 0141 & 01505

Paisley (Pàislig in Scottish Gaelic) is a large town, and former royal burgh in the Central Lowlands of Scotland. It is the administrative capital of the Renfrewshire authority. I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The 32 council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities. ... Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority regions in Scotland. ... One of the most influential doctrines in history is that all humans are divided into groups called nations. ... Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in Scotland Abbeys and priories in Scotland Gardens in Scotland... The traditional counties of Scotland are historic and cutural divisions of Scotland. ... Before 1975 local government in Scotland was organised on the county system. ... Strathclyde (Srath Chluaidh in Gaelic) was one of the regional council areas of Scotland from 1974 to 1996. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK and Australian postal codes are known as postcodes. ... Subscriber trunk dialling (STD) (also known as subscriber toll dialling) is an obsolete term for the UK telephone system allowing subscribers to dial trunk calls without operator assistance. ... Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig; IPA: ) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... This is a link page for burghs (pronounced burras) in Scotland. ... The Scottish Lowlands, although not officially a geographical area of the country, in normal usage is generally meant to include those parts of Scotland not referred to as the Highlands (or Gaidhealtachd), that is, everywhere due south and east of a line (the Highland Boundary Fault) between Stonehaven and Bowling... Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in Scotland Abbeys and priories in Scotland Gardens in Scotland... Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority regions in Scotland. ...


The town is situated on the northern edge of the Gleniffer Braes on the banks of the River Cart, approximately 8 miles west-southwest of Glasgow. Glasgow International Airport, despite its name, is in fact located in Renfrewshire, and sits equidistantly between Paisley and neighbouring Renfrew. The River Cart is a tributary of the River Clyde, Scotland, which it joins from the west roughly midway between Erskine and Renfrew. ... Glasgows location in Scotland Glasgow (or Glaschu in Gaelic) is Scotlands largest city and unitary council, situated on the River Clyde in the countrys west central lowlands. ... Glasgow International Airport (IATA: GLA, ICAO: EGPF) (sometimes referred to as Glasgow Abbotsinch International Airport), located 13 km (8 miles) west of Glasgow, near the towns of Paisley and Renfrew, is the largest international airport in Scotland, and number five in the UK. The airport is owned by BAA plc... Renfrew (Rinn Friù in Scottish Gaelic) is a small town, located six miles west of Glasgow on the west coast of Scotland. ...


Paisley is the largest town in Scotland (below four of the country's five main cities). Towns and settlements surrounding Paisley include:

Renfrew (Rinn Friù in Scottish Gaelic) is a small town, located six miles west of Glasgow on the west coast of Scotland. ... Ralston (Baile Raghnaill in Scottish Gaelic) is a small, suburban settlement in Renfrewshire, Scotland, bordering onto the eastern edge of the royal burgh of Paisley. ... Barrhead (Ceann a Bhàirr in Scottish Gaelic) is a small town in East Renfrewshire, Scotland, 8 miles southwest of Glasgow on the edge of the Gleniffer Braes. ... East Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... Johnstone (Baile Eòin in Scottish Gaelic) is a town in Renfrewshire, Scotland, three miles west of neighbouring Paisley. ... Elderslie (Ach-na-Feàrna in Scottish Gaelic) is a small town or village in Renfrewshire, Scotland. ... For other uses of the word see: Linwood (disambiguation) Linwood is a small town in Renfrewshire, Scotland, 14 miles south-west of Glasgow, which saw an explosion in its population during the middle of the 20th century due to the mass exodus of people from the Glasgow slums. ...

History

Formerly known as Paislay (and still known as Pàislig in Gaelic), the town's name is thought to be derived from the old Brythonic word, Pasgill, meaning "pasture". Brythonic is one of two major divisions of Insular Celtic languages (the other being Goidelic). ...


Historically, Paisley has monastic origins, due to a site near a waterfall, where it is said a chapel was established by the Irish monk, Saint Mirin. It is also said to have been the site of a Roman encampment in the Kingdom of Strathclyde, though this has never been proven. The priory however, prevailed and in 1219, it was promoted to Abbey status. The building of Paisley Abbey can still be seen. An Irish monk who died circa 620, also known as Mirin of Benchor (now called Bangor), Merinus, Merryn and Meadhran. ... Principal sites in Roman Britain Roman Britain is the term applied to that part of Britain lying within the Roman Empire (which never extended to the whole island). ... Strathclyde (Welsh: Ystrad Clud) was one of the kingdoms of ancient Scotland in the post-Roman period. ... // Events Saint Francis of Assisi introduces Catholicism into Egypt, during the Fifth Crusade The Flag of Denmark fell from the sky during the Battle of Lyndanisse Ongoing events Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Births Christopher I of Denmark (died 1259) Frederick II of Austria (died 1246) Guillaume de Gisors, supposedly the... An abbey (from the Latin abbatia, which is derived from the Syriac abba, father), is a Christian monastery or convent, under the government of an Abbot or an Abbess, who serve as the spiritual father or mother of the community. ... Location Paisley Abbey is sited on the East bank of the river Cart in the center of the town of Paisley, Renfrewshire. ...


Not long after the time of Robert the Bruce and the Stewarts (mid-1400s), Paisley coalesced under James II's wish that the lands should become a single regality and, as a result, markets, trading and commerce began to flourish. Robert I, King of Scots, usually known as Robert the Bruce (July 11, 1274 – June 7, 1329, reigned 1306 – 1329), was, according to a modern biographer (Geoffrey Barrow), a great hero who lived in a minor country. ... James II of Scotland (October 16, 1430 – August 3, 1460) was king of Scotland from 1437 to 1460. ...


Many trades sprung up and the first schools were established; and by the mid-nineteenth century, weaving had become the town's main industry. Paisley is still very well-known for the Paisley Shawl and its distinctive pattern, which originated around this time. Paisley is a droplet-shaped vegetal motif, similar to half of the Tai Chi symbol, the Indian bodhi tree leaf, or the mango tree. ...


Mainly on account of the weaving fraternity, Paisley gained notoriety as being a literate and somewhat radical town, although it could be argued in a fiercely positive direction, by this time there was a real mixture of religious opinions and healthy drink-fuelled debate raged at night amongst the weavers, poets, merchants, masons and others. The poet Robert Tannahill lived in this setting, working as a weaver. The weavers of Paisley were also active in the Radical War of 1820. Robert Tannahill (June 3, 1774 - May 17, 1810) was a Scottish poet known as the Paisley Poet. A substantial portion of the introduction to William Motherwells Harp of Renfrewshire is dedicated to discussion of Tannahills uneventful and even-tenored existence. ... The Radical War, also known as the Scottish Insurrection of 1820, was a week of strikes and unrest, a culmination of Radical demands for reform in the United Kingdom which had become prominent in the early years of the French Revolution, but had then been repressed during the long Napoleonic...


Currently Paisley suffers many problems common to towns throughout central Scotland. In the last 10 years, the development of out-of-town retail sites, in combination with a poorly-planned town centre pedestrianisation and an unfathomable one-way road system around the town centre, has led to a loss of many retail outlets and poor access to the town centre. The once bustling High Street of Paisley is a shadow of its former self. This is a result of unimaginative local government-sanctioned town planning. Many of the town's citizens feel that they deserve better.

Paisley Abbey
Paisley Abbey

St. Mirren F.C., the local Paisley Scottish First Division football (soccer) team, have currently been given planning permission to move to a new 10,000 seater stadium from their home on the towns Love Street to one located on Greenhill Road to help regenerate the deprived Ferguslie Park area. Despite their last major success being the Scottish Cup of 1987 where thousands crowded the streets to see the team and having only enjoyed a brief spell in the SPL in recent memory, the support in the town for the team is still good and attendances are among the highest in the First Division. They have a very active youth development system and are part of the social fabric of the town. This was demonstrated when at a Renfrewshire Council planning comittee board meeting on the new stadium and supermarket to replace Love Street came to be heard. With the initial recommendation that St.Mirren be denied permission for the supermarket but allowed the stadium, something that threatened the future of the club due to the supermarket being only solution to clear its debts, some 300 buddies stood outside the final meeting of Renfrewshire Council in Cotton Street on a dry Tuesday Morning in support. The club was granted permission at this meeting with a majority vote of 9-5 in favour. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (946x1024, 189 KB)Paisley Abbey viewed from Forbs Place. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (946x1024, 189 KB)Paisley Abbey viewed from Forbs Place. ... Saint Mirren Football Club (usually referred to simply as St. ...


Paisley folk, or 'Buddies', as they refer to themselves, are very proud of their town and are fiercely loyal to it. In recent years, support for full city status has been gathering momentum. The town already meets the criteria for city status, boasting both a cathedral and a university. Rivalry with the town's larger and more dominant west coast neighbour, Glasgow, runs strong, and to call a Buddie a Glaswegian is met with a similar reaction to a Scot being called English. Buddies are also very friendly and pragmatic people. Perhaps traces of the radical working class thinkers remain. A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy (such as the Roman Catholic Church or the Lutheran or Anglican churches), which serves as the central church of a bishopric. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation) George Square and Glasgows City Chambers Glasgow is Scotlands largest city, located on the River Clyde in West Central Scotland. ...


Areas of Paisley

The town of Paisley is divided into the following districts and communities:

  • Arkleston, Auchentorlie
  • Blackhall, Braehead
  • Castlehead, Charleston
  • Dykebar
  • East End
  • Ferguslie Park, Foxbar
  • Gallowhill, Glenburn, Glenfield, Gockston
  • Hawkhead, Hunterhill
  • Lochfield
  • Meikleriggs, Millarston
  • Nethercommon, Nethercraigs
  • Oakshaw
  • Potterhill
  • Saucel, Seedhill, Shortroods, South End, Stanely
  • Thornly Park, Todholm
  • West End, Whitehaugh, Williamsburgh

Charleston is an area in Paisley, a town in Scotland. ...

See also

  • Paisley Photo Gallery

  Results from FactBites:
 
Paisley, Scotland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (730 words)
Paisley (Pàislig in Scottish Gaelic) is a large town, and former royal burgh in the Central Lowlands of Scotland.
Paisley is still very well-known for the Paisley Shawl and its distinctive pattern, which originated around this time.
Paisley folk, or 'Buddies', as they refer to themselves, are very proud of their town and are fiercely loyal to it.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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