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Encyclopedia > Paisley
Paisley
Scottish Gaelic: Pàislig


Paisley Town Hall Image File history File links Question_book-new. ... Paisley wallpaper Paisley or Paisley pattern is a droplet-shaped vegetal motif of Persian origin, similar to half of the Yin yang symbol, or the leaf of the Indian bodhi tree or the mango tree. ... Paisley, Renfrewshire, is a royal burgh in Scotland. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (480 × 640 pixels, file size: 463 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...


Paisley shown within Scotland
Population 72,970 (2004 Estimate)
OS grid reference NS485635
 - Edinburgh 49 mi (79 km) E
 - London 347 mi (558 km) SSE
Council area Renfrewshire
Lieutenancy area Renfrewshire
Constituent country Scotland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town PAISLEY
Postcode district PA1 - PA3
Dialling code 0141 & 01505
Police Strathclyde
Fire Strathclyde
Ambulance Scottish
European Parliament Scotland
UK Parliament Paisley North
Paisley South
Scottish Parliament Paisley North
Paisley South
West of Scotland
List of places: UKScotland

Coordinates: 55°49′00″N 4°25′00″W / 55.833333, -4.433333 Image File history File links Size of this preview: 451 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1154 × 1535 pixel, file size: 661 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... This article is about the country. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... A modern compass card. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... A modern compass card. ... For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas of Scotland which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils which have the option under the Local Government (Gaelic Names) (Scotland) Act 1997 (as chosen by Na h-Eileanan an Iar) of being known... Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority regions in Scotland. ... The Lieutenancy areas of Scotland are the areas used for the ceremonial lords-lieutenant, the monarchs representatives, in Scotland. ... Renfrewshire was a county of Scotland until their abolition in 1975. ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... This article is about the country. ... This list of sovereign states, alphabetically arranged, gives an overview of states around the world with information on the extent of their sovereignty. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The PA postcode area, also known as the Paisley postcode area[1], is a group of postal districts around Appin, Bishopton, Bridge of Orchy, Bridge of Weir, Cairndow, Campbeltown, Colintraive, Dalmally, Dunoon, Erskine, Gourock, Greenock, Inveraray, Isle of Bute, Isle of Coll, Isle of Colonsay, Isle of Gigha, Isle of... +44 redirects here. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Strathclyde Police is the police force for the Scottish council areas of Argyll and Bute, City of Glasgow, East Ayrshire, East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, Inverclyde, North Ayrshire North Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, South Ayrshire, South Lanarkshire and West Dunbartonshire. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Strathclyde Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the area of Strathclyde, Scotland, it is the largest fire and rescue service in the Scotland, and one of the largest in Europe. ... Emergency medical services in Scotland are almost all provided by NHS Scotland. ... Two Mercedes-Benz Sprinter-based ambulances of the Scottish Ambulance Service The Scottish Ambulance Service serves all of Scotland and is a special health board funded directly by the health department of the Scottish Executive. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Paisley was a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1832 until 1983, when it was divided into Paisley North and Paisley South. ... Paisley was a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1832 until 1983, when it was divided into Paisley North and Paisley South. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Paisley North is the name of the Scottish parliamentary constituency, which includes the northern portion of the town of Paisley, together with surrounding areas in north, central Renfrewshire. ... Paisley South is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... West of Scotland is one of the eight electoral regions of the Scottish Parliament which were created in 1999. ... List of burghs in Scotland List of cities in the United Kingdom Lists of places within Scottish regions List of places in Orkney List of places in Shetland List of places in the Borders region of Scotland List of places in the Central region of Scotland List of places in... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Paisley (Scottish Gaelic: Pàislig) is a town and former burgh in the west-Central Lowlands of Scotland. It is situated on the northern edge of the Gleniffer Braes, straddling the banks of the River Cart. Paisley is the administrative capital of the Renfrewshire council area, and forms a continuous urban area with Greater Glasgow; Glasgow City Centre being 6.9 miles (11.1 km) to the east. // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... A sign in Linlithgow, Scotland. ... The Central Lowlands are a broad area of low-lying and heavily populated land in central Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... Glennifer Braes is a set of hills to the south of Paisley. ... The River Cart is a tributary of the River Clyde, Scotland, which it joins from the west roughly midway between Erskine and Renfrew. ... Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority regions in Scotland. ... Greater Glasgow is the conurbation that includes and surrounds the city of Glasgow in the west of Scotland. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... “Miles” redirects here. ... “km” redirects here. ...


Paisley was once reckoned to have been the site of the Roman fortification of Vanduara (or Vandogara) chronicled by Ptolemy. The identification of the site of modern Paisley with this fort is based principally on the similarity of the name of the station to the Brythonic Gwen-dwr ('white water') which was inferred to have been the name at that time of the White Cart Water. Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... This article is about the geographer, mathematician and astronomer Ptolemy. ... Brythonic is one of two major divisions of Insular Celtic languages (the other being Goidelic). ...


In the 12th century a priory was founded at Paisley around which a settlement soon grew. Within a hundred years of its foundation the priory had achieved the status of an Abbey. The town became famous during the 18th and 19th centuries for the production of cloth, especially cotton with the distinctive Paisley Pattern. Paisley Abbey Paisley Abbey is a former Cluniac monastery, and current Church of Scotland parish kirk, located on the east bank of the White Cart Water in the centre of the town of Paisley, Renfrewshire, in west central Scotland. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... Paisley wallpaper Paisley or Paisley pattern is a droplet-shaped vegetal motif of Persian origin, similar to half of the Yin yang symbol, or the leaf of the Indian bodhi tree or the mango tree. ...


Paisley is the second largest town in Scotland, after East Kilbride with a population of 72,970 [1], however the difference in population is negligible and will be confirmed in the 2011 Census. Whilst smaller than Scotland's major cities, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen, and Dundee, it forms the sixth-largest settlement in the country, having a greater population than Inverness or Stirling, which both have city status. Paisley forms much of the south-western part of the Greater Glasgow conurbation. East Kilbride (Cille Bhrìghde an Ear in Scottish Gaelic) is a large town in South Lanarkshire, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Scotland. ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... Greater Glasgow is the conurbation that includes and surrounds the city of Glasgow in the west of Scotland. ...

Contents

History

Map of Paisley in 1923
Map of Paisley in 1923

Formerly known as Paislay [2] the burgh's name is of uncertain origin; some sources suggest a derivation either from the Brythonic word, pasgill, 'pasture', or more likely, passeleg - 'basilica', (i.e. major church), itself derived from the Greek basilika. However, some Scottish place-name books suggest "Pæssa's wood/clearing", from the Old English personal name Pæssa and leāh - "clearing, wood". Pasilege (1182) and Paslie (1214) are recorded previous spellings of the name. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 718 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 802 pixel, file size: 215 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) {{Information |Description=Map of Paisley in 1923 |Source=Glasgow Plan |Date=1923 |Author=PD |Permission=PD-UKGov File historyClick on a date/time to view the... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 718 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 802 pixel, file size: 215 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) {{Information |Description=Map of Paisley in 1923 |Source=Glasgow Plan |Date=1923 |Author=PD |Permission=PD-UKGov File historyClick on a date/time to view the... The Brythonic languages (or Brittonic languages) form one of the two branches of the Insular Celtic language family. ...


Paisley has monastic origins. A chapel is said to have been established by the 6th/7th century Irish monk, Saint Mirin at a site near a waterfall on the White Cart Water known as the Hammils. Though Paisley lacks contemporary documentation it may have been, along with Glasgow and Govan, a major religious centre of the Kingdom of Strathclyde. A priory was established in 1163 from the Cluniac priory at Wenlock in Shropshire, England at the behest of Walter Fitzalan (d. 1177) High Steward of Scotland. In 1245 this was raised to the status of an Abbey. The restored Abbey and adjacent 'Place' (palace), constructed out of part of the medieval claustral buildings, survive as a Church of Scotland parish church. One of Scotland's major religious houses, Paisley Abbey was much favoured by the Bruce and Stewart royal families. It is generally accepted that William Wallace the great hero of Scottish independence who inspired the film Braveheart was educated here. King Robert III (1390-1406) was buried in the Abbey. His tomb has not survived, but that of Princess Marjorie Bruce (1296-1316), ancestress of the Stewarts is one of Scotland's few royal monuments to survive the Reformation. A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... An Irish monk who died circa 620, also known as Mirin of Benchor (now called Bangor), Merinus, Merryn and Meadhran. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... , Govan (Baile a Ghobhainn in Gaelic) is a district and former burgh in the southwestern part of the City of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Strathclyde (Welsh: Ystrad Clud) was one of the kingdoms of ancient Scotland in the post-Roman period. ... Cluny nowadays The town of Cluny or Clugny lies in the modern-day département of Saône-et-Loire in the région of France, near Mâcon. ... A priory is an ecclesiastical circumscription run by a prior. ... Much Wenlock is a town in Shropshire, England. ... Shropshire (pronounced /, -/), alternatively known as Salop[6] or abbreviated Shrops[7], is a county in the West Midlands of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Walter Fitzalan born before 1114, died ca. ... The High Steward or Great Steward was given in the 12th century to Walter Fitzalan, whose descendants became the Stewart family. ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... The Church of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: ), known informally by its Scots language name, The Kirk, is the national church of Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... Paisley Abbey Paisley Abbey is a former Cluniac monastery, and current Church of Scotland parish kirk, located on the east bank of the White Cart Water in the centre of the town of Paisley, Renfrewshire, in west central Scotland. ... This article is about the name. ... Stewart is a common surname and is also used as a male first name. ... For other persons named William Wallace, see William Wallace (disambiguation). ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... Robert III (c. ... Marjorie Bruce or Margaret de Bruce (December, 1296 - March 2, 1316) was the oldest daughter of Robert I of Scotland, by his first wife Isabella of Mar. ... This article is about the country. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ...


Paisley coalesced under James II's wish that the lands should become a single regality and, as a result, markets, trading and commerce began to flourish. In 1488 the town's status was raised by James IV to Burgh of barony. James II of Scotland (October 16, 1430 – August 3, 1460) was king of Scotland from 1437 to 1460. ... James IV (March 17, 1473-September 9, 1513) was King of Scots from 1488 to his death. ... A burgh of barony is a type of Scottish town (burgh). ...


Many trades sprang up and the first school was established in 1577 by the Town Council. By the mid-nineteenth century weaving had become the town's principal industry. Paisley is still very well-known for the Paisley Shawl and its distinctive Paisley Pattern which originated around this time. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Paisley wallpaper Paisley or Paisley pattern is a droplet-shaped vegetal motif of Persian origin, similar to half of the Yin yang symbol, or the leaf of the Indian bodhi tree or the mango tree. ...


Through its weaving fraternity, Paisley gained notoriety as being a literate and somewhat radical town, although it could be argued in a fiercely positive direction. By this time there was a real mixture of religious opinions and healthy drink-fuelled debate raged at night amongst the weavers, poets, merchants, masons and others. The poet Robert Tannahill lived in this setting, working as a weaver. The weavers of Paisley were also active in the Radical War of 1820. Robert Tannahill (June 3, 1774 - May 17, 1810) was a Scottish poet known as the Paisley Poet. He was born in Paisley to a weaving family and was apprenticed in the same trade from the age of 12. ... The Radical War, also known as the Scottish Insurrection of 1820, was a week of strikes and unrest, a culmination of Radical demands for reform in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland which had become prominent in the early years of the French Revolution, but had then been...


Geography

Paisley's location locally and nationally.
Paisley's location locally and nationally.
North: Renfrew
West: Elderslie Paisley East: Glasgow
South: Barrhead

The town is surrounded by several large residential areas that were created after the Housing Act of 1946. These include Glenburn (south), Foxbar (south west), Ferguslie Park (north west), Gallowhill (North East) and Hunterhill (South East). Ferguslie Park was named by the Scottish Executive's most deprived area in 2006.[3] Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Renfrew (Rinn Friù in Scottish Gaelic) is a small town and former royal burgh in the Renfrewshire region of Scotland (see main article on the town of Renfrew, Scotland). ... For the suburb of Sydney, Australia, see Elderslie, New South Wales Elderslie (Ach-na-Feàrna in Scottish Gaelic) is a village in Renfrewshire, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Barrhead (Ceann a Bhàirr in Scottish Gaelic although Gaelic is not spoken by natives of this part of Scotland] or Baurheid by some locals) is a town in East Renfrewshire, Scotland, 8 miles southwest of Glasgow on the edge of the Gleniffer Braes. ... Glenburn may refer to: Glenburn, North Dakota Glenburn, Pennsylvania Glenburn, Maine This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... // Foxbar is a housing estate in Paisley just beside Glenburn and Johnstone it is one of the biggest housing schemes in Paisley. ... Ferguslie Park (Feegie Park) is a housing area at the north-west extremity of Paisley in Renfrewshire, Scotland. ...


Castlehead, situated to the southwest of the centre of the town, is a wooded area of Victorian villas where many of the town's leading industrialists made their homes in the late 19th century. It is a conservation area. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... A conservation area is a tract of land that has been awarded protected status in order to ensure that natural features or biota are safeguarded. ...


Oakshaw, situated on a hill to the north of the High St, is a conservation area and home to many fine buildings including the High Kirk, the Coats Observatory and the former John Neilson Institute, now converted into apartments. Kirk can mean church in general or The Church of Scotland in particular. ... Coats Observatory is one of four public observatories operating in the UK, all of which are sited in Scotland. ...


Thornly Park is located to the south of the town. The area is classed as a conservation area with many examples of various architecture ranging from mock Tudor to Art Deco. Many of the houses were designed by W D McLennan who also designed several local churches such as Saint Matthew's. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ascott House, an early example of Tudorbethan, which Mock Tudor emulates Particularly popular in 20th century high-end tract housing developments is a style formally called Tudor (but sometimes called Mock Tudor). ... Asheville City Hall. ...


Nearer the centre of the town remains many areas of older housing. The town centre, Williamsburgh and Charleston areas contain many examples of Scottish tenement flats. Three to four storeys tall, with shops on the ground floor and constructed of local blond and red sandstone. These tenement flats have been extensively restored and modernised over the last two decades. Williamsburgh is a place name, derived from the name William and the Scots language and Scottish English word burgh: Williamsburgh, Paisley, a residential area in Paisley, Scotland, originally a separate village outwith the boundary of the ancient Burgh of Paisley Williamsburg, Brooklyn, originally called Williamsburgh from 1802-1855 Rockville, Maryland... Categories: Stub | House types ... This article is about the geological formation. ...


Gockston in the far north of the town has many terraced houses and, after regeneration has many detached and semi-detached houses as well as several blocks of flats. Gockston Gockston is a small housing state in the north of Paisley acros the M8 from Glasgow Airport. ...


Ralston a residential area in the far east of the town bordering Glasgow was outside the Paisley burgh boundary when constructed in the 1930s but, as a result of local authority re-organisation in the 1990s, it is now generally regarded to be a suburb of Paisley. Ralston (Baile Raghnaill in Scottish Gaelic) is a small, suburban settlement in Renfrewshire, Scotland, bordering onto the eastern edge of the royal burgh of Paisley. ...


Dykebar, situated to the south east of the centre of the town, is a residential area which also the site of a secure mental hospital. Dykebar is a small residential estate at the southernmost point of Paisley. ...


Economy

Several ties showing the Paisley pattern that made the town famous in the 19th century

Paisley was at one time famous for its weaving industry. For nearly a hundred years until the 1870s shawls of the Paisley pattern were in fashion. Until the Jacquard loom was introduced in the 1820s weaving was a cottage industry. This innovation led to the industrialisation of the process. As a result many weavers lost their livelihoods and left for Canada and Australia. One of these, a man named John Hart and a Paisley mill owner, settled at Perth, Ontario, where he had a Book Store and Mercantile shop. Paisley ties, Western Europe, late 20th century Photo by KF File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Paisley ties, Western Europe, late 20th century Photo by KF File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Paisley is a droplet-shaped vegetal motif, similar to half of the Tai Chi symbol, the Indian bodhi tree leaf, or the mango tree. ... Jacquard loom on display at Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester, England The Jacquard loom is a mechanical loom, invented by Joseph Marie Jacquard in 1801, which used the holes punched in pasteboard punched cardpunched card corresponded to one row of the design and the cards were strung together... The use of the term has expanded, and is used to refer to any event which allows a large number of people to lalalawork part time. ... Perth is a town in eastern Ontario, Canada (pop. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ...


Due to its damp, mild climate Paisley was for many years a centre for the manufacture of cotton sewing thread. At the heyday of Paisley thread manufacture in the 1930s there were 28,000 people employed in the huge Anchor and Ferguslie mills of J & P Coats Ltd (Coats Viyella) said to be the largest of their kind in the world at that time. In the 1950s the mills diversified into the production of synthetic threads but with cheap foreign imports and the establishment by Coats of mills in India and Brazil the writing was on the wall for Paisley and production began to diminish rapidly. By the end of the 1980s there was no thread being produced in Paisley. However, both industries have left a permanent mark on the town in the form of the many places with textile related names, for example, Dyer's Wynd, Cotton Street, Thread Street, Shuttle Street, Lawn Street, Silk Street, Mill Street and Incle Street. Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ...


The town also supported a number of engineering works some of which relied on the textile industry, others on shipbuilding. With the demise of both these industries in the west of Scotland the engineering works too have all but gone.


In the mid 1970s industry in Paisley went into rapid decline. The preserve manufacturer Robertsons which was founded in Paisley in the 1860s closed its Stevenson Street factory and transferred production to Bristol, Manchester and London. This closure was followed by those of the engineering firms of Fullerton, Hodgart and Barclay and Whites Engineering. James Robertson was a grocer in Paisley, Scotland, who was persuaded to buy a barrel of bitter oranges. ... This article is about the English city. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


In 1981 the area was dealt a massive blow when Peugeot Talbot, formerly Chrysler and before that Rootes, announced that their Linwood factory just outside of Paisley would cease production.[4] Almost 5000 workers were laid off. The knock on effect on other businesses in the area was immeasurable and, despite numerous regeneration projects, Linwood has never recovered. Peugeot is a major French car brand, part of PSA Peugeot Citroën. ... For other uses, including the Chrysler Brand, see Chrysler (disambiguation). ... The Rootes Group is a now-defunct British automobile manufacturer. ... Linwood, a small town in Renfrewshire, Scotland, 14 miles south-west of Glasgow, which saw an explosion in its population during the middle of the 20th century due to the mass exodus of people from the Glasgow slums. ...


Brown and Polson commenced producing starch and cornflour in Paisley in the 1860s. It later became CPC Foods Ltd, a subsidiary of Unilever, which produced Hellmann's mayonnaise, Gerber baby foods and Knorr soups. The company ceased production in Paisley in 2002. Starch (CAS# 9005-25-8, chemical formula (C6H10O5)n,[1]) is a mixture of amylose and amylopectin (usually in 20:80 or 30:70 ratios). ... Products treated with cornstarch Cornstarch, or cornflour, is the starch of the maize grain, commonly known as corn. ... Unilever is a widely listed [2] [3] multi-national corporation, formed of Anglo-Dutch parentage, that owns many of the worlds consumer product brands in foods, beverages, cleaning agents and personal care products. ... Hellmanns and Best Foods are brand names that are used for the same line of mayonnaise and other food products. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see Mayonaise (song). ... The Gerber baby, who appears on the packaging of all Gerber products, is a portrait of four-month-old Ann Turner Cook. ... This article is about a food/beverage brand. ...


Other businesses to have closed since the 1990s are the Scottish Gas distribution and service centre, Cadbury's distribution centre and William Grant & Sons the Scotch whisky producer. This page is about the former gas monopoly in the United Kingdom for information about the successor companies please see Centrica, BG Group and Transco. ... Cadbury Schweppes plc (Cadbury Trebor Bassett) is a chocolate and beverage company with its headquarters in London, UK. Jacob Schweppe developed a method to make mineral water in Geneva, Switzerland in 1783. ... William Grant & Sons Ltd. ... Scotch whisky is whisky made in Scotland. ...


Some of the remaining employers in the town are Scotch whisky blenders and bottlers Chivas Brothers now a subsidiary of Pernod Ricard and the pigment manufacturers of the Swiss company Ciba Geigy. Both companies employ considerably fewer people than in the past. For other uses, see Whisky (disambiguation). ... Chivas Regal is a Premium Scotch whisky produced in Strathisla, Speyside, Scotland, and traces its roots back to Aberdeen in 1801. ... Pernod Ricard is a French company producing alcoholic beverages. ... Swiss may be: Related to Switzerland: the Swiss Confederation Swiss people Swiss cheese Swiss corporations Switzerland-related topics Named Swiss: Swiss, Missouri Swiss, North Carolina Swiss, West Virginia Swiss, Wisconsin Swiss International Air Lines Swiss Re SWiSS is also used as a disparaging nickname for the Socialist Workers Student Society. ... Ciba-Geigy was a major Swiss company which produced pharmaceuticals, agricultural products and other chemicals. ...


Retailing

The Piazza Shopping Centre, based in the heart of Paisley, has forged many links within the community and is the town's busiest centre. Featuring household names such as Somerfield, Subway, New Look, D2 and The Carphone Warehouse, The Piazza is also home to one of the Top 50 Post Office branches in the UK - one of two Scottish flagship stores, it was made a Crown Post Office in 2007. The Piazza has also recently launched a Student Card, providing a range of discounts for the thousands of students that pass through Paisley every year. Somerfield is a chain of small to medium-sized supermarkets operating in the United Kingdom. ... Subway is a franchise fast food restaurant that primarily sells sandwiches and salads. ... For other uses, see New Look (disambiguation). ... D2 may be: D2, Deuterium gas d2, tabletop role-playing game parlance for a two-sided die, such as a coin D2 (band), a Bulgarian pop music band D2 (video format), a professional digital video format Datasaab D2, a concept computer designed by the Swedish firm Datasaab Diablo II Dublin... The Carphone Warehouse Group PLC (LSE: CPW), known as The Carphone Warehouse, is Europes largest independent mobile phone retailer, with over 1,700 stores across Europe. ... Small-town post office and town hall in Lockhart, Alabama A post office is a facility (in most countries, a government one) where the public can purchase postage stamps for mailing correspondence or merchandise, and also drop off or pick up packages or other special-delivery items. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


The Paisley Centre is a three floored centre including a department store, an indoor market and over 50 shopping units including Marks and Spencer, Boots, Superdrug, Vodafone, Thorntons, The Body Shop and T-Mobile as well as many local outlets. Marks and Spencer plc (known also as M&S and sometimes colloquially as Marks and Sparks) is the largest retailer in the United Kingdom by sales. ... Boots is the name of at least five different albums and singles: Boots by Nancy Sinatra (1966) Boots by Mighty Gabby (1984) Boots by Condemned Eighty Four (2001) Boots by KMFDM (2002) Boots by Noe Venable (2003) It is also the name of a large chain of chemists in the... Superdrug on Oxford Street Superdrug is the UKs second largest health and beauty retail chain (behind Boots) and the sixth largest overall (behind Boots, Tesco, Sainsburys, ASDA and Morrisons). ... Vodafone Group Plc is a mobile network operator headquartered in Newbury, Berkshire, England, UK. It is the largest mobile telecommunications network company in the world by turnover and has a market value of about £84. ... Thorntons is a British chocolate company established by Joseph William Thornton in 1911. ... The Body Shop in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. ... T-Mobile logo T-Mobile is a multinational mobile phone operator. ...


In recent years, however, the quality and variety of shopping has declined, with many of Paisley's more affluent customers choosing to shop at the (1998) Braehead Shopping Centre which lies within Renfrewshire's boundaries and also the Silverburn Centre wich is in Pollock area of Glasgow Through this competition and high tax rates for local businesses[citation needed], many stores have been forced to close their doors. Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Braehead is a shopping centre located in Renfrew near Glasgow. ...


Despite a poor perception, however, many retailers are still thriving in Paisley's shopping centres, and adding colour to the town is the variety of busy Continental and Farmers Markets which often take place in the town.


Landmarks

In the 1960s the town centre underwent considerable redevelopment resulting in the demolition of the County Buildings in County Square and the adjacent police station and town gaol. These fine Victorian edifices were replaced by the brutalist concrete Gilmour House and the Piazza shopping centre which spans the White Cart Water. Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... Brutalism is an architectural style that spawned from the Modernist architectural movement and which flourished from the 1950s to the 1970s. ...


Paisley Abbey

Paisley Abbey was the burial place of many Scottish Kings during the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries.
Paisley Abbey was the burial place of many Scottish Kings during the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries.

The west of Paisley Abbey provides an example of original Gothic architecture dating to the 12th century. The east end and tower date to the late 19th and early 20th centuries and are examples of Gothic Revival architecture. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Paisley Abbey Paisley Abbey is a former Cluniac monastery, and current Church of Scotland parish kirk, located on the east bank of the White Cart Water in the centre of the town of Paisley, Renfrewshire, in west central Scotland. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin San Sebastian Church in Manila, Philippines made entirely of steel. ...

Other notable buildings

Paisley Town Hall (the George A. Clark Town Hall) was funded by Clarks, the owners of the Anchor thread mill. In response, their main competitor in the production of thread in the town, Sir Peter Coats, funded the building of the equally magnificent Paisley Museum and Library in 1871. These, and many other remarkably grand buildings in Paisley, testify to the power, influence and success of the textile industry in the town. 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

Thomas Coats Memorial Church
Thomas Coats Memorial Church

The Thomas Coats Memorial Church is an example of Gothic Revival architecture. It dominates the town's skyline with its crown spire more than 60 metres high. Opened in 1894 and designed by Hippolyte Jean Blanc[5] it is the largest Baptist church in Europe. The exterior is made of old red sandstone. Inside, the church is decorated with wood carvings, mosaic floors and marble fonts. The church also contains a 3040 pipe Hill Organ. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin San Sebastian Church in Manila, Philippines made entirely of steel. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Christ Church Episcopal, Morningside (1875-78), Blancs first competition-winning design Hippolyte Jean Blanc (8 August 1844 – 17 March 1917) was a Scottish architect. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...

Roman Catholic Cathedral of Saint Mirin, Paisley, Scotland

The Cathedral Church of Saint Mirin (St Mirin's Cathedral) in Incle Street is the seat of the Catholic Bishop of Paisley. The church was completed in 1931 to replace an earlier building, in nearby East Buchanan Street, which dated from 1808. The original St Mirin's church was the first Catholic church to be built in Scotland since the Reformation. With the erection of the Diocese of Paisley in 1947 the church was raised to cathedral status. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 792 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1505 × 1140 pixel, file size: 221 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 792 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1505 × 1140 pixel, file size: 221 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... This article is about the country. ... St Mirins Cathedral (correctly The Cathedral Church of Saint Mirin), dedicated to Saint Mirin patron saint of Paisley, is the mother church of the Catholic Diocese of Paisley and is the seat of the Bishop of Paisley. ... The Bishop of Paisley is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Paisley in the Province of Glasgow. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... John Knox regarded as the leader of the Scottish Reformation The Scottish Reformation was Scotlands formal break with the papacy in 1560, and the events surrounding this. ... The Roman Catholic Diocese of Paisley is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in Scotland. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ...


St Matthew's Church (Church of the Nazarene) at the junction of Gordon Street and Johnston Street is Art Nouveau in style. Designed by local architect William Daniel McLennan, a contemporary of Charles Rennie Mackintosh, it was built in 1906. The Church of the Nazarene, more commonly called the Nazarene Church, is an Christian evangelical denomination. ... Vitebsk Railway Station one of the finest examples of Art Nouveau architecture. ... Charles Mackintosh redirects here. ... Year 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


The Russell Institute was built in 1926.[6] The Russell Institute is a building in Paisley, Scotland. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The "A"[7] listed Anchor Mill (built 1886)[8] was converted, in 2005, into modern apartments. The building is an example of successful redevelopment of old industrial areas. Listed can refer to: a listing of securities on a stock exchange the fact that a building is a listed building in the United Kingdom, protected from alteration or demolition for heritage purposes This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same...


Paisley Civic Centre designed by Sir Basil Spence and Partners was built in the 1960s to house the Renfrewshire county offices. It was intended to become the civic hub for Paisley but the absence of any shops and non-council premises prevented this from happening.[9] It became the home of the Renfrew sub-region of Strathclyde Regional Council in 1975 and of Renfrewshire Council in 1996. It is listed by the conservation organisation DoCoMoMo as one of the sixty key Scottish monuments of the post-war period. Sir Basil Urwin Spence, OM, OBE, RA, (13 August 1907 – 19 November 1976) was a Scottish architect, most notably associated with Coventry Cathedral and the Beehive, but also responsible for numerous other buildings in the Modernist/Brutalist style. ... Renfrewshire was a county of Scotland until their abolition in 1975. ... Strathclyde (Srath Chluaidh in Gaelic) was one of the regional council areas of Scotland from 1975 to 1996. ... Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority regions in Scotland. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... DoCoMoMo Key Scottish Monuments is a list compiled in 1993 by the international architectural conservation organisation DoCoMoMo. ... This article should be transwikied to wiktionary The term post-war is generally used for the period after the end of World War II, i. ...


Education

In 1992, Paisley College of Technology, founded in 1896 as Paisley Central Institution, became the University of Paisley which merged with Bell College in Hamilton on the 1st of August, 2007. The merged institution was then renamed as the University of The West of Scotland on the 30th of November 2007. The town also contains Reid Kerr College which provides Further Education. There are four Secondary Schools in Paisley: Paisley Grammar School, Castlehead High School, St. Andrew's Academy and Gleniffer High School. The oldest of these is Paisley Grammar which was founded in 1586. Scottish Central Institutions Central Institutions were a range of higher education institutes in 20th Century Scotland responsible for providing degree-level education but emphasising teaching rather than research. ... The University of Paisley operates across three campus sites in the west and south-west of Scotland: Paisley, Ayr and Dumfries. ... Bell College is a higher education college based in Hamilton and Dumfries in Scotland. ... , The county town of Lanarkshire, Hamilton is situated in west central Scotland and serves as the main administrative centre of the South Lanarkshire council area. ... It is proposed to create The University of The West of Scotland by a merger of the University of Paisley and Bell College in Autumn (fall) 2008. ... This article or section reads like an advertisement. ... Further education (often abbreviated FE) is post-secondary, post-compulsory education (in addition to that received at secondary school). ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... Paisley Grammar School, situated on Glasgow Road, Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland, and dating from 1586, is a Scottish non-denominational state school. ...


Until the late 1990s there were five more secondary schools, now no longer in existence having been the casualties of the reduction in pupil numbers - Merksworth High School (to the north west of the town), John Neilson High School (founded 1852) and St Mirin's High School (on the west side of the town), St Aelred's High School and Stanely Green High School (both on the south side of the town).


Famous Names

Well established names in the media from Paisley include, David Tennant, Paulo Nutini, Tom Conti,John Reid-(Elton John Management), Gerry Rafferty, Joe Egan, Kari Corbett, Gerard Butler, Neve McIntosh, John MacNeal Sr and Jr, and John Byrne. David Tennant (born David John McDonald;[1] 18 April 1971) is a Scottish actor. ... Paolo Giovanni Nutini (born 9th January 1987) is a singer/songwriter from Paisley, Scotland. ... Kari Corbett is a young Scottish actress most famous for her role in BBC drama, Monarch of the Glen as bartender Zoë and for her roles in Jeopardy and River City. ... Gerard James Butler (born November 13, 1969) is a Scottish actor perhaps best known for his portrayal of King Leonidas in 300 and The Phantom in the 2004 film version of The Phantom of the Opera. ... Neve McIntosh, Scotish actress born on January 1, 1972 in Paisley, Scotland. ... For other uses of John Byrne, see John Byrne (disambiguation). ...


Media

Viewers in Paisley can receive all the UK terrestrial channels and radio listeners can receive all the major UK stations plus a number of local services. The local daily newspaper is the Paisley Daily Express whose offices are located on New Street in the town centre of Paisley. The locally based radio station Q96, has gone off air and has been replaced with 96.3 Rock Radio. Despite being based in Baillieston, Glasgow the terms of the licence state that it must carry Renfrewshire based material. The Paisley Daily Express is a Scottish newspaper based in Paisley, covering the Renfrewshire area. ...

Clyde 1 Categories: United Kingdom broadcasting stubs | Radio stations in the United Kingdom ... XFM Scotland is a regional radio station broadcasting to Scotlands Central Belt, an area surrounding the two cities of Glasgow and Edinburgh. ... Real Radio is a brand of regional radio stations in the United Kingdom owned by GMG Radio. ... From 8th Jan 2007, 96. ... Ferguslie Park (Feegie Park) is a housing area at the north-west extremity of Paisley in Renfrewshire, Scotland. ... BBC Radio 1 (commonly referred to as just Radio 1) is a British national radio station operated by the BBC, specialising in popular music and speech and is aimed primarily at the 14-29[1] age group. ... BBC Radio 2 is one of the BBCs national radio stations and the most popular station in the UK. As well as having most listeners nationally, it ranks first in all regions above local radio stations. ... BBC Radio 3 is a radio station operated by the BBC within the United Kingdom. ... old Radio 4 logo BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... BBC Radio Scotland is BBC Scotlands national radio network, broadcasting since 1976 on 92-95 FM and 810 medium wave. ... For the French radio station, see Virgin Radio (France). ... Smooth Radio is a brand of radio stations in the United Kingdom owned by GMG Radio. ... Classic FM is the United Kingdoms first national commercial radio station, broadcasting classical music in a popular and accessible style. ... talkSPORT is one of the United Kingdoms three terrestrial analogue Independent National Radio broadcasters, offering a commercial sports and talk radio service from London to the United Kingdom. ... BBC Scotland is home to Reporting Scotland, the daily news from Scotland, which shows on the BBC 1 network every day at 6. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 2. ... This article is about the Scottish television network. ... This article is about the British television station. ... Five, launched in 1997, is the fifth and final national terrestrial analogue television channel to launch in the United Kingdom. ... The Paisley Daily Express is a Scottish newspaper based in Paisley, covering the Renfrewshire area. ...

Sport

St Mirren F.C., the local Paisley Scottish Premier League football team, have been given planning permission to move to a new 8,000 seat stadium from their home on the town's Love Street, to one located on Greenhill Road to help regenerate the deprived Ferguslie Park area. Their last major success was on 16 May 1987[10] when St Mirren won the Scottish Cup, with thousands crowding the streets to see the team. Saint Mirren Football Club (usually referred to simply as St Mirren, or by the nicknames The Buddies or The Saints) are a Scottish football club based in the town of Paisley, Renfrewshire. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... The Scottish Football Association Challenge Cup[1], usually known as the Scottish Cup, is the national cup knockout competition in Scottish football. ...


In (2006), the team won the Scottish Football League First Division and has returned to the Scottish Premier League. They have a very active youth development system and are part of the social fabric of the town. This was demonstrated when at a Renfrewshire Council planning committee board meeting on the new stadium and supermarket to replace Love Street came to be heard. With the initial recommendation that St. Mirren be denied permission for the supermarket but allowed the stadium, something that threatened the future of the club due to the supermarket being only solution to clear its debts, some 300[citation needed] buddies stood outside the final meeting of Renfrewshire Council in Cotton Street on a dry Tuesday Morning in support. The club was granted permission at this meeting with a majority vote of 9-5[citation needed] in favour. Abercorn F.C. were Paisley's other professional team, but fell into decline and subsequent liquidation in 1920. The Irn-Bru Scottish Football League First Division Championship is the highest division of the Scottish Football League and the second highest in the Scottish football league system. ... The Scottish Premier League, currently known as the Clydesdale Bank Premier League for sponsorship reasons and often known as the Scottish Premier League, Premier League or SPL is a professional league competition for football clubs located at the top level of the Scottish football league system — above the Scottish Football... Abercorn F.C. was an amateur football club based in the Paisley just west of Glasgow. ...


Paisley is also the base for Scotland's only professional basketball team, the Scottish Rocks and ice hockey team Paisley Pirates, both of whom use the 5,300 seat Braehead Arena for home games. The Rocks are one of the leading basketball teams in the United Kingdom, competing in the elite British Basketball League. The franchise relocated to Renfrewshire from Edinburgh in 2002 and have built up a loyal and passionate fanbase in the area since. This article is about the country. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Scottish Rocks, officially the Scottish Phoenix Honda Rocks by sponsorship, is a basketball team which plays in the British Basketball League. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Braehead Arena is a 5,300-seat multi-purpose arena in Renfrewshire, Scotland. ... “BBL” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


Paisley also has two cricket grounds by the name of Kelburne Cricket Club and Ferguslie Cricket Club. Both cricketers Majid Haq and Omer Hussain, Scottish internationalist cricketers have played for both Kelburne and currently play for Ferguslie Cricket Club. In addition, Paisley is home to two rugby clubs. Paisley RFC who play Union and Paisley Hurricanes who play League. Both are currently based at the Anchor Recreational Grounds and run several teams and youth and senior level while also providing coaches to local schools. This article is about the sport. ... Rana Majid Haq Khan (born 11 February 1983 in Paisley, Scotland), better known as Majid Haq is a Scottish cricket player. ... Rana Omer Hussain (born 3 December 1984 in Paisley, Scotland) better known as Omer Hussain is a Scottish cricket player. ... Paisley RFC is an amateur rugby union club based at the Anchor Recreation Grounds in Paisley. ... The Paisley Hurricanes are a team in the Scotland Rugby League Conference. ...


Paisley is also home to the Kelburne Hockey Club who have dominated domestic hockey in the last 3 seasons. Kelburne HC run 5 gents teams, 3 ladies teams and have over 100 juniors regularly competing for the club at District and National level. Kelburne HC has also supplies the Scottish National Team the vast majoirty of the Gents team. The club has also had success in Europe with recent tournament victories in Austria and Switzerland.


Motorcycle speedway was staged at St Mirren Park in 1975 and 1976 when the Paisley Lions raced in the second division of the British Leagues. The Lions were moderately successful but despite the best efforts of their supporters, the venue was lost to speedway. Paisley Lions were a motorcycle speedway team that participated in the British National League in 1975 and 1976. ...


Transport

Air

Glasgow International Airport's terminal buildings are located in the North of Paisley at Abbotsinch. The airport authority and the many businesses located in around the airport are a major source of employment for Paisley and towns nearby. Glasgow Airport redirects here. ...


Road

Paisley is connected to the UK motorway network with the M8 running along the northern edge of the town. This forms part of the unsigned E5 Euroroute from Greenock to Gibraltar. Many major A roads converge through the town including the A726, A737 and A761. Kingston Bridge M8 running alongside the Clyde This Stub in the Tradeston area, popularly known as the ski-ramp, is the abandoned interchange for the southern flank of the Glasgow Inner Ring Road For the highway connecting Moscow to Arkhangelsk, see M8 motorway (Russia). ... Map of E5 within Great Britain, France and Spain. ... European Route Sign The international E-road network is a network of roads in Europe, numbered E1 and up. ...


Rail

The town is linked by rail to Glasgow city centre as well as Inverclyde and the Ayrshire coast, being served by four stations (Paisley Gilmour Street, Paisley St James, Paisley Canal and Hawkhead). The rail links also connect to Glasgow Prestwick International Airport and ferry routes to Dunoon, the Isle of Arran, Isle of Bute and Ireland.There are plans in place, and Royal Assent has been given, for a rail link from the Inverclyde Line to Glasgow International Airport, planned for completion in 2009, with services starting in 2010. For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Inverclyde (disambiguation). ... Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir in Scottish Gaelic) is a region of south-west Scotland, located on the shores of the Firth of Clyde. ... Paisley Gilmour Street railway station is located in the centre of the town of Paisley, Scotland. ... Paisley St James railway station is on the Inverclyde Line, serving a residential district of Paisley, Scotland, just west of the town centre. ... Paisley Canal railway station is a railway station in Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland. ... Hawkhead railway station is a railway station in the Seedhill area of Paisley in Renfrewshire, Scotland. ... Glasgow Prestwick Airport from the air Glasgow Prestwick Airport (Scottish Gaelic: ) (IATA: PIK, ICAO: EGPK) is an international airport serving Glasgow, situated north of the town of Prestwick in South Ayrshire, Scotland. ... Dunoon, looking North from the Castle hill with the old Victorian pier to the right and The Queens Hall on the left The Holy Loch seen across the Firth of Clyde with Dunoon on the left The PS Waverley leaves Dunoon Pier, to sail up the Firth of Clyde. ... The Isle of Arran (Scots Gaelic: Eilean Arainn) is the largest island in the Firth of Clyde with an area of 430 km² (167 square miles). ... Bute shown within Argyll and Bute Bute is one of the islands of the lower Firth of Clyde in Scotland. ... The Glasgow Airport Rail Link (GARL) is a proposed rail link which will link Glasgow Central station to Glasgow International Airport. ... The Inverclyde Line is a railway line running from Glasgow Central station through Paisley (Gilmour Street) and a series of stations to the south of the River Clyde and the Firth of Clyde, terminating at Gourock and Wemyss Bay, where it connects to Caledonian MacBrayne ferry services. ... Glasgow Airport redirects here. ...


Canal

Built in 1807 the Glasgow & Ardrossan canal ran from Port Eglinton in Glasgow to Paisley. Despite initial plans, the canal never reached Ardrossan and it terminated at Thorn Brae in Johnston. (See Glasgow, Paisley and Johnstone Canal). After closure in 1885 the canal was de-watered and formed the basis for the Glasgow and South Western Railway Company's Paisley Canal Line connecting Glasgow to Paisley, and onward to Elderslie, Bridge of Weir and Greenock. The second Paisley Canal railway station is operational. The Glasgow, Paisley and Ardrossan Canal was a canal in the west of Scotland running between Glasgow, Paisley and Johnstone which later became a railway. ... Glasgow and South Western Railway formed part of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway. ... The Paisley Canal Railway line originally ran from Glasgow, Scotland, to Paisley Canal Railway Station. ... Paisley Canal railway station is a railway station in Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland. ...


Bus

Bus routes connect to other nearby towns and Glasgow city centre. The town benefits from some of the best transport links in the central belt of Scotland.


See also

There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... It is proposed to create The University of The West of Scotland by a merger of the University of Paisley and Bell College in Autumn (fall) 2008. ... The Paisley canal disaster occurred on the 10 November 1810, on a canal linking Paisley and Johnstone in Renfrewshire, Scotland. ... Inkerman was a small hamlet set up in 1858 in the Abbey Parish Paisley to house ironstone miners. ... Paisley wallpaper Paisley or Paisley pattern is a droplet-shaped vegetal motif of Persian origin, similar to half of the Yin yang symbol, or the leaf of the Indian bodhi tree or the mango tree. ... Paisley Grammar School, situated on Glasgow Road, Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland, and dating from 1586, is a Scottish non-denominational state school. ... St Mirins Academy was a senior secondary school for boys founded in 1922 in Paisley. ... Gockston Gockston is a small housing state in the north of Paisley acros the M8 from Glasgow Airport. ...

References

  1. ^ "GRO Data". Scottish Government.
  2. ^ Extracts from the records - 1588 | British History Online
  3. ^ BBC News, "Scotland reveals most deprived areas", October 2006
  4. ^ Allan, Robert J (1991).Geoffrey Rootes' dream for Linwood. Minster Lovall: Bookmargue Publishing. ISBN 1-870519-12-4
  5. ^ Thomas Coats Memorial Church: Architecture
  6. ^ History of Paisley - Paisley.org.uk
  7. ^ ArchitectureScotland.co.uk
  8. ^ The Prince's Regeneration Trust
  9. ^ Frank Arneil Walker (1986). The South Clyde Estuary. RIAS Publishing. ISBN 0-7073-0476-8.
  10. ^ Scottish Football Association: The Scottish FA: Scotland :

Frank Arneil Walker OBE is a Scottish architectural academic and writer. ... The Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland, or RIAS, is a professional body for architects in Scotland. ...

External links

  • Official Paisley Site
  • Paisley Photo Gallery
  • Paisley People newspaper
  • The Gazette newspaper
  • Paisley Car Leasing

  Results from FactBites:
 
Shawls of Paisley Design (2218 words)
Paisley's output of shawls was the most prolific, and continued for the longest period, so the name 'Paisley' has become a generic term.
Paisley introduced an attachment to the handloom, in 1812, which enabled five different colours of yarn to be used, thus better imitating the Kashmir shawls.
By 1865 a reversible shawl was invented at Paisley which was of double thickness with all the loose unclipped threads sandwiched between the two layers, resulting in a heavy and unpopular shawl.
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