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Encyclopedia > Painter and decorator
A modern painter and decorator.
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A modern painter and decorator.

A painter and decorator is a tradesman responsible for the painting and decorating of buildings, and is also known as a decorator or house painter. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2133x1437, 512 KB) Summary Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Painter and decorator User:Lukeroberts/gallery Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2133x1437, 512 KB) Summary Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Painter and decorator User:Lukeroberts/gallery Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from... A tradesman is a type of worker found in all cultures throughout the world. ...

Contents


History of the trade

Cave paintings, although primitive, are the earliest form of mural decoration known today. Whilst the purpose of these decorations can only be speculated upon, most theories assert a degree of skill involved in their creation, a skill which is carried through in the trade of the house painter. Cave, or rock, paintings are paintings painted on cave or rock walls and ceilings, usually dating to pre_historic times. ...


In England, little is known of the trade and its structures before the late 1200s, at which point guilds began to form, amongst them the Painters Company and the Stainers Company. These two guilds eventually merged with the consent of the Lord Mayor of London in 1502, forming the Painter-Stainers Company. The guild standardised the craft and acted as a protector of the trade secrets, in 1599 asking Parliament for protection, which was eventually granted in a bill of 1606, which granted the trade protection from outside competition such as plasterers. Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1150s 1160s 1170s 1180s 1190s - 1200s - 1210s 1220s 1230s 1240s 1250s Years: 1200 1201 1202 1203 1204 1205 1206 1207 1208 1209 Events and Trends 1200 University of Paris receives charter from Philip II of France 1202-1204 Fourth Crusade - diverted to... A guild is an association of persons of the same trade or pursuits, formed to protect mutual interests and maintain standards of morality or conduct. ... The Worshipful Company of Painter-Stainers is one of the Livery Companies of the City of London. ... A trade secret is a formula, practice, process, design, instrument, pattern, or compilation of information used by a business to obtain an advantage over competitors within the same industry or profession. ... // Gypsum plaster Plaster of Paris, or simply plaster, is a type of building material based on calcium sulfate hemihydrate, nominally (CaSO₄)₂*H₂O. It is created by heating gypsum to about 150 ℃, 2(CaSO₄ · 2H₂O) → (CaSO₄)₂ · H₂O + 3 H₂O (released as steam). ...


The Act legislated for a seven year apprenticeship, and also barred plasterers from painting, unless apprenticed to a painter, with the penalty for such painting being a fine of £5. The Act also enshrined a maximum daily fee of 16 old pence for their labour. Above: A variety of coins considered to be lower-value, including an Irish 2p piece and many US pennies. ...


Enforcement of this Act by the Painter-Stainers Company was sought up until the early 1800s, with master painters gathering irregularly to decide the fees which a journeyman could charge, and also instigating an early version of a job centre in 1769, advertising in the London newspapers a "house of call" system which allowed masters to advertise for journeymen and also for journeymen to advertise for work. The guild's power in setting the fee a journeyman could charge was eventually overturned by law in 1827, and the period after this saw the guild's power diminish, along with that of the other guilds; the guilds were superseded by trade unions, with the Operative United Painters' Union formed sometime around 1831. Events and Trends Beginning of the Napoleonic Wars (1803 - 1815). ... // History A master craftsman (sometimes called only master or grandmaster) was a member of a guild. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Tradesperson. ... JobCentre Plus is the government-funded employment agency facility and the social security office in the United Kingdom, often operated from a high street shop. ... London is the capital city of England and of the United Kingdom, and is the most populous city in the European Union. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers...


In 1894 a national association formed, recreating itself in 1918 as the National Federation of Master Painters and Decorators of England and Wales, changing its name once again to the British Decorators Association before merging, in 2002, with the Painting & Decorating Federation to form the Painting & Decorating Association. The Construction Industry Joint Council, a body formed of both unions and business organisations, today has responsibility for the setting of pay levels. For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


Tools of the trade

The brush and the roller are the tools most readily associated with the painter. Recent advances in manufacture have led to a standardisation of brushes, with many older brushes falling from fashion. Different styles of paintbrushes The term brush refers to a variety of devices mainly with bristles, wire or other filament of any possible material used mainly for cleaning, grooming hair, painting, deburring and other kinds of surface finishing, but also for many other purposes like (but not limited to) seals... Manufacturing is the transformation of raw materials into finished goods for sale, or intermediate processes involving the production or finishing of semi-manufactures. ...


The ground brush, also known as a pound brush, was a round or elliptical brush bound by wire, cord or metal. They were generally heavy to use, and required considerable usage to break them in. These brushes were predominantly used in the days before modern paint manufacture techniques; hand mixed paints requiring more working to create the finish. These brushes still have use in applying primer; the brushes are useful in working the primer into the grain of the wood. Pound brushes required an even breaking in to create even bevel on both sides of the brush minimising the formation of a point which would render the brush useless. The ellipse and some of its mathematical properties. ... A wire is a single, usually cylindrical, elongated strand of drawn metal. ... Look up Cord on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Cord has several meanings: String or Rope Cord Automobile Vibrating cord A measurement of the volume of firewood A power cord or extension cable In electronics, a cable Cord, a former American car marque founded by Errett Lobban Cord. ... Hot metal work from a blacksmith Look up Metal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Dried green paint Paint is the general term for a family of products used to protect and add color to an object or surface by covering it with a pigmented coating. ... Primer is a preparatory coating put on materials before painting. ... A bevel is a slant or angle on a surface. ...


Sash tools were smaller brushes, similar to a ground brush, and used mainly for cutting in sash or glazing bars found on windows. A belt is a flexible band, made of either leather or a type of cloth, worn around the waist, generally serving the purpose of supporting clothing items that would otherwise become too loose, particularly trousers. ...


Sash tools and ground brushes generally required bridling before use, and a painter's efficiency in this skill was generally used as a guide to their overall ability. Both these brushes have largely been superseded by the modern varnish brush.


Varnish brushes are the common flat brushes available today, used for painting as well as varnishing. Brushes intended for varnishing typically have a bevelled edge. Varnish is a finish applied to wood or other surfaces in order to provide a clear, hard, durable, protective finish. ...


Distemper brushes, used for applying distemper, were best made of pure bristle and bound by copper bands to prevent rust damage. Styles differed across the world, with flat nailed brushes popular in the North of England, a two knot brush (a brush with two ovular heads) popular in the South of England, and three knot brushes or flat head brushes preferred elsewhere. In the United States distemper brushes were known as calcimine, kalsomine or calsomine brushes, each term being the U.S. variant of distemper. Distemper can refer to Canine distemper, a disease of dogs Other forms of the distemper virus A mixture, used by artists, of paint usually with parts of an egg This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A bristle is a stiff hair or feather. ... A blacksmith removing rust with sand prior to welding Rust damage in automobiles can cause hidden yet dangerous situations. ...


Fitches are smaller brushes, either ovular or flat and 1 inch wide, used in fine work such as to pick out the detail on a painted moulding. Molding or moulding is a strip of material with various cross sections used to cover transitions between surfaces or for decoration. ...


Stipplers come in various shapes and sizes and are used to apply paint with a stippled effect. An example of stippling in a biological illustration. ...


A duster or jamb brush was used to dust the area to be painted before work commenced.


Limewash brushes were large brushes with a triangular head used to apply limewash. Whitewash is a type of inexpensive paint made from slaked lime (Calcium hydroxide, or Ca(OH)2) and chalk (whiting). ...


Stencil brushes, similar in style to a shaving brush and used for the purpose of stencilling walls or in the creation of hand-made wallpapers. a political stencil Stencil w/tools used to make it. ...


Brushes are best stored in a purpose made brush keeper, a box on which a wire could be suspended: the wire would be threaded through the hole in a brushes handle so as to suspend the brush in a cleaning solution without allowing the brush to sit on the bottom of the container and thus cause spreading of the bristles. The solution would also prevent hardening of the brushes and oxidisation. These were generally rectangular and stored several brushes. A lid would enclose the brushes and keep them free from dust.


Activities of the trade

Historically, the painter and decorator was responsible for the mixing of the paint; keeping a ready supply of pigments, oils, thinners, driers and sundries. The painter would use his experience to determine a suitable mixture dependent upon the nature of the job. This role has reduced almost to zero as modern paint manufacturing techniques and architect specifications have created a reliance on brand label products. Dried green paint Paint is the general term for a family of products used to protect and add color to an object or surface by covering it with a pigmented coating. ... In biology, pigment is any material resulting in color in plant or animal cells which is the result of selective absorption. ... Oil painting is done on surfaces with pigment ground into a medium of oil - especially in early modern Europe, linseed oil. ... Turpentine substitute is a mineral-based replacement for the vegetable-based organic solvent turpentine. ... Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect is a person involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ...


Larger firms operating within the trade were generally capable of performing many painting or decoration services, from signwriting, to the gilding of objects or even the finishing or re-finishing of furniture. A sign for photo model using SignWriting in the dictionary of the Flemish Sign Language Sign Writing is a system of writing the movements and handshapes of sign languages. ... Gilding is the art of spreading gold, either by mechanical or by chemical means, over the surface of a body for the purpose of ornament. ... Furniture is the collective term for the movable objects which support the human body (seating furniture and beds), provide storage, and hold objects on horizontal surfaces above the ground. ...


See also

Primer
Scaffolding

Primer can refer to more than one thing: Look up Primer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Bamboo scaffolding can reach great heights Scaffolding is a temporary framework used to support people and material in the construction or repair of buildings and other large structures. ...

Reference

  • The Modern Painter and Decorator volume 1 1921 Caxton

 
 

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